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What will make you stand out at a job interview?

Hey! I was just wondering what could make me stand out a little when I go to a job interview. Would it be something that I would say, something that I would do, or something else? Thank you! #business #medicine #teaching #law #technology #interviews #information-technology #customer-service


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Dave’s Answer

I've interviewed a lot of candidates in my career and the ones who stood for me were the candidates who did their research on the company, did their research on me by checking out my LinkedIn profile, and did their research on the job they were pursuing.
A good recruiter will provide a candidate a written description of the role they're interviewing for, and a standout candidate is one who shows up for the interview with a thorough understanding of what the job entails. A standout candidate will go that extra mile by taking the time to ask me what the most pressing problems or opportunities are that exist in the organization, and describe what they will do to help solve the problems or capitalize on the opportunities. A standout candidate will have a 30, 60 , 90 day plan in mind for getting up to speed on the job once they are hired.
There are a few ideas for you. Best of luck in your career- go get 'em !


Thank you so much for your help, Mr. Ramanauskas! I appreciate all of the tips that you gave me, I will definitely keep them in mind at any job interviews that I go to! Angelina P.

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Steven’s Answer

Great question here are my suggestions, remember this is how you sell yourself to the interviewer as a person.

1) Learn about the company you are interviewing for, easy to research on the internet. If you know someone there, get some info that you can share with the interviewer
2) Work on your speaking and communication style, you have to adapt to the interviewer to build trust and confidence. It's not about you it's about them.
3) Come to the interview with questions for the interviewer (what are the expectations of the me in the role, how do you see the person you hire for this role being successful, if this is the supervisor doing the hiring then ask them how they would like to be communicated with, what's good what's not so good,
4) Pay attention to the interviewers decorations, ask some questions at the right time or use it for initial conversation points until the interview starts
5) Sit forward on the edge of your chair
6) Maintain a comfortable eye contact
7) Dress better than they expect. Always go above and beyond expectations.

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Cheryl’s Answer

Be excited & positive!
Do your research about the company you are interviewing with. You will be able to be more confident in answering their questions and can gear your answers to relate to their work environment and lingo.
Be authentic! .... having a smile on your face and a contradicting tone will not leave the impression you are hoping to leave with your interviewer.
Establish a connection with the interviewer.
Establishing a connection, whether it be you attended the same college or liking the same professional sports teams, anything that will allow you to have a genuine conversation to show the interviewer your personality and positivity.
Dress for the job and company. It is important to look the part you want the interviewer to hire you for.
Show up at least 10 minutes before your interview. You are interviewing for a job that needs you to be timely and prepared, show up to the interview that way .
Non verbal queues speak louder than verbal queues, practice good non verbal communication while practicing answering the common interview questions. ( I highly recommend looking over a book like 101 great answers to the toughest interview questions to help you prepare)

This article lays out some pretty basic points to help you get hired.
https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/job-interview-tips

Best Wishes to all!


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Govardhan (Geo)’s Answer

There are few important things to remember always when you are going for a interview. Attire, Smile and confidence on your face and finally you should be good at your subject.
When you first step inside the interview room the interviewer looks at you before even interview starts. So your attire is important. You should look confident and greet interviewer with a smile to make yourself comfortable and the interviewer.
The most important part of your interview is when actually it starts. You should know very clearly about your strengths and how your strengths are going to help you in the job role and the company. Highlight your strengths briefly when you are describing about yourself how its going to help in the job you do.
Lastly know the job responsibilities and do research a lot before you attend any interview. Prepare yourself a lot don't take it easy as there are many smart charms out there trying to stand out from the crowd.
Always remember the time you are having fun somebody is practicing hard somewhere to stand on top of you.


Thanks for the answer! It was very helpful! Angelina P.

What Geo said is just right, not too much information and the information given is helpful. Gil Figueroa

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Ripon’s Answer

Here are few unique ways to make your job interview stand out. Cue the curtain rise.


If you’ll be asked to problem-solve, consider bringing a drawing sheet and illustrating your approach.


During your prep, think of a “theme” that encompasses your career arc and skills. Then reference that theme throughout the interview.


Look out for small but impactful ways to make an impression, like helping an assistant make copies.


Got a group interview? These tips will make you the most memorable in the pack.


Tell a story to the hiring manager to get your own happy ending.


If you can, leave something behind so your interviewer has a physical memory of your meeting.


Don’t switch “off” from interview mode until you leave the parking lot.
It’s not curtain-call yet! Check out how to write a memorable thank-you card.


And finally, read up on the 10 most memorable (and not in a good way) interview moments.


Source :https://www.themuse.com/advice/10-ways-to-make-sure-the-interviewer-remembers-you-in-a-good-way


Thank you for your answer! Quick question: you recommended leaving something behind so that the interviewer has a physical memory. would you recommend bringing flowers or bakery, etc, or something else? Thanks again! Angelina P.

Its not necessary that it has to be an object . What i meant is an long lasting impression . Ripon Ghosh

Ohhh, thank you for clarifying that for me! I looked at the articles that you included, and I saw what you meant. Thanks! Angelina P.

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Mary’s Answer

The best thing to do is be prepared. Do your research on the company and ask questions based on what you learned about the company. Be excited about the job! Ask questions as the interview is also for you to decide if you would be a good fit. Use action verbs. Dress is important always dress in professional attire. Smile and be confident. If you want the job. Ask for it! Also be sure to send a thank you email highlighting your skills and indicating your desire for the position.


Those are all great ideas, thank you so much! Angelina P.

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Anne’s Answer

Great question! When you begin your job search, take the time to think about the expertise that you possess, education that you completed, experience that you have and activities that you love to do. The more that you "fit" the job, the easier that it will be to stand out. For example, I have worked in the consumer tech industry in marketing for many years. When I joined Verizon, I had many things to talk about that made me stand out during the interview. Also, take the time to make a list of how your experience aligns with the job requirements before you start the interviewing process. Many first interviews are over the phone, so you can keep the list in front of you to remind you of the accomplishments as the interviewer is asking you questions. This will make you comfortable during the interview process. Also, practice answering questions concisely (to the point). Employers are looking for people who are comfortable communicating on the phone and in written communication.

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Janet’s Answer

Hi Angelina,

1) Your initial connection / first impression.
This link is great and I use all of these suggestions when I go to a new client. Especially #8 "Find a Connection"
https://www.themuse.com/advice/8-ways-to-make-a-great-first-impression-at-an-interview

2) Prepare two questions to ask at the end of the interview.
I went through a great round of interviews for a position once - in the end, they gave me the feedback that I didn't get the job because I didn't ask them questions, so they assumed I wouldn't ask good questions as I did the job.
This link has excellent options:
https://biginterview.com/blog/2011/08/best-questions-to-ask-end-interview.html
I recommend questions 7, 8 and 9.

Wish you the best!
Janet
#first-impressions #ending-the-job-interview

This was very helpful, thank you so much! Angelina P.

