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What is one thing you wish you knew before starting your career?


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Douglas’s Answer

Interesting question. I do not have an answer to what I wished I knew. But, the one thing I did know is that I did not ever want to quit. If I chose to do something, I would carry it to completion. I did not always do "great", but I always finished.

Thank you for your insight! Mireia R.

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Kim’s Answer

Hi again Mireia!

I love your questions!

I work helping people to find jobs. What I wish I knew is how focused the social services are on "measurements."
1. How many customers did you help today?
2. How many job referrals did you give?
etc etc etc

Unfortunately, it is more important to give out a bunch of job referrals than it is to make sure the client has a good resume or is able to hold their own in an interview. That is because whoever funds us desires "accountability" so everything has to be measured. It's not possible to measure the effect of talking with someone for 20 minutes and boosting their self-esteem, or helping them develop a resume that will get them to the next step. I love what I do, and get a lot of positive feedback from my customers. I could do without the statistics!

Kim

Thank you for your insight and I'm sorry to hear about that. Just remember that in the eyes of those you are helping you are not just a statistic and thanks to you, they don't feel like one either. Mireia R.

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Jasanpreet Kaur’s Answer

To know which career to opt for. The one in which you can thrive, be successful combine with sense of satisfaction and happiness.

#career #careerplanning

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Alwyn’s Answer

Having insight into how humans interact with computational devices and what triggers them to action. In effect, I would have wanted to study behavioral psychology and human factors - each with skills that would have enhanced my expertise.

Thank you for sharing! Mireia R.

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Dr. Ray’s Answer

Dear Mirela,


Your question really made me stop and think. I had very little idea of what it meant to work as a psychologist on a day to day basis. I originally wanted to teach at a university level but couln't get a job there. However, in retrospect I am glad i didn't go this route. Academic positions as a rule don't pay well and the politics and infighting among faculty members can be really vicious. After working in several mental health centers I went into private practice, which was immensely rewarding. However I wish I had known more about running a business. In addition to working with my clients I had to think about marketing, billing, paying taxes, etc., none of which was ever addressed in my training.


One of my professors told me "a degree is as good as your first job." Even if you are well prepared in a given field there will be many things you never thought of and have to learn once you start working, but this can be fun and needn't be unpleasant.


Thank you so much for sharing! Mireia R.

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John’s Answer

Good question, and a hard one because this will be different for everyone.

I wish I had taken more time in Highschool to better understand student loans, schooling options and career paths. I went to college based on a dream of playing college football and less of a vision around what I wanted to do for the next 40 years of my life. I tried finance, then international business before selecting Architecture as my major. When I came out of school I went into Sales and Entrepreneurship before landing with a corporate company where I found my passion is really in people leadership and development.

Looking back, I would have liked to taken some time to pull back, job shadow careers and then make a more educated decision on what I needed to enter that career field based on degree of choice and school. That would have saved me time and money and ultimately, lead me to my passion sooner. Hope this helps!

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Annie’s Answer

I wish I would have taken a class in negotiation because I think it would have helped me realize a higher earning potential earlier in my career. Just starting out after college, I was just happy to have a job and took what I was offered. As I got farther in my career, I became more aware of salary bands and the realities of how companies determine how much they pay individual employees. (I've always worked in very large, publicly owned corporations so it may be different at smaller businesses). I took a negotiations class as part of an MBA program several years after starting my career, and one of our role play assignments was negotiating salary and job benefits. I found the techniques I learned in that class really helped me push for larger salary increases during annual review periods or when I took on a new job or promotion.

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Marianne’s Answer

I always thought the most important thing was to do an outstanding job and if you did you would get rewarded. You do have to do an outstanding job, but this is only part of the equation. One important piece that I didn't understand until much later in my career is the value to two key resources: mentors and a network. For anyone newly starting in a career, I strongly recommend you develop these resources and cultivate them throughout your career. Find someone (preferably at a higher level) who is willing to mentor you. Don't be shy about asking someone if they would be willing to do this. Set up a regular schedule, such as monthly, every two months or quarterly. Come into the meeting with specific things you want to discuss and get input/guidance from your mentor. You also want to develop a strong network of people. It is often through this informal network that things get done. You also need to be your own Public Relations agent. It is not enough to do a good job, if others (including your boss) don't know what you are doing you will not get the recognition. One book I highly recommend everyone reads is Lean In by Sheryl Sandberg. Although women were the target audience, the concepts in the both apply to all.

