Skip to main content
3 answers
4
Asked 784 views Translate

Is attending an ouit of state college financially responsible?

I have received a scholarship to attend a local university. However, the career I've always dreamed of having as a video game developer isn't offered at the local university. I have been accepted at a major university out of state. Though I have been offered a honors at entrance partial scholarship, I'm just not sure if paying the extremely high non residential tuition will be financially responsible. #guidance-counselor #career-counselor #financial-advisor

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

4

3 answers


0
Updated Translate

Kathryn’s Answer

The high cost of tuition can burden graduates for decades after graduation. Perhaps think about the earnings potential in your desired career, and think about how long it could take you to pay your loans back if you earn that amount- especially if you go to an expensive school. With that said, it's likely hard to know what earnings could be, so it does take a leap of faith to some extent. I agree with Paul's answer, evaluate all your options and then you'll know that you're making the best choice you can for what you intend to do. Good luck!
0
0
Updated Translate

Sam’s Answer

Great question. I went to an out of state school because I really wanted to go there. It ended up being a very great experience, and I have connections in a lot of places that I wouldnt have had if I didnt go.

One downside, I have a lot of student debt. My experience was 100 percent worth having debt out of college. I am now coming close to paying it down at 26 years old. I would say that if you know that you are going to take college really seriously and are in love with the university, then go!

If your in state option is significantly cheaper and you think you would get the same education, connections, etc out of it, then really consider staying in state. I hope this helps!
0
0
Updated Translate

Paul’s Answer

This is a tough decision. In my opinion, if you are truly focused on becoming a video game developer and that major is not offered locally, you have to expand your college options. BUT that doesn't mean going out of state. Have you looked at other colleges in your state to see if that major is offered? I ask because you said local university. There may be plenty of schools that may offer that major that are in your home state that you didn't even know about. Now, assuming you've done all of that already and your only other option is to go out of state you then have to decide how much extra you're willing to pay to go out of state. That major may be offered at different colleges in different nearby states so you have to compare tuition costs for out of state students. In the end, if you've done all of these things and you definitely want to major in video game development, the school offering you the partial scholarship is your only option. I would consider it financial responsible assuming you've done all the research regarding other schools. Last point, have you considered a major that is similar to video game development? Maybe there is a major at the local university (or another in-state school) that is similar in the required coursework.

0