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Thomas’s Answer

Some of my personal tips on to stand out on interviews:

Exude Confidence
Do you homework by researching the position and the company beforehand
Know your resume and be prepared to answer any questions on it
Ask intelligent and relevant questions
Write a thank you letter afterwards that is tailored for each Interviewer


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Hitesh’s Answer

You should attend the job interview with a positive frame of mind. Should reflect confidence in your voice and your body language. You should start the interview by giving greeting to the interviewer. Just acknowledge the interviewer's questions by giving verbal nod irrespective of whether you know the answer or not as it will give an impression to interviewer that you are a good listener. Prepare thoroughly for the technical part and ensure you have reviewed all job description and studied somewhat about company history.


Hitesh recommends the following next steps:

Attend the job interview with a positive attitude and confidence in your voice. That also reflects with your body language
Be prepared with a decent knowledge about the company
Always acknowledge the interviewer's questions by giving verbal nod and then take time to answer them based on your experience/ knowledge
Be thoroughly prepared with the job description and ensure you have practical examples to share about the job duties you have disclosed in your resume. This gives good impression to the interviewer

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Omani’s Answer

Hi Angelina. I know it can be scary and challenging going on interviews. Allow me to mention a few things that you may not find on typical Google searches.

-eat some potassium prior, for example a banana. This fruit stimulates the mind, gives energy and allows a state of calmness.

-sit at the edge of the sit, proper posture, yet relaxed as much as possible.

-smile as often as you can, sincere smiles, not forced.

-have a personal story you have overcame and relate it to your aim in being successful.

it's ok if you stumble, say your apologies and keep flowing. Remember they are humans and know we all make mistakes. Be honest, and think of ways that can stand you outside of the box. And I KNOW you will be successful! Ask prior of you can do some reconnaissance on the company prior in a office visit to understand company culture and values.
#studyunknownfactsofcompany #beunique #youaregreat #rememberthat

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Lloyd M.’s Answer

Preparation and confidence makes you stand out in a job interview. Ensure that you know what the details are of the job you are applying for and how your skill set would make you a good fit for the position. Learn about the company and be able to talk about its successes and culture (Google is your friend). Also create a list of accomplishments that you can share for the interviewer to review after the interview. You can't fit all the good things about you and your experience on a resume so have additional documentation for the interviewer/hiring manager to review to get to know things about you that your resume won't contain.

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Kim’s Answer

I always tell my employees, you must bring energy to your interview. I once held an interview day, where I had 13 interviews in one day. By the time I made it to my last scheduled interview, I was exhausted. The last candidate unfortunately had no energy. His speech was very monotone, facial expressions very stoic and his entire presence lacked energy. Ultimately, I was bored through his interview. The candidate could have been the best one of the day, but when it was all said and done, the only thing I could remember from his interview was how low energy he was and so he was immediately removed from my pool of candidate. I always tell my employees, you have no idea what your interviewers day looked like, bring energy and be memorable!

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Noorayaz’s Answer

Know the company you are applying to. What do they do? What do they sell and how do they differentiate themselves. Call in and ask to speak to someone already in a similar role. Most people are willing to help and you can get valuable insight. Hiring managers want someone who is driven, resourceful and committed. Doing some extra legwork on the front end and weaving what you learned into your plan for the role - will definitely set you apart from most people.

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Charles’s Answer

Looking into your work history, jot down 15 major accomplishments. Commit these areas to your memory. You will be able to fit in each of these when interview questions send you to your memory of these accomplishments. Fit them into your answers and expand your reply with creative additions. Throughout the interview, use action words and describe your abilities in terms of the actions you are capable of. Be strong with your confidence in what you can accomplish.

Be sure to write up 3 detailed questions that makes you ready when they ask you what your questions are. Be sure to do your homework and be able to talk about the company that you want to work for. If you have a portfolio of your work areas, bring it with and refer to it with an exciting presentation of your working accomplishments.

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Paola’s Answer

Hi,
I used to work in HR and here are the few tips:
* Be there on time
* Don't take your phone
* Don't chew gum
* Be prepared with questions
* Look presentable, skirt and tie didn't hurt anybody
* LISTEN to the question before answering
* Short and sweet answers are acceptable unless they ask you to expand
* If you are nervous, be up front and let them know you are a bit nervous
* Even if your resume doesn't have much experience let them know that you are trainable and have a positive attitude
* Maintain eye contact and don't forget to smile

Hope this helps you!

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Michelle’s Answer

There really isn't a scripted guide to interviews. I warn people first of all that a positive interview does not guarantee that you will be hired. On the other hand, a negative interview can prevent you from getting that job. Therefore if you want to stay in the running for a position, prepare for the interview.

Preparation takes many forms. First of all, learn all about the company and the industry. This will make the interview into a discussion rather than question and answer session which in turn lowers stress. Make a list of relevant subjects that you could discuss and use as examples. Be sure to dress nicely for the interview; personal grooming is important and shows that you care about yourself and are really serious about the interview/opportunity. Lastly, practice, practice, practice. Employ your friends and family and have them interview you. Answer the questions with eye contact and maybe even while looking in a mirror. This will let you also see your facial expressions and mannerisms. The more you practice, the more at ease you will be and the better your interview will be.

Good luck!

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Pallavi’s Answer

  1. Be humble
  2. Be honest - do not hesitate to share with the interviewer your shortfalls (if asked) or any negative experience, however, ensure to explain what you learnt from the experience and how you will work towards to make that a positive.
  3. How presentable you are - this broadly talks about your sense of dressing, confidence, the way to talk.
  4. Be precise - interviewers are expecting how well and short you can put your thoughts across. They do not want to hear a narration.

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Matt’s Answer

What would make you stand out in an interview?

Prepare concrete examples of instances when you have gone above and beyond. For example. problems you have found solutions to overcome, working with challenging colleagues. or taking initiative. Chances are you will be able to incorporate these example into your responses for various interview questions. Without concrete examples, interviewers are more likely to interpret your responses as generic, thus making you blend into the sea of other applicants.

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Vijay’s Answer

While, I think most of the important aspects have already been covered in terms of preparedness, dressing, confidence, body language, knowledge about the role/company you're applying for/to. I'd like to just add that be direct and honest in your answers and never try to bluff. It is much better to say No, or that you have not got a chance to work on something or you'd be happy to work on something new, than make up answers. Be courteous and thank your interviewer for his time. Asking questions about the role/company, makes your interest known to the interviewer.

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Nitin’s Answer

Hi,
There is no shortcut answer to the question.
I would say How you reflect on your resume, How yo answer the questions, confidence, and how do you sell your self in terms of your tract record of previous work done at different company, how you have solved challenging problem,technical and business acumen etc. all adds up. Also It depends on the type of interview you are going to attend.

same applies to fresher candidate as well but candidate has to sell him/her self in terms of academic record, impressing the Interviewer with right answers, good attitude etc.

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Sneha’s Answer

Its the X factor. What else do you do in your life besides your main job? What other Ventures/Adventures are you embarking on in your personal life? Because people who live exciting lives naturally draw other people to them without having to try harder. And your confidence shows.


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Gaurav’s Answer

I have interviews many folks and here are few things which I feel are very important.

1) Get a good idea about the company or department for which you are giving interview.
2) If you know about interviewer , Please check his/her LinkedIn profile and get his specialization
3) Go through the job description and align your skills with the profile and try to highlight it
4) Give the answer with some real time examples.