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Cedric’s Answer

One of the big things I wish I paid more attention too was the fact that in your career you will sometimes take a step back or several of them in moving to where you want to be. Always see the bigger picture of what it is that you want to accomplish and realize up is not always up.

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Claire’s Answer

There is a lesson in everything you will do - especially in your first few years of working. Take the time to pause and reflect; learn the lesson that is right in front of you! Be HONEST when you make mistakes. No one expects you to be perfect, but they do expect you to be honest.

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Rachael’s Answer

Hi Mireia,

Great question. I hope you are getting value from each responders' piece of advice and are able to apply it to your career search. I wish I had completed more internships in my field prior to choosing the avenue I pursued. A major is extremely broad encompassing numerous positions across a variety of industries. I think the best way to determine if this would be a fit is to experience it and internships are a great way to accomplish this. I only completed one internship. I wish I could have completed at least a few so that I had a better idea of what the day to day was like in each position, in each industry so I could ensure the choice I made was truly the best fit for me.

Good luck,

Rachael


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Heather’s Answer

The importance of connections and building and maintaining your network throughout your career. This starts from the beginning and I think the more you get to know and put yourself in front of a diverse group of people and experiences from the beginning, the better off you are in the long run.

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Carly’s Answer

There are a few things I would have liked to have know prior to starting my career. However, with a career in Marketing would have been to get Advertising experience. As my career progressed, I realized individuals with Ad Experience often had more opportunities to get jobs and promotions because of the vast experience it brought them. Over the years as I have worked with different Ad Agencies I understand why. Ad Agency experience exposes you to a lot of different industries, company and customer challenges as well as creative outlets to solve problems and provide solutions. These are skills that are often untapped in organizations that have more structured environments. Exploring what you like about Marketing through Advertising is great experience and one that if I could have done before moving up in my career would have greatly build my skills and experience faster than more traditional routes.

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Navin’s Answer

Hi Mireia, This is an interesting question but there is no simple or one answer. I really like the different perspectives that others have shared. Career is a journey and an ever-learning experience and there could be so many things that you could wish you knew before choosing any career. At the end of the day, any career that you choose should be personally gratifying to you and the impact or influence that you make in other people's lives, directly or indirectly.

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Naimah’s Answer

Hi Mireia!


Thank you for a good question, that got me thinking...


There are always matters we realize in hindsight, and wish we knew before starting something. For me personally, I would say that I wish I knew the power of not being afraid to ask for help when needed.


I'm more of a shy person, in life and at work. I have come to see the value, and impact, of asking questions or for help when I need it. It's beneficial to those you are working for, as they get insight into your status or progress, or if you need additional assistance or resources. It's beneficial for you as you don't have to go about figuring things out on your own, you are able to share your thought process on a matter and get guidance on what the better or correct method would be.


So keep asking questions.


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Zach’s Answer

That the first few years into your career will be hard and not the funniest work. But remember, it's helping build a better foundation for later in life. Lastly, your 20's are hard and trust your gut when it comes to your career. If you are unhappy, then leave or find another opportunity that make you happy.


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Sunil’s Answer

I dont have the exact answer even after completing 13 years. one advice is always follow your interest, and dont worry if you dont know what you want to do at the start of the career. Majority of the people dont know this so you are not alone. On the job experience, signing up for new opportunities & keep exploring will eventually lead to the path where you wanted to go at the start. Its important that you follow your interest, but this journey of finding it is also very much important and helps a lot.

Thanks
Sunil

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Sangki’s Answer

Wow! This is an awesome question that made me keep thinking even I've been working for more than 18 years!
At the beginning of my career, what I'd thought was how I learn requirements from seniors or books even from experiences so that I could contribute to business. For now this is still the same thought that I have but business is much more complicated than I thought before, tough things make me harder were people or environment rather than what you do. Therefore, I am not sure if this would be a right answer but wanted to be prepared myself how to control & overcome things without stress.

