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Looking for a guitar tech, band manager, etc, job opportunity near me that doesn't involve too much lifting or standing/walking. Help?

I'm physically disabled and can't lift or stand/walk too much. I also don't have a degree or much job experience other than an office. I'm an amateur songwriter though and literally looking for anything that will expose me to music. Paid or unpaid is fine as long as there's an opportunity to get paid eventually. #music #jobs

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Subject: Career question for you

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David’s Answer

Emily, if you are disabled, you can forget about guitar tech, or anything tech. If you are young and look healthy, someone will ask you to help them lift something heavy. And it’s real hard to say no if people look at you funny when you do.

If you are a song writer/ singer, start lip rolling. Go to you tube and look for a lip roll demo. You will find one. Anything Brett Manning is good. He is the creator of this. Lip roll as a warm up. It sounds silly, but it’s designed to loosen you up and not be serious about singing. If you take it too seriously you will tense up. And that’s why singers stay at amateur status. If you continue as a lip roller, you won’t be an amateur for long.

David recommends the following next steps:

http://singingsucces.com/
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Dina’s Answer

Hi Emily,

You might consider studio production.

To be a professional, you'll need to complete a Bachelor's degree in science of music, or Bachelor's degree in music. You'll also need to study industry law and ethics and learn sound editing techniques. You'll also probably need at least 3+ years' experience using digital audio hardware and software. To get that experience, you might consider contacting a studio near you and offering to do an internship or pro bono work there.

That may sound like a lot of work... It is. But you're young and can start now. Any profession in music is going to take a bit of time and a lot of dedication but it can be done! If music is your love, stick with it and more importantly, enjoy the PROCESS -- we spend most of our time preparing/practicing/learning...

Here's a good article with more ideas on how to go about it: https://www.musicindustryhowto.com/how-to-be-a-professional-full-time-music-producer/

Hope that helps!

Dina recommends the following next steps:

Look into getting a degree in music at a nearby college
Contact a music studio and offer to work for free or low pay
Read articles written by other music producers
Write/call music producers and interview them / get advice from them (here's link for producers in CT: https://www.upwork.com/l/us/music-producers-in-ct/?gclid=Cj0KCQjwqfz6BRD8ARIsAIXQCf3P-cPXwwtu0kY0fNMP-OtA3_FtP6r98qqrgG01SitdUzwFoSpmbNAaAt8HEALw_wcB)
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Ragon’s Answer

That is actually a good idea that many don't pursue. I wouldn't let your lifting ability discourage you as instrument techs need to learn a lot about the inter workings of the gear and be able to make repairs. There are always folks that can lift things. Getting some intern experience at a local guitar shop could help you with that. Then, you could take those skills on the road. Right now of course the touring business is not really active due to COVID but hopefully this turns around next year. Best wishes!
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