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is there any free online things to do to build up for college

#college #college #college #college #college #college #college #college

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

GREAT Question Edf,

BE PREPARED FOR ONLINE CLASSES – This year's freshman experience will likely be a bit different from previous years. Be prepared for more online classes and new social distancing measures by checking your college's website frequently for updates. Before classes start, you should acquire all the necessary technology you might need to complete online courses successfully and research school resources before problems arise. Online classes can present unique challenges, however, if you’re not prepared. But if you develop skills for effective online learning, you’ll find the courses can be an excellent alternative to a traditional classroom setting. When setting up your study space, make sure you:
• Have a high-speed internet connection
• Have the required books, materials, and software for the course
• Have headphones for listening to lectures or discussions (especially important in shared spaces)

CREATE A REGULAR STUDY SPACE – Set up a dedicated learning environment for studying. By completing your work there repeatedly, you’ll begin to establish a routine. Whether your workspace is your kitchen table, a library, or the corner booth in a local coffee shop, it’s important to determine what type of environment will work best for you. Experiment to discover which type of setting boosts your productivity. Wherever you choose, make sure there’s high-speed internet access so you’re not trying to take an online course over a lagging connection. Setting up a regular workspace or office will also help you to stay organized. Knowing exactly where important dates, files, forms, syllabi, books, and assignments live will help keep you on track towards hitting your goals.

TAKE AN ONLINE SPEED READING COURSE THIS SUMMER – College coursework consists of substantially more reading than is required in high school. Students should start getting used to the increased workload by reading books during high school and the summer before college. What you read is not as important as how much, but it helps to select recommendations for your intended college major or areas of academic and personal interest.

INVEST IN A GOOD TIME-MANAGEMENT APP – Balancing the academic and social demands of college can be a challenge for even the most diligent student. But there are plenty of digital tools designed for students, and a little organization can go a long way in making sure time is used wisely. Smartphone apps and tools can help students limit time on entertainment and social media, and can help keep study schedules on track. Look at the syllabus at the start of the semester and make note of major assignments. Mark them on a calendar you check regularly so you know what workload is coming in the weeks ahead.

RESEARCH EVERYTHING ABOUT YOUR MAJOR – It's always a good idea to make a connection with someone who can help you figure out the best plan of attack for completing all of your major/minor requirements. Cultivating a strong relationship with professors can go a long way in helping students succeed. Once students have selected their classes, they should consider emailing a handful of instructors or seeing if they can talk via videoconferencing or a phone call this summer. Make sure to be respectful and mature in all communications with professors and other academic staff.

STAY CONNECTED – Connect with others! Online portals, discussion boards and Facebook can help to find students in the same course, maybe even in your local area. Connect with peers and team up for group assessments, stay in touch, and help each other with proof-reading, tips and exchange of resources. Talking to other students opened my mind and kept me motivated. Engage! Don’t disengage simply because it is online learning. Interact with your classmates and lecturer as though you were doing in-class learning to gain the ultimate benefits.

KNOW WHERE TO GET ACADEMIC HELP – Incoming freshmen should be aware that many colleges have offices dedicated to helping students brainstorm and write essays. Students having difficulty in a class or who just want to speak with a professor one-on-one should take advantage of open office hours. School libraries can also offer knowledgeable staff and study resources to help students. Use any of the student resources that are available. For instance, your college has an online library which offers sources for assignments. Another resource that is sometimes available is a writing center. If you need your paper fixed or just have a question on formatting, the writing center can help.

STAY SAFE – Some students will find themselves taking courses both online and in person this fall as the U.S. continues to grapple with the coronavirus pandemic, and it's important for students to feel safe navigating campus. Students should practice common sense by being aware of their surroundings and learning about how their college handles safety issues, including sexual assault. Both parents and students should take time before the semester begins to become familiar with the campus' safety resources and procedures.

Hope this was Helpful Edf
Thank you comment icon Thank You Catherine. “Volunteers are the only human beings on the face of the earth who reflect this nation’s compassion, unselfish caring, patience, and just plain loving one another.” – Erma Bombeck Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Eliza. “Our generation has the ability and the responsibility to make our ever-more connected world a more hopeful, stable and peaceful place.” — Natalie Portman Doc Frick
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David’s Answer

I have to agree with the other advice listed in this question, but with a caveat.

I don't think you should do something for the sake of "building" a profile for college.

I'm a current upperclassmen in college, and when I was in high school, I joined many clubs and organizations and took many challenging classes in order to boost what my profile would look to colleges. However, I never once thought about whether or not I actually enjoyed these challenging topics, or if I was really passionate about certain clubs.

So I do agree. You should be proactive. You should seek out educational and skill-building opportunities online and around you. However, before you head into unknown territory, ask yourself if this is something you want to explore - something you really care about. Your main priority should not be to "build" a resume or "build" the ideal college candidate. You should be exploring things you're interested in and skills you want to have as a person.

Good luck! (And definitely look into some of the resources from some of the other answerers!)
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Catherine’s Answer

It is very tempting to want to dive into the area of study you are pursuing to get a head start. However, there is plenty of time for that once you are in school.

What I would recommend is putting some time into the soft skills that may fall to the side once you get in the swing of your academics.

- Research effective time management / organization skills for college students. Having a good strategy in these areas from the start can help make your transition to college smoother and hopefully save you some stress.
- Learn about healthy habits and routines so that your body is rested and able to keep up with your new academic schedule. Remember that classes are longer and sometimes at later times during the day compared to high school.
- Learn more about clubs or activities that your school offers so that you can get involved. This will allow you to socialize outside your classes and provide an often needed stress relief activity.

While it's important to stay on top of your studies, it is also equally as important to learn how to take care of yourself mentally, physically, and emotionally!
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Matthew’s Answer

There are a lot of apps or certifications online that are free, and will help you separate yourself from your peers.

Matthew recommends the following next steps:

Learn a second language (DuoLingo)
Microsoft certificate
Harvard programming (code)
Community service (A lot of online options)
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Christina’s Answer

You can take CLEP tests to test out of some classes in college. They are similar to AP tests, but are free if you go through Modern States.
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Ning’s Answer

Yes there are definitely free online courses / programs which can add weight to your resume for university applications.

LinkedIn Learning offers a variety of free courses / programs which you can select from based on your interest.
https://www.linkedin.com/learning/

Hope this helps. Cheers!
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