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Debra’s Answer

Hi Mireia,

This is both a great question before and during your interview.
Your employment relationships can be likened to any other relationship (i.e., personal/family/business, etc.) so make sure you offer an appropriate give/take balance.
Good communication is crucial. Embrace emotional intelligence and be learn to stay focused during challenges and changes. Develop yourself.
Seek out mentors. Think quality over quantity. Sometimes 1-3 outstanding mentors can make all the difference.
Own up to any mistakes immediately offering the resolution when doing so. This builds trust and respect, qualities you should strive to give/receive.
You cannot please everyone. Remember, in life 50% of the people you meet will like you; 25% of those can change their mind. The remaining 50% of people you meet will not like you (for no good reason usually) but someone can also change that mindset. Learn to read these quickly and gravitate towards the people who like you and utilize those connections to develop and sharpen yourself rather than focus on negative encounters.
Smile and be welcoming.
Concentrate on work life balance. It takes diligence and commitment.
Follow today's be well work well advice (i.e., turn off your devices, manage stress, focus on your strengths, meditate, etc.)

Good luck in your endeavors!

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Maathangi’s Answer

Great question - It definitely made me stop and reflect. When I applied to grad school in Mechanical Engineering back in the day, I thought I'd be in a career in research for life. Little did I know back then that if you're just open to exploring new opportunities and pursue what you're passionate about, try to work in areas that align with your natural strengths, you might end up in a very different place!

I have since then moved onto a # of varied roles in data Science, product Management, an entrepreneur, and a yoga teacher too!

I'd say -- if I learned one thing, always keep asking yourself if you're happy where you are, keep exploring your different areas of interest, be kind to yourself & let life surprise you. Trust in your heart and let your mind lead you to exciting places.

Being highly open and flexible helps you attract the best things in life! :)

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Victoria’s Answer

Hi Mireira, I love your question and wish more people would ask these type of questions before starting their careers! Though many answers come to mind, to me the number one thing I wish I knew before starting my career was to have fun and travel a little before starting my full-time career.

It's important to work hard in college, work to obtain internships to gain experience, and work hard to develop your personal brand, but I wish I had taken some time to explore the world after college. You have the rest of your life to work, so don't wait until retirement to take time to get to know yourself outside of the college "bubble"!

Good Luck!

Victoria recommends the following next steps:

Get advice from trusted advisors and mentors about their experience.
Spend time thinking about the career you want to enter into and see how much work/life balance they provide.
Set personal goals and work hard to achieve them, along with your career goals!

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Kristen’s Answer

Internships are just as much about figuring out what you don't want to do as what you do. And there multiple paths you can take to find success. Sheryl Sandberg has some great insights on that concept in her book Lean In which I highly recommend to all recent college graduates.

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Leanne’s Answer

I wish I knew that it is ok to say no. When I started working, I thought saying no to a project or helping with a particular task would indicate that I was incapable of doing my job. This is NOT true! It may be uncomfortable to say no at first, but being aware of what is on your plate and how much more you can handle is critical so you don't burn yourself out. If you do happen to take on more than you think you can handle, talk with your supervisor or someone else you trust that has more experience. They can help you determine what tasks are most important and redistribute your work accordingly. Don't go at it alone!

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Prashant’s Answer

Does that really matter now. :-D
Most of us get into a job looking at the future prospects or if they are passionate. As long as the prospects are good or passion stays we cannot complain. Your cannot predict your career. You have to swim with the flow trying to adjust to the needs in the best possible manner.

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Sean’s Answer

What a great question!

You will have many jobs in your career, and they may or may not be directly related to each other. It's important to remember that you don't have to get stuck in something you hate, but that you can keep working toward finding something you love doing every day. Don't ever feel like your career is a giant monolithic thing -- it's more like smaller chunks, and every year or few years you can revisit what you're doing and change direction. Pivoting is entirely acceptable, and it's a great way to find joy.

Don't let the decisions overwhelm you and remember that you're never locked into a single path. I've worked in dry cleaning, espresso making, semiconductor manufacturing and software. You can keep fine-tuning what you're doing so that you can find your joy! YOU ARE NEVER LOCKED IN TO DOING WHAT YOU'RE DOING RIGHT NOW!

Remember -- this is all about you enjoying your life and finding challenges which are fun, and teams that you fit in to.

Keep learning what makes you happy, and keep striving toward doing what gives you joy!

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Gaurav’s Answer

Very interesting question. What I feel If I know what is long term path for the field I m choosing , what kind of efforts I need to put in to learn new things to grow in career also how to handle the office politics.

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Richard’s Answer

As a physician I wish I knew more about the business aspect of medicine. I would like to speak to hospital administration and insurance companies using the language of business so we could communicate more effectively.