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Elizabeth’s Answer

Among all the important recommendations above, remember to be yourself and let them know what makes you unique.

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Sheila’s Answer

Hello Angelina:

I find that if you are prepared, confident and being yourself you're off to a good start. I agree with the previous posters and would like to provide you with an article I hope you find helpful. . . https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/11-unusual-ways-to-stand-out-in-a-job-interview/

I wish you much success on your journey. Don't forget to smile. :)

~ Sheila


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Paul’s Answer

From my experience for those who have stood out from job interviews I have conducted are: 2) research and demonstrating knowledge of the company interviewing with, 2) research on my background, 3) research and questions on the position, 4) reached out to other colleagues in the industry to get their thoughts, 5) being transparent about lack of knowledge or skills but the enthusiasm to learn something new, 6) having interesting skills or hobbies to show a well rounded person beyond the job itself, 7) being able to communicate effectively.

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Steve’s Answer

When it comes to interviewing we all get nervous! The best advice I can give you is to prepare in advance. Have a polished resume and a plan, bring them to the interview. Part of planning and getting prepared is to do your homework. Spend time researching the job and talking to those in position. You need to know the job before you know it is the right fit for both of you. Lastly, give it your best!

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Jackie’s Answer

Hello Angelina!

The most important part of the interview process is the first step which is first impressions;

First impressions are the key to nailing the first round of an interview so think about your appearance and make sure it is appropriate for the job you are approaching. The second part of this process is to brush up on facts about yourself, almost as if you're memorizing a biography from your resume so that you have something to discuss from the start of the interview. For example ask yourself the 4 W's when coming up with questions like:

"What are some of your biggest strengths"
"Why do you believe your experience/skills are qualified for this job"
"When was a time that you solved a difficult problem/task"
"Where did you gain your knowledge and skills"

And of course other questions to ask these are just some basics they may ask you during your interview especially because the first round is of an interview is all about the potential employee impressing the employer and why you should be in that position over every other applicant. Asking yourself these questions prepares you for your answers to each question. I would also suggest thinking of stories to go along with your skills or giving them examples of how you solved that problem with a guest or how you created a filing system at work when things got out of order/unorganized, etc., When speaking with an employer it's always good to have good posture and eye contact, making sure that they are your number one priority. Once you have wowed them with your professional mannerisms, skills, and qualifications, they will notice how dedicated you are to working that position. Adding a little character and charisma works as well so that you leave something that reminds them of you when deciding on applicants.

If you get a call back interview, this is the time where they want you to work for them and they want to see if their accommodations match yours. This would be discussing what you know about the company, and yes that means you should definitely research facts to impress them because they already know your skills now they want to know if their place of work is right for you. Also make sure you have the ability to work the hours they offer because typically this is what they look for in an applicant as well.

Sometimes they may have enough hiring manager give you a call for a third interview, or if not they usually take up to 2-3 weeks to give you a call back so don't stress the jobs can still be yours!

If there's a third interview, it's best to make yourself most knowledgeable and professional as can be because this may be an interview with a very professional business employee. This may also be an important time to research this employee on websites such as Linked In to get an idea of them and ask them questions about themselves and their careers. THIS IMPRESSES ALMOST MOST BUSINESS HIRING MANAGERS!

Whenever they ask you if you have any questions for them, the more you have the better.

Good Luck!

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Victoria’s Answer

Always be knowledgeable of the company and do not be afraid to think out side of the box when answering questions. Employers want people who can problem solve and bring new fresh ideas to hard questions.

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Thulasinathan’s Answer

Here is the Mantra!

What gets you foot in the door is your technical/professional skills, but what gets you hired is your ATTITUDE!

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Brittany’s Answer

There are a couple things that you can do to help you stand out in an interview:

1. Be Yourself - Show your personality and be human.
2. Do your Research - Know about the company, the position, the potential hiring manager
3. Preparation - Bring questions to the interview that show you are interested and passionate about your future role.

In addition to these things practice and work on your confidence. Make eye contact and have good posture.

Brittany recommends the following next steps:

Contact and Interview someone or several others in the same role you are applying for.
Practice interview questions with a mentor.

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Ambur’s Answer

Candidates that stand out to me tend to take charge of the interview. They are engaged, come prepared with questions for me, the job, and the company.

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Lloyd M.’s Answer

Preparation and confidence makes you stand out in a job interview. Ensure that you know what the details are of the job you are applying for and how your skill set would make you a good fit for the position. Learn about the company and be able to talk about its successes and culture (Google is your friend). Also create a list of accomplishments that you can share for the interviewer to review after the interview. You can't fit all the good things about you and your experience on a resume so have additional documentation for the interviewer/hiring manager to review to get to know things about you that your resume won't contain.

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Katy’s Answer

Know your audience, research the interviewee and personalize your answers and questions to what is important to them.  Research and preparation show that you want the job and are interested in the next step. And if you want to move on ask to move on. Be confident but not egotistical and go after what you want.  


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Harpreet’s Answer

Hey Angelina,

I'll keep this short as you've got tons of great advice! When I've interviewed job applicants, the single most important thing that sets candidates apart is being able to demonstrate a genuine interest in the role at the company. Sometimes 'genuine interest' will be called passion, excitement, showing interest etc.

And to demonstrate genuine interest, you need to want the job you're going for and do lots of practice with friends/family (and ask them for feedback on this point).

Good luck!

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Christina’s Answer

You are only sitting in the interview room because you have the necessary skills for the job, just like everyone else being interviewed. You can stand out in the following ways -

-Positive attitude and friendly (people are predisposed to work with people they like/the want to be around)
-be prepared. know the job, know the company
-have questions prepared
-be excited. companies want people who want to be there

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Chrissy’s Answer

Job interviews can be intimidating, but remember that they're trying to determine if you're a good fit just as much as you're trying to determine if that company/role is a good fit for you. A few tips to stand out:

-Do your research. Know the leadership team, general company history, and any recent news surrounding the company. Being informed and able to speak to these topics will make it easier for your interviewers to envision you in that role.

-Don't lose your personality. Be professional in the way you dress and behavior, but stay true to who you are. Chemistry with the interviewers and your future team are as much as factor as your skills and experience.

-Follow up after the interview. Sending thank you notes to your interviewers and recruiter will go a long way, even if you're not selected for the position.

Best of luck to you!

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Brian’s Answer

I've interviewed for two internships before. I've found that having a pen and pad can establish your intent to take notes and study the company that you're hopeful of working with. In addition, "sir" and "ma'am" go a long way when it comes to meeting business professionals for the first time.

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Ari’s Answer

Do research on the company and the person that will be interviewing you because it will set you apart from other candidates and tell the person that is interviewing you that you are serious about the job that you are pursuing. Along with that, make sure that include some of the college courses that you have taken on your resume that will be relevant to the job that you are pursing. Most of all be personable! I was in an interview a couple of weeks ago and the gentleman that was interviewing me asked me what I like to do in my free time. I said I like to spend time with my mom, dog and friends. We ended up talking about dogs and I wanted to show a picture but my professionalism stopped me. Unfortunately he told me that his dog passed away last year, but that told me how close knit the work environment was without really asking. Its important to find out how you relate to someone on a professional level as well as on a personal level. The second interview I had went well because I included the fraternity that I am a brother of (its co-ed) and the gentleman said he knew exactly what it was which told him that community service is very important to me and I knew that was a value of the company so it gave me a little bit of an edge. Always remember not to ramble but give a specific answer and never say more than you need to. If they want you to elaborate they will ask you to.

