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How many high risk calls would you say each dispatcher gets on a day to day basis?

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I am training to become a 911 dispatcher. I really want to know more about how it is. #learning

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Carolyn’s Answer

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Go to the trade assoication for Law Enforcement and Emergency response, as well as each state's annual report on Law enforcement and LOOK THIS UP.

Why does the daily number matter to you? The Law of Large Numbers - as applied to most Dispatch jobs means there will not be a predictable daily average.

Isn;t your real question "How to real life dispatchers keep their emotional Intelligence and self-confidence at its peak so they can Give their BEST to each and every incomeing call?" Then ask yourelf if you have what it takes to be grace and effeciency, acting as if there is no pressure so as to keep everyone invovled calm and communicating correctly and accurately. If you don;t have what it takes NOW do this job, what can help you build the ability? SKy Diving? Hang Gliding? Minding4 year old triplet boys on your own for a full 24 hours?

IF you want this career, you will figure it out on your own. No one can prescribe what you need but you.

Carolyn W
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David’s Answer

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I started my Law Enforcement career as a dispatcher. I can only assume you mean emergency calls when you refer to high risk. The number of emergency calls will vary depending on the area you are working. If it is a larger city there will be more vs a rural town or county. Also the day of the week tends to be a factor. Weekends vs workdays. And then of course the shifts may vary as well. Day shifts are usually medical, alarms and accident calls, Evening shifts tend to be domestic disturbance calls, Midnight shifts are your bar fights, and alcohol related calls.
Hope this helps.
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