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Steven Brandon’s Answer

My answer might seem overly-simplistic, and it is, in a way. Make a plan.
I didn't have a plan when I got into college, nor when I graduated. I was just kind of treading water waiting for something to happen. Your guidance counselor will tell you that your college major will change 3 or 4 times before graduation, and he/she is probably right. That shouldn't stop you from making a plan. It's okay if your plan changes, but you must have a plan. It doesn't matter how many times your plan changes, as long as you are following a plan.

Regarding your plan, get as specific as possible early on. It's not enough to simply say "I want to be a developer". You should be saying "I want to work for a specific company, developing certain technology, to help solve a specific problem". The more granular you become in your plan, the quicker you'll realize if you still want to stick to that plan. If not, make a new plan.

I hope this helps you on your journey. Best of luck to you!

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John’s Answer

Mireia,

Great question!

There is so much I learned during my first years working.

One of the biggest things I learned was that politics do matter. How people perceive your intentions can be as important as your intentions. This isn't to say everyone is out to get you because they aren't! I had many great mentors help me along the way. However, there were several times when people mistook my intentions and it took a lot of work to "win" them back. So, when you go out into the workforce (or even before) try to think of how your actions will be perceived ahead of time and make adjustments to improve the likelihood of your actions being successful.

John recommends the following next steps:

Plan
Review
Act
Review

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Preeti Jose’s Answer

Hi Mireia, thank you for the question. Honestly, one thing that I wish I knew before I started my career is chasing something you love doing versus something that gives you money or is the hot favourite of your peers.

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Kedar’s Answer

The one thing I wish I knew before I started my career is "How to make an impact using specific words in minimum amount of time"

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Darren’s Answer

I have given this piece of advice many times. When you finally pick your field get a mentor in that field. Ask questions about development that can lead you to the next level. Trying to figure out what you want to do a number of years down the road can be difficult but if you have somebody to help you understand how to get from entry level positions to positions at better pay levels will lead to success.

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Chloe’s Answer

I would suggest before deciding your career choice, explore and talk to people who work in the industry that you’re interested. Don’t decide it because of any reason that is not motivated by you, like ‘oh many people chose that career to start with and I can make a lot of money from that’. Choose the career that you truly feel interested or passionate about. It is hard to switch and it will not be an enjoying experience if you’re doing something that you don’t like. So think more before stepping out the first move, and after that, go for it and take your steps!

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Renata’s Answer

I would advice myself: Work on your communication skills. No matter where the chosen career will take you - you will need to express your thoughts in a clear way. You will meet many different types of people: technical geeks, management, people leaders. Being able to deliver your thoughts to any audience or colleague is crucial to your success.

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Naveed’s Answer

I wish I knew the importance of certifications, I just thought a college and university degree is enough in your career. I stopped studying after university, which was a big mistake I made.


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Kimberly’s Answer

One thing I wish was knew before starting my career was learning how to set appropriate boundaries for myself. There would be times when I was constantly working and never took a break. I would skip lunch just to finish a project when that was not a healthy habit to get use to. As I got older, I realized I needed to set those boundaries as to when is it time to work and when I should take appropriate breaks. There are times when I have to shorten my lunch break to finish a task but I made sure to take the time to make a meal that will reenergize me to complete the task. Even from reading all the comments previous to mine, they are all giving some great advice and for me, I am finding them helpful for someone still young in their career. Good luck with your journey and hope this helps!

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Lucie’s Answer

Hi Mireia!

I wish I knew what is my job interest like at the moment of defining my university major. With school background it helps you better understand the field itself. But I was still undecided "child" at that moment. Anyway it is great to keep yourself educated also while working so new options new challenges and new direction makes you more perfect. ;)

But there is one more thing... I know it is very attracting to start your work career, to become independent and to drive your life from that moment but I wish I could take a few months break, relax, travel with friends after I graduated. Enjoy your free time now because once you start working you will not have that many chances anymore. Your personal time will become as the most valuable asset...

Hope this helps! Good luck in your career!



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Vipul’s Answer

Importance of coding. Yes, I didn't know the importance of programming and coding until I started preparing for a job switch. Everywhere companies are expecting engineers to have coding experience and I must say they are not wrong.