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Virat’s Answer

Let me answer this in the points below, they add up to make you standout until & otherwise your skill set matches 100% with the position you are looking forward for & you are a master with those skills which is not a practical scenario:

1. First thing first-the look. Be present in a good descent attire. It doesn't enhance your skills but shows your readiness & interest for the job.

2. Job description: Have the correct understanding of the requirement & skill sets. Have an idea on the skill sets at the least which you might not have experience with.

3. Company History: Spend some time on reading about the company you are appearing for.

4. Say No: We are all humans & might not know everything. If you have no idea on a certain topic, be open to say No.

5. Strengths: Have a fair idea in your mind about the strengths you have out of the desired skills & take your chance to talk around them. Mention any related achievements.

6. Make the flow: Try to get questions rather being asked questions. If you could do this, you are in for the job if you have applied for the wright skill set :)

7. Communication & Attitude: Be a good & polite speaker. Practice for the intro if you are new to the interviews. Maintain a good attitude & be willing to learn for the missing skills required for the job.

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Nathan’s Answer

Great question. I have been on both sides of the table when it comes to interviewing and the difference on both sides is preparation.

An interview is a two way street and both parties need to make sure that the position, company and the people you are working with will be a good fit. You should be preparing today for the position that you want next in order to improve your chances of succeeding in your interview. Skills, relationships and knowledge should always be growing to further your career. The candidates that I tended to hire had done their research on the company, the position, the market and even some of the people using tools like LinkedIn. They were confident because they were educated and knew that they were there to not only showcase why there were a good fit for the role but to determine if it was a good fit for them. They would come in prepared and you can determine that with ease.

The second story comes from the position I am in today. I was leaving one large company for another and had my eye on Verizon for quite some time. Finally, when an opportunity came available in the area we wanted to live and it seemed to be a good fit, I hit the next gear in terms of preparation. I had always worked on personal growth and knew that preparedness would be key, especially coming from the outside of Verizon. I had reached out to someone in the same position via LinkedIn. He had been with Verizon for some time and then moved into this role and I wanted to know why and what his thoughts were now that he was in the position. I studied wireless industry statistics, such as market share and demographics for the area the position covered and I even shopped in some of the retail locations to get an idea for the positions opportunities. I was told that my preparation was a key piece of why I was hired. You can never over prepare for an interview.

Be authentic
Be curious
Be intentional with questions and answers


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MONIQUE’s Answer

Hi Angelina,

I think that is a great question. What I have found that makes an individual stand out is what are you doing differently that young adults like yourself may not be doing.

When I finished college, I didn't know which direction I wanted to go. I had studied communications with a focus in advertising, but really wanted to do marketing. I was lost in my journey and even though this is something most young adults don't have the opportunity for, I moved overseas as I was able to work in Europe as I was born there. I ended up gaining so much international experience, learning about different cultures and what an international business looks like that I was able to translate that into the conversations that I was having with companies.

What are you passionate about? Do you have any awards that you are proud of? Any experiences that can set you apart? Always be yourself and feel confident when you speak to the companies you are looking to work for. That alone will help you through the process. Maybe learn a new skill that you find is important for the job you are seeking.

MONIQUE recommends the following next steps:

Write down unique attributes about yourself and how you can use that to differentiate yourself from others

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Marcela’s Answer

There are a few key things that you need to remember when going in for an interview.

1. Know what you are interviewing for, do the research. Take some time to look up the company you are about to interview for. What are they known for, what are some of the projects they currently have on the works, or even have they recently been on the news? Additionally, if you have the advantage of knowing who exactly is interviewing you, again do some research on who they are and what their position is.

2. Know your resume. Be prepare to talk about anything you mentioned on your resume and try to keep your resume to 1 page. Always bring printed copies.

3. Dress the part. When in doubt it is always better to dress more formally. First impressions matter.

4. Be up to date with current events. Your interviewer wants to know that you are an informed citizen. There are many websites that provide brief news on what is happening around the world (Ex: skimm).

5. Let the interviewer guide the conversation. Be engaging and interested in what he or she is saying and smile.

6. Finally BREATHE. Remember they are interviewing you because they liked what they saw on your application. Relax and be you and own who your are.

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Lisa’s Answer

I've interviewed hundreds of candidates during my career, and these are top traits I look for when selecting a candidate.

1. Dress up for the occasion, even if the place you will be working has a casual dress code. That doesn't mean wearing a power suit, but make an effort to show you are professional and that this is important to you.

2. Focus your answers on what you will be bringing in as a candidate, rather than on why you are applying for the job. If you are applying so you can learn and grow or to earn more money, that is truly fantastic, but it doesn't help to sell YOU as the most desirable candidate. You can include what you'll get out of the job too, but it shouldn't be the focus.

3. Think up 10 questions you think you could be asked, and practice answering them. These should include some personal examples. It is one thing to tell me you are a 'self-starter', but using an example to describe how you've been a self-starter shows me you aren't just using a buzzword. Read up on the Star Method for interview questions.

4. If you use 'like' or 'um' frequently in your speech, try to eliminate them.

5. Lean forward in your chair, to show interest and engagement. Smile, and make eye contact as best as you can. You're awesome, and want the interviewers to see that.

6. Be very careful about any questions you may ask during the interview; this can be the kiss of death. Questions generally shouldn't be self-serving (how much will I make, what would be my schedule). Ask these when applying for the interview or when scheduling the interview if you must know them ahead of time. Questions also shouldn't be to ask what the job you'd be doing entails as this indicates you don't understand the role (for example, "What would I be doing as a Communication Specialist?"). Questions about something specific can be great (direction, strategy, etc) . It's also ok to say "I feel I understand the role very well and have no additional questions at this time".

7. Lastly, get pumped up before you go into an interview. Listen to an inspirational song, think positive thoughts, and be confident. You are awesome!

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Jennifer’s Answer

Hi Angelina!

Hope you are doing well. Way to go on taking that first step to reach out to others for help & guidance, it's a tough thing to do for some. This is a great question and there are many ways to provide a response with different avenues to take.

With that, here are a few of my thoughts/suggestions/opinions...
+ Be authentic, Be confident, Be caring, Be positive, Be responsive, Be attentive, Be impressive.... and it's okay to Be nervous. :)
+ Do your research on the company & the position you are interviewing for.
+ Have a few questions ready for them to help you get comfortable with the position:
- where will you work?
- who will you work with?
- what additional skills do you need?
- is there training available if you need to better your skills?
- what is the day to day dress code?
+ Dress professional, first impressions do matter! Ask someone if your outfit would be acceptable for an interview and explain to them what the interview is for.
+ Be ready to sell yourself...by means of your skills, your willingness to work, your enthusiasm to join the company - they will ask questions from the application you completed or the resume you provided - be ready to respond.
+ Keep the chit chat to a minimum, do not dominate the conversation. As they speak, you listen and do not interrupt.
+ When speaking, be clear & to the point, keep it simple unless asked to elaborate, slow down & pause when need if you feel like you have been talking a lot (giving a long answer to the question).
+ Smile & stay positive throughout the entire interview - show them you are ready to start working at their company.

