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If I am going to a college with bigger class sizes, how should I talk to my professor about having more one on one help without feeling scared or awkward?

I am attending Plymouth State University, and although they don't generally have the bigger class sizes, I am afraid of feeling awkward about asking for more help especially in more elaborate classes like criminal justice. #professor #college-student #former-student


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Charlotte’s Answer

Great question! I went to a very large university, and although it is easier said than done, my first piece of advice is that you should never feel awkward about asking a question. You will be at a learning institution - intellectual curiosity is what everyone should strive for, and you are there to learn. Don't feel self-conscious if you have questions--that is the best way to show that you are engaged and eager to learn.


At any school/university, professors have office hours where you can go one-on-one, and although I have been out of school for many years now, I'm sure there are so many ways to extend the one-on-one accessibility through technology like emails and chats. Certainly use these methods if you can get your answers that way. In very large classes, professors also have teaching assistants (typically graduate students), and although they can vary greatly in quality, they are really good resources to tap if you need additional help offline. I would also look into online resources generally, as I'm sure there are chat rooms and groups for every topic imaginable (and likely even specific to your school or class). You are lucky to be in this generation where information online is virtually infinite. Best of luck!


Thank you so much! Gillian L.

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Jeffrey’s Answer

You are certainly not the only one who may feel this way. Talk to your peers - those that sit around you - develop friendships - partnerships with similar common interests - form or join a study group - just a few interested souls who seek answers to questions you may have. Be it social or academic based challenge yourself and others on the more interesting topics in the course. For criminal justice related topics check out local jurisdictions police websites - become aware of what's happening locally - there may be a statewide judiciary search webpage - check out Maryland's website for the basics. Good luck with all your endeavors and let your curiosity know no bounds - and never hesitate to speak your mind and ask questions - the learning never stops.


Thank you so much! Gillian L.

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