Automation is the need of the hour. Manual work is slow and full of erorrs(pun intended). You need to have programming knowledge to automate tests. Agile work flow necessitates us to deliver a change as quickly as possible. What was earlier expected in weeks is now being delivered in hours thanks to devOps. Every stage of such a system has to be automated to achieve continuous integration and delivery. So there remains no scope for an engineer who doesn't know how to write efficient codes.

(Of course software developers also need to know programming by default)

Vipul recommends the following next steps:

Pick up any beginner level programming book of Head First series.

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Emilee’s Answer

I wish I had known that it's ok to start in one career and make changes along the way. I started my career in public accounting and after thinking about what I like most about my job it led me to switch into a human resources role at the same company. You never know where your career will take you, so don't be afraid to make changes and say yes to various opportunities along the way.


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Stephen’s Answer

How important it was to be able to adapt to change and be resilient.

Also, how important networking and building a strong brand for yourself is.

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Jamie’s Answer

Take time to discover what drives you and what you are passionate about. Dont jump into a major or career path without doing research. See your end goal and have a plan. Try to be specific in what you want to do. Dont just pick a major to pick a major. Think it through.

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Jon’s Answer

I wish I knew how to ask the right questions when interviewing for a company. Make sure to ask all the questions you want to know while interviewing. Be very curious and if something doesn't sound right, follow your gut. Make sure everything you say in an interview is positioning yourself in a positive light.


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Rachel’s Answer

Thats a great question!! I would say the one thing I wish I knew before starting my career was that your career may not just be 1 single occupation (like it was a generation or two ago), but is likely to span a few different industries and roles. Be curious, try new things and be open to new opportunities.

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Emilio’s Answer

I wish I got an earlier start on looking for positions related to my career. As an accountant I did not realize that many of the big firms recruit students so early and the amount of opportunities there are to get a head start.

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James’s Answer

4 different consultant answers below:

1. Understanding all of the career options available
2. Understanding how important the building blocks (steps) are to your career in the long term
3. Exploring your interests because the learning will never stop, and don't worry too much about where you start
4. Do NOT expect to be a superstar on Day 1, everyone learns through experience

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Christina’s Answer

Starting your very first job can be a little overwhelming but it is a very exciting time. Here are a few of things I wish I knew before starting my first job:

- It's okay to ask questions
- It's okay to make mistakes, but learn from them
- You can learn something from every situation (bad/good)
- It's important to build your support team/network


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Joey’s Answer

Really great question! I would say that being risk averse or overly cautious when making decisions can sometimes hold you back as opposed to help you accelerate your career growth and it's something I would of done sooner If I could have. Particularly as a leader or manager in a business, you have to take risks sometimes. Trust yourself and learn from the challenges you encounter along the way!

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Sandi’s Answer

Choose what you're passionate about. If you enjoy what you're doing, it's not work. Also there are so many more jobs out there than you realize until you get into the business world.

Sandi recommends the following next steps:

Once you identify what you're passionate about start asking around what kind of jobs are in that area.

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Ching’s Answer

I would suggest you do as much research as possible, including internships and attending meetups, to get an understanding of what the career is going to be. Also, be prepared to join the workforce. That means understanding the expectations of being at work and have coworkers and a boss.

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Jodi’s Answer

I wish I would of started my pharmaceutical career right of out of college . I also wish I knew more about internships while I was in college .

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Sarah’s Answer

Take you time to research and choose the career you want. Time is everything, don't waste it on work you may not enjoy.

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Kedar’s Answer

The one thing I wish I knew before I started my career is "How to make an impact using specific words in minimum amount of time"

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Jason’s Answer

I wish I had known how to find mentorship sooner. Getting help with my career path opened new doors and helped me plan my progression.

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Haley’s Answer

Hi Mireia. One thing I wish I could tell my younger self would be that you don't need to follow a linear career path. Most of my childhood/young adult life I thought that I would get a job and work up the ladder similar to what I thought my dad did. When I started my career I would talk to as many people as I could that were in jobs I was interested in to learn what their career path was. Most to all of them described what I thought was a hap-hazard path. None of them were linear. They just followed opportunities and took chances. I found this really frustrating, that there wasn't one right answer or one single path. It took me a while and listening to dozens of similar stories before it sunk in that I every decision I make is my career path and that I should make the best decision I can with the information I have at the moment. Early in my career I made career changes based on trying new things and avoiding things I didn't like. I eventually found the things that I love and now I'm making career decisions based on challenging myself to get better at those things. Along this path, I've changed careers multiple times, but I've kept advancing and now that I've found a company and a job that I love all those decisions were what brought me here.... in probably the most non-linear way :)

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Jordan’s Answer

I wish I knew the importance of asking questions. Often times, when people start a new role, they try and stay in the background and blend in, however, that is the optimal time to ask questions in order to better understand what you should be doing.


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Amrita’s Answer

Hi,

One of the most important things I have learnt is that the pursuit of knowledge is a life-long activity. As a TAC engineer working at Cisco, we work with cutting edge technologies which define the market. Often, it feels like as soon as we have mastered a new technology, we fall back to riding the tail-end of whatever new technology is trending; which is frustrating for someone looking to gain expertise through their work.

This attitude of wanting to know how everything works was shaped by my experience at university, where much of the focus was placed on fact-gathering; something I brought with me when I started at Cisco.

In the current job market, it is important to adopt a mindset which fosters lifelong learning. Focus on gaining expertise in a single discipline, but continue to learn horizontally across different sectors. There are many new, emerging fields which necessitate a union of career paths, such as Fintech (requiring knowledge of finance and data science), so having a growth mindset is essential.

As you continue through life, don't forget to take a look at the world around you through a different lens. To truly appreciate your purpose in your chosen career, it is important to understand how systems work at a higher level so you can see how you fit in, and articulate that to others who are unfamiliar with your discipline.

Don't bask in the glory of past success. Personal achievement is something to be celebrated and recognized, but it should be viewed as a stepping stone for your continued personal growth. As you gain seniority through your career, it is important to continue to ask questions, even those which may be perceived as ignorant in respect to your current standing in the workplace.

There is no substitute for hard work. There are many people who will be far more talented than you, and there are times where you may suffer from inferiority complex, but if you are passionate and hungry to learn, you will be unstoppable.

Best wishes,

Amrita

Amrita recommends the following next steps:

Write down what you feel passionate about. If you don't know, be open to new experiences. Rely on your intuition to figure out whether something is working well for you or not. If it doesn't bring you personal satisfaction, abandon it and try something else.
Don't be scared to try new things. Understand what drives you and focus on your strengths. Continue to learn, even if you feel unmotivated. Persistence in anything is key.

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Jessica’s Answer

Well I just started my job in the last month or so, and there are a couple things that I wish I knew before starting, but I think the most important is how important your friends and family will be as you transition into working life. Transitioning into being a real adult and working full time, is a big adjustment from college. I went from living on campus surrounded by friends to living in an apartment alone. I realized quickly that I needed my friends and family to keep me grounded more than anything. Whether it is a phone call home, dinner with an old friend, or yoga class with some buddies, these are the things that have supported me and helped me the most while starting my job. So that was kind of long winded, but I guess my advice is to keep in touch with your friends and family and make sure to make time for them in your life! I hope this helps and good luck with everything!


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Alnaya’s Answer

Hi! I recently graduated from college and just began my career. I think I can help you out from my experience. I would say to keep your options open! My major was accounting and I decided at the last minute to not pursue the traditional accounting career path. Luckily, I completed 5 internships throughout college. Therefore, I knew what I wanted in a career. By the way, complete at least 1 internship during college. This will give you an idea on what you want to pursue after college. You also get a taste of various office environments. This is important! You want to work in an atmosphere that is not toxic! Depending on your career choice, you may have to decide on an industry. Narrow down your top 3 or 5 industries. Writing down what your must-haves on a list helps tremendously! I did this and so far I like how my career is starting.





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Pallavi’s Answer

Hello Mireia,

I wish I asked this question when I started by career and received the guidance. Over the years I have learnt:

  1. Most of us get intimidated when we are in a large group; not everyone is an ace in public speaking. There's always a fear; how will I be judged. This sometimes leaves us with situation where we get the half-baked information or no clarity at all. I have learnt, no matter what, if there is a doubt, never ever hesitate to ask a question. There maybe someone else in the room who has the similar concern and your question helps to get more details.
  2. Learn to say NO. We tend to go over and beyond when trying to please others and doing this, we end up taking more stuff in our plate than we can manage. Understand your capacity/ bandwidth first before accepting anything new. Saying NO will not get you a negative feedback; it is always better than not being able to deliver.

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