I will stop here, hope the above helps! Thank you for giving me the opportunity to share guidance.

Best of luck! You will do great! Stay Strong!

Jennifer B.


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Michelle’s Answer

There really isn't a scripted guide to interviews. I warn people first of all that a positive interview does not guarantee that you will be hired. On the other hand, a negative interview can prevent you from getting that job. Therefore if you want to stay in the running for a position, prepare for the interview.

Preparation takes many forms. First of all, learn all about the company and the industry. This will make the interview into a discussion rather than question and answer session which in turn lowers stress. Make a list of relevant subjects that you could discuss and use as examples. Be sure to dress nicely for the interview; personal grooming is important and shows that you care about yourself and are really serious about the interview/opportunity. Lastly, practice, practice, practice. Employ your friends and family and have them interview you. Answer the questions with eye contact and maybe even while looking in a mirror. This will let you also see your facial expressions and mannerisms. The more you practice, the more at ease you will be and the better your interview will be.

Good luck!

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Jason’s Answer

Some ways of making yourself stand out include confidence in yourself and your abilities in the relevant field you're applying for, as well as being prepared. Asking relevant questions about the company you're interviewing for shows that you're someone who does more than just show up and do the job. Don't be afraid to sell yourself, provide examples of projects you've led and how you have been successful in the past; give details of when you've made a difference at a previous employer.

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Azra’s Answer

Being yourself and being confident is the best way to set a good impression! I made personalized business cards and exchanged that at the end of my interview. Always good to send a follow up email within 24 hours saying thank you and add a personal touch (something unique about your conversation) that way they remember you.

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Addison’s Answer

Luckily, there are SO many ways that you can stand out during a job interview. I recommend starting by following up with your request for an interview if there is any lag time between you and the hiring manager during your initial communication. This shows that you really want the job and that you are also proactive. After you have secured the interview, make sure you dress the part. When in doubt, dress up. I always think it's better to be over-dressed than under dressed. Next, go in with a firm handshake when greeting your interviewer. Further to this, be direct, honest, and most importantly, show your knowledge and generally, don't be afraid to "toot your own horn." Obviously, don't go overboard, but definitely reinforce your knowledge on your subject matter and job qualifications. Be confident!


Confidence is the key for any interview . Debasmita Biswas

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Parth’s Answer

In my opinion, the following approach helps you stand out in an interview. I am assuming that you are fully prepared with respect to your Resume and Technical questions.
1. Dress for success - You should be dressed very professionally. Follow business formals, if not, atleast business casuals.
2. Thoroughly prepare for behavioural questions - Lot of times these questions are ignored since we focus more on technical questions, however, you should be self aware of your strenghths and weaknesses before going into an interview. Interviewers want someone with whom they could work well.
3. Spend some time studying about the company - History, Business Model, Market Capitalization, Stock Price, Leadership etc. Talk to a person in the company and try to get insights on work culture, assessment system, etc. The interviewers like it when you study about not only the position you are applying to but also about the company.

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Lory’s Answer

Hi ! Well, it's really a little of everything: what you say, what you do, and how you present yourself. Read up about the company you are applying for, and seem knowledgeable and authentically interested in the company's values, products, services, etc. Prepare and ask relevant questions. Be clear of your own strengths, and growth areas. be honest about what your growth areas are - and clearly outline how you mitigate for these, or are working on them. Consider taking a course or reading about how to have effective conversations, or interview skills. Good luck !

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Ben’s Answer

I've changed jobs (intentionally) several times over the past 15 years since graduating law school, and I've worked with a career coach. IMO, the first thing you need to consider is which kind of interview are you having. These could range from "speed dating" type on-campus interviews with companies (or in my case, law firms), who may be interviewing upwards of a dozen people in one day, to telephone screening interviews with a company's recruiter, to an initial round of interviews, to a call back (and perhaps final) interview. Each one serves a different purpose, and, therefore, I recommend an approach tailored to the type of interview. This is a spin on "know your audience".

I am not going to cover "informational interviews" in this response. That is, I'm going to assume that you've already decided on the industry in which you're interviewing, you've decided that you'd like to work at this company (more on that later), and that you'd be happy in the role for which you are interviewing (more on this later, too).

If you find yourself in a "speed dating" type of on-campus interview where the companies come to you, set up shop for the day and have either predetermined that they want to interview you or, based on your school's system, have been told to interview you because you got a lottery spot with them, the first things to remember is that the person interviewing you (a) might not want to be there, (b) has probably not read your resume or cover letter, (c) has to go through about a dozen more interviews like yours, or may have already slogged through a bunch of interviews like yours - depending on the time of day, and (d) either has no clue what they are looking for, or has been told to find candidates that they think would be smart and would fit the company's culture. These people are not the decision makers. The sole purpose of this interview is to get a call from the company's recruiter (or, if the company skips that step, to get a call back for a "real" interview). Therefore, the best thing you can do in this type of interview is try to build a personal rapport with the interviewer.

This could come about in a few different ways. You might get lucky, and the person interviewing you might notice a common interest on your resume (please tell me you have an "Additional Information" section on your resume where you list interests, hobbies, languages, etc.!). For example, at the beginning of my career, I used to list dog training as an interest. That's because I had a dog, and I took him to training classes. This was a great conversation starter because there are many dog lovers out there, and the interviewer's interest might be piqued by an unusual reference on a resume - I mean, how many people put "dog training" into their resume that's going out to law firms or companies looking to hire lawyers!? If you're into sailing, put something about sailing. If you are a foodie, put something about cuisine or the Food Network, or cooking. If you're into competitive swimming, put that down. Etc. But, what do you do when the interviewer notices your "interest" that they find intriguing? You need a story. A connection to why that is relevant to the job. I used to talk about how dog training was more about training the person and not the dog. The dog will do whatever you tell it to do, as long as you're consistent and do things the same way every time. So, this became a discussion about self-discipline, self-reflection, acceptance of self-criticism, persistence, try and try again, etc.

If you're not that lucky, the interviewer might open up with: "Why do you want to work here?" Or, "Why did you choose this industry". Some open ended question like that. This is a trap for the unwary, and you are likely to bore the interviewer to sleep if you carry on about what led you to that room. They won't connect. My recommendation would be to turn that question around. For example: "I like this company because not only is it a top tier tech firm, and I'm a total techie, but its culture sounds amazing. I'm curious, how did you get to where you are today?" This approach engages the interviewer and gives them a chance to talk about themselves, which has the dual benefit of giving you insight into someone else's career journey (always helpful information!) and making them feel like they can open up to you, trust you, like you. If they like you, they'll remember you. If they remember you, your chances of the call back go up.

Now, a moment about the screening interview. Some companies have their HR department or an outside agency whittle down the stack of resumes they get before they are even presented to the real decision maker. Always assume that 100 or more people applied for the position you're seeking, and you need to keep yourself at the top of the pile. The real decision makers don't have time to sift through hundreds of resumes, which is why they rely on HR recruiters to shorten the list for them. Recruiters probably have a general sense of what the job is about, but they usually don't know much about the day-to-day of what someone in that role does or what the company really needs. When I was interviewing, this was all done by phone. Today, it might be done by Skype or FaceTime or something like that. Either way, when you're on this call/video, make sure you're in a quiet, private place where you won't be interrupted. A place with bad wifi or bad cell signal - not a good idea. Middle of a cafe - not a good idea. At home with noisy siblings or parents or pets - not a good idea. Find your nook, and be comfortable there. Make sure to have a copy of whatever materials you already submitted - application, cover letter, resume, etc. - because this person could ask you something random off those documents and you don't want to be caught off guard. If you're on video, make sure you dress the part. This doesn't mean fancy clothes, unless you know the place expects "business attire" every day. It also doesn't mean pajamas just because they have a "casual" reputation. A nice looking top somewhere in the "business casual" range would be a safe bet either way.

The recruiter is likely looking for 3 basic things: (a) can this candidate back up what their papers say, (b) does this candidate come close to fitting the bill of what the decision maker is looking for, and (c) is this person's salary expectations in line with what the company is offering. Get a "no" in any of those 3 and you're unlikely to get to the next phase. The other thing to remember is these calls typically last only 1/2 hour, and you don't want to go over. Building rapport with this person isn't necessary (although you don't want them to hate you!). So, how do you back up what your papers say without taking too much time? Know what's in there. Have a snippet ready about each experience or item listed on your resume/application/cover letter, and be ready to spin it in two or three sentences into why it is relevant to the job you're applying for. Been a barista at Starbucks? Handled the cash register at McDonald's? These are great segue points for anything that would require "people skills" or "interactions with others" or "fast paced environment". How do you prepare for getting the recruiter to think that you're the right fit for the job? Know the job description backwards and forwards. Companies are usually pretty clear about the level of experience they are looking for, what the must have skills/background are, and what the nice to have requirements are. Remember, the recruiter doesn't know much about the actual job; but, they know the job description. In fact, they probably helped write the thing! Using what you've prepared about your own background, spin those things into items in the job description. If they are looking for someone at "entry level", be sure to drop in there that you're a recent high-school or college grad, eager to get your career going from the ground up in this field. If they are looking for someone with 5 years' experience, be sure to drop in there that you've got that amount of experience doing XYZ that is related to the job/field (only if it is true!). So, if you're interviewing for a job in communications, there is probably something in the job description about good communication or verbal skills. Remember that summer you spent working the register at McDonald's? There's your communication skills. Are they looking for a self-starter? Tell them about something you did in one of your past jobs or at school or at home that exemplifies self-motivation and independence. You could joke about a lemonade stand you ran when you were 8 years old, and then move into a snippet about having led a student council committee, or working a research assistant position at college. You're looking for little things that line up to the soundbites in the job description. Finally, the salary discussion. If we're talking about a salaried position, very few recruiters are going to just say, we're offering $X, is that OK with you? Their job is to prevent the decision maker from wasting their time. You could be the best candidate, but if you want twice as much as what they are offering, they want to know that before they even bring you in the door - not after they've wasted weeks of time on you and extended and offer only to have it turned down because the salary is too low. So, how do you do this dance? Well, if asked what you're looking for, you could respond with your own question: "How much is the company offering?" You might get a range in response, in which case you should be honest with yourself and the recruiter and let them know if they are in your range. If not, it's best for both if you move on with life. You could also have a preset range of your own based on industry/job/level research. Aim a little high so you don't end up low balling yourself; but, don't go so high that you're out of reach. For example, if your research tells you that entry level positions at this company (or this type of company) are around $35,000/year (assuming you're applying for entry level position), you might say that you're looking for high 30s to mid 40s. That way, you're close enough to the likely salary to be offered that you won't get kicked, but you've left yourself room to push them for an extra couple of grand once you've got them hooked on you!

Which brings us to the next type of interview - the initial or call back interview. This interview is unlikely to be with the actual decision maker, but someone (or several people) with influence over the decision makers choice. These folks are likely to be people who report to the decision maker, who work with the decision maker but in a different department, or who might even be the boss of the decision maker (yes, I had that once!). If you're dealing with someone who reports to the decision maker, these people are likely to be either senior to the position you're interviewing for, or at least peers who have been there longer than you. In any case, these folks know the day-to-day of the job, know the team/department dynamics, and will be looking for 2 things: (1) do you have what it takes to carry your weight and do a good job, and (2) would they enjoy spending the better part of their waking day with you. Because they are interested in your substantive knowledge and skills, they are likely to have taken a peek at your resume. But, they are busy people, so they haven't studied it. They might pick one or two things to ask you about. But, my experience tells me (having been on both sides of the table) that they are going to be looking for what's not there or anomalies. For example, if you worked in the field for a couple of years, and then your resume has a gap of 8 years before your next gig, they will probably ask you what was going on during that time. The best course is to tell the truth - to a degree. If you had a psychological breakdown and were getting back on your feet for 8 years, don't tell them that. But, you might say you had some personal health issues that lasted for years, things are better now, and you're stoked to get back in the workforce. If you had a child and took time off to be a full time parent - say so! There is no shame in being a full time parent, and it as much of a job as "working", so use that to your advantage and tell them about all the skills you learned while parenting - juggling multiple things at once, dealing with administrators at school, conflict resolution, tidiness, organization...whatever is relevant. If you decided to stop working for 8 years to explore the great outdoors, might as well tell them. At least they won't be left wondering whether you were making money as part of a robbery crew for 8 years. Another type of anomaly they might pick up on is a change in career gears, or a difference between your degree and your career choice. For example, I left a big law firm to go in-house. The in-house place wanted to know why I was coming to them, or more to the point, why I was leaving the big law firm. The easy answer was that big law firm life wasn't for me, the hours were too long, the appreciation wasn't there, had to jump when the client said jump, etc. The thing is, if you go down a negative path, you're going down a negative path in your interview, which means the interviewer is not going to leave with a positive feeling about you. But, more importantly, why you left isn't actually important. Why you're going to them is important. So, always have a positive story to tell about why you're going (or went) where you're going (or went), as opposed to why you're leaving (or left) the place you were at. That way, not only does the interviewer leave with a positive feeling about you, but they also hear why you want to work at their company, which is a much better takeaway. When I went in-house, I was coached to tell them why I wanted to be an in-house attorney as opposed to why I didn't want to be at the big firm anymore. And it worked! In fact, I came to learn that most of that legal team had all come from outside law firms (and I think this is generally true in the field), and they all didn't like firm life either. So, I wouldn't have been telling them anything special about myself if I had just said, "yeah, I'm another guy who hates law firm life...can I have a job please?" The much better answer to help me stand out was, "I want to go in-house because I want to be closer to business and my clients. I want to make things happen in the business world. To do that I need to be part of a dynamic organization like yours."

If you have multiple interviewers asking the same thing, give them the same answer, even if it bores you to repeat yourself. Remember, it will be the first time that person has heard what you're saying. And, you want them to all hear the same thing because afterward they are likely to get in a room and discuss you. If it comes up that you gave completely different answers to similar questions from different interviewers, your credibility will be shot. Bye bye offer. And, beyond being prepared to address changes in your path with a positive story about yourself, be prepared for this kind of question: What are some of your strengths and weaknesses? Most people will think you have to answer that question with soft skills like: I'm a good listener, I'm organized, and I'm very friendly; and I get tired in the afternoon, I sometimes make mistakes (but don't worry I learn from them), and I've been told to work on being more assertive. Not only are these answers completely unhelpful - I mean, who really cares if you're organized, as long as you know where everything is and get the job done, and more importantly, why should they believe you just because you say you're organized?! - but, it also leaves you vulnerable to have to reveal the "ghosts in your closet" on the negative side of things. And, to avoid revealing your ghosts, you'll likely try to put a positive spin on the negatives, which makes you sound somewhat disingenuous. The real trick here is to answer that question with "hard skills"! Where is it written that you have to answer with "soft skills"? This helps avoid the fear of your ghosts coming out, and also has the super benefit of telling the interviewer something real about you that is hopefully relevant to the job. So, using me as an example when I was earlier in my career, strengths: I love contracts, in fact I'm kind of a contracts geek and took a special seminar on contract damages in law school; I've worked with all levels of seniority in past jobs, which taught me how to appropriately address the needs of a manager which are different than the needs of a senior exec; and I presented to the board of directors on 3 occasions in a past job. Negatives: I haven't done much with real estate, and I know that's something you're looking for in this role and I'm eager to learn, plus I can put some of my contract skills to work; I haven't done much public company work, and that's something I hope to grow into over time; and I haven't yet been the legal lead supporting my own book of business, but that's what I love about the opportunity of this position.

Three final tips about the initial round interviews before I get to the decision maker interview. (1) try to find out something about the decision maker before you get to that interview. The people who report to the decision maker can be great sources of intel. Ask them what the boss is like to work for. Ask if they have any pet peeves. Ask if there is any particular area they think you should focus on. I once had an interviewer tell me that the boss didn't like long winded answers. This guy told me that if the boss asks me a question in the interview, give a concise answer and then wait a beat or two. If the boss says nothing, then keep talking a bit more and give a little more detail. But, the boss might just as easily move on to another topic. This worked like a charm. Helped the boss feel like I knew what made him tick, didn't bore him with stuff he didn't have any interest in hearing, and helped convince him that I was the right person for the job. (2) (assuming we're post pandemic and you can once again shake someone's hand without the fear of catching or spreading Caronavirus), end the interview with a firm handshake, a brief thanks for their time, and, most importantly, invite the interviewer to follow up with you if they want to ask you anything further or if they come across any questions about your qualifications because you'd love an opportunity to address them. This technique has several great effects. First, it exudes confidence. Second, they are going to discuss your candidacy anyway and might really have some questions or concerns about your qualifications. It's much better to have opened the door for them to email or call you to ask about the shortcomings rather than have them make up something in their heads, which is probably going to be far worse than the reality. Third, it subconsciously opens the door for continued dialogue with you. It says, this isn't over - at least not for me, and I hope not for you, too. (3) Send a short but sweet thank you note. No long letters. No paragraphs or follow up essays. Don't waste their time, but show that you appreciate them. Maybe pick up on something from the interview and say, "I really enjoyed our conversation about XYZ." And, if you have nothing in particular, it's fine to say, "Thanks so much for your time the other day. I really enjoyed chatting with you, and I remain eager to become the next member of your team." Some people like to do these as hand written note cards. I prefer email. But stay away from texts or messaging on social media for this note, IMO.

Now, let's assume you made it all the way to the decision maker. This person has likely heard from all the other interviewers already, has formed some sort of preconceived notion about you based on what those people have told them, and is most likely checking to see if you have not only the "stuff" it takes to fill their short term needs (remember - they are hiring, so there is a job they need to be done and nobody is doing it right now), but also that you have the potential to fit in with the team and represent a good long term investment for them. It isn't cheap or easy to onboard somebody, and most hiring managers want to know that you're going to stick around so they don't have to go through this whole process again in 6 months, train up someone new, and start from square one again. They also want to know that you have the potential to stick around for a while and excel in your career. Good for them, good for you. If you don't progress in your career, you're going to stagnate. Usually that means the company just has to pay you more to do the same thing you've been doing. Companies tend not to like that. They tend to like to see you climb the corporate ladder. Move up as you gain experience, make room for the next entry level person. So, the focus of the interview with the decision maker becomes less about your skill set, which the hiring manager is probably relying on their reports to assess, and more about you creating a vision in the head of the decision maker that you will be the answer to their prayers. You're the unicorn that showed up out of nowhere who is capable of alleviating the headache that this person has had ever since the job opened up. You're also the person that won't abandon the boss in a few months. (Of course, nobody can predict the future, and if you hate it, you don't stay, but that's not what you talk about at the interview!) So, how do you convince the boss that you're the answer to their prayers, can hack it, and will stick around for the long haul? Use the job description (and your earlier interviews) to decipher what this organization really needs you to do. Is it standing at the photocopier for days on end scanning documents? Is it leading a cross-department team of people through a 2 year multi-million dollar software implementation? Is it handling vendor contracts? Is it selling mortgage loans? Is it managing a call center full of people who make a lot of mistakes and make the company look bad? Whatever it is, figure it out, and talk about how you're excited about that challenge and maybe an idea or two of how you'd approach the situation. Standing at a copier scanning documents can be very tedious and tiring and may seem trivial, but those scans could be crucial to something bigger that you don't even know about and if you miss a page, bad things could happen. In that case, you make it your business to tell the boss how you don't mind repetitive work, you have the stamina to stay on your feet for eight hours, you're meticulous about making sure you don't miss any pages, etc. If you're the manager who's going to take on a problematic call center and turn it around. What are some of your strategies that you'd like to try? What tools might you ask if the company has for tracking and monitoring? What kind of training would you ensure people have? How would you figure out what is the root cause of the problem? Maybe it is lack of education. Maybe it is the company isn't paying enough. Maybe it is that the systems are antiquated, hard to use, and don't give even the brightest call center representatives the information they need to be great stewards for the company. And, as for the long term stuff. That, to me, is a personal brand thing. Meaning, even if your resume (like mine) shows that you changed jobs a lot, tell them why you think this job is going to be the last stop on your train. Whether it is settling down in the area, the company's reputation for people sticking around for 30 years, the long term incentives offered by the company, the growth potential you see for yourself there, etc. etc. find a way to let the decision maker know that it isn't your intention to leave anytime soon. The more you can have them believe this, the better off you'll be at getting the offer. Like I said before, most employment is "at will", which means you can leave any time for no reason and the company can let you go at any time for no reason. Deep down the boss knows there is no guarantee that you'll be there two days, much less two months, or two years. But, you want to leave them with the perception that you'll be the one who is going to stick around.

And, the thank you note thing - that applies to the decision maker, too. :)

One parting thought, which actually comes at the beginning of all this - how do you get your resume at the top of the heap to begin with? Most companies tell you to submit your resume and cover letter through their career portal online. You're going to do that. And so are 500 other people. But, you're going to be one of the very few, if not the only person, who also puts your cover letter and resume on paper in the regular US snail mail addressed to the decision maker. It might take some doing to find out that person's name and work address. But, all the sleuthing will be worth it if you can figure it out. Why? Because it is hard to ignore real mail that comes to your desk - no email here! And, assuming you've written a phenomenal cover letter and resume (a whole separate topic), the hiring manager is going to see your papers, is going to be impressed, and is going to want to make sure you get to their desk so they can see for themselves that you are as great as you know you are. That means the decision maker is going to contact the recruiter and tell that person to make sure you get put in the "yes" pile for an interview. You'll still have to go through all the earlier rounds of interviews I talked about. But, this tiny step, is very likely to increase your odds of rising to the top of the hundreds of other applicants and at least make it through the recruiter interview, if not all the other interviews as well.

This is tough stuff, and it isn't always fun. But, you can do it!

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Charles’s Answer

Looking into your work history, jot down 15 major accomplishments. Commit these areas to your memory. You will be able to fit in each of these when interview questions send you to your memory of these accomplishments. Fit them into your answers and expand your reply with creative additions. Throughout the interview, use action words and describe your abilities in terms of the actions you are capable of. Be strong with your confidence in what you can accomplish.

Be sure to write up 3 detailed questions that makes you ready when they ask you what your questions are. Be sure to do your homework and be able to talk about the company that you want to work for. If you have a portfolio of your work areas, bring it with and refer to it with an exciting presentation of your working accomplishments.

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Dennis’s Answer

That's a good question, and one that I've often asked myself. Dress nicely for the interview just one step above what you expect to wear to the job . Best to keep it on the conservative side. Keep your resume 1 to 2 pages max, don't forget your goals and accomplishments along with your job history and education. Have it prepared professionally if you can. Let the interviewer guide the conversation. Be interested in what the interviewer says and don't worry if you can't answer everything. Stay positive, friendly, and interested. Don't worry if you don't get the job, just keep interviewing until you do. Best of luck to you.

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John’s Answer

I would research the company prior to your interview. If you know someone that is employed there or deals with the company as a customer or is a vendor, ask them for some insights into the culture, leadership and direction of the business. Definitely bring up those topics during the interview and have a list of questions prepared to make sure the position / company is also a good fit for you. Good luck.

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Cathy’s Answer

I've conducted a lot of interviews, mostly for leadership positions. The one major thing I look for in a perspective employee, is confidence. The first thing I look at is body language - one should be sitting upright (no slouching) and lean in to show interest of what is being said. Perception is reality meaning if you don't look engaged/interested, I'm assuming you aren't engaged/interested in the position. I am always looking for what the candidate has previously done him/herself - not a 'we' response. What initiatives they have taken on, issues he/she had and how they individually resolved those issues.

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Stephen’s Answer

It is going to be a combination of your skills and positive body language that make you stand out.
There will always be a smarter person but not everyone can match your energy

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Muhammad’s Answer

A few key things which will stand you out during your interview are: 1- Your dress up, 2- Your confidence, 3-A good smile on your face. These are the things which will stand you out before you start your interview. During interview, apart from your technical knowledge, your knowledge/research about the company you are interviewing for will give you an edge. After the interview, always give a warm hand shake, show gratitude and thank the interviewer for the time (even if the interview was not good). Remember, its not only the technical knowledge which will make you win the interview, its a positive attitude which makes the path. And yes.... Not to be Over Confident at any time.


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Anthony’s Answer

Many good answers here. I have conducted a handful of interviews myself and I will chime in to emphasize CHARISMA. Be charming, friendly, sincere, confident, and present. The fact is you will be interviewed by a person and people have an unconscious bias to those they like the most. This added with some of the other answers here, you will be unstoppable.

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Nqabutho’s Answer

  • confidence
  • authenticity
  • being knowledgeable in the job that you are applying for
  • practical proven examples of your achievements, rather than a mere list

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Harpreet’s Answer

Hey Angelina,

I'll keep this short as you've got tons of great advice! When I've interviewed job applicants, the single most important thing that sets candidates apart is being able to demonstrate a genuine interest in the role at the company. Sometimes 'genuine interest' will be called passion, excitement, showing interest etc.

And to demonstrate genuine interest, you need to want the job you're going for and do lots of practice with friends/family (and ask them for feedback on this point).

Good luck!

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Elizabeth’s Answer

Among all the important recommendations above, remember to be yourself and let them know what makes you unique.

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Candace’s Answer

Dress the part.  Be prepared - do your research on the company and/or person that you are interviewing with.  Know the key words and ideas within the area you are applying.  When in the interview, lean in, make eye contact, speak clearly, by honest.  When done, make sure to thank your interviewer by their name and end with a firm handshake.


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Sadaf’s Answer

It is really important to have well-developed interpersonal skills and you should be able to present yourself very well.

Just becareful not to be overqualified for a position you are applying for and keep in mind that employers do not expect you to answer all the questions.


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Sneha’s Answer

The most important things:
1) Be confident.
2) Be well prepared to support the experience mentioned in the resume along with some pretty strong real life examples.
3) Prepare well in the skills highlighted in the resume.


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Anoosheh (Anna)’s Answer

Study the company, know what their mission is and what you can bring to the company to help accomplish that mission.

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Dawn’s Answer

The interview is your chance to shine. Your interviewer has already looked over your resume, so they know the basics. When they ask you to talk about your work history, that’s when you can elaborate and give more details about your accomplishments. Highlight the parts of your current job that you excel at and any major achievements you’ve had. If you’re transitioning into a new field, use the time to explain how your current experience ties in to the job you’re interviewing for.


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Ian (Carl)’s Answer

Some quick bullets here:

-Come prepared. Read up on topics about the field and the company.
-Make sure you have a general idea of what the role entails
-Attitude is key. Act like you want the job! Show enthusiasm during the interview.
-Lastly, dress appropriately. Reach out to your contact prior to get details on dress code.

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Michael’s Answer

You have one chance to make a good first impression. As many others have said, research the company, research your interviewer (on the company website or through LinkedIn) and understand what the position you applying for entails. Know what your short and long-term goals are as well as your strengths and weaknesses. Be prepared to ask the interviewer questions. This can provide several benefits, 1) it shifts some of the conversation away from you and back to the interviewer (who typically like to talk about the company), 2) it shows that you are engaged, 3) it tells the interviewer that you spent some time thinking about the opportunity and your place in the company. Maintain eye contact. Convey confidence in your ability but also show that you are human. Show that while you are applying for this job, that you are well rounded, flexible and open to special projects and different opportunities within the organization. Send the interviewer a thank you message.


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Mia Bindesbøl’s Answer

One thing I learned, that really paid off:

Be who you are, and own it.

Only be and say what you stand for. Do not pretend that you can do or something that is not you. This will be transparent in the interview/personal test. Confident appliers will be more trustworthy.

#resume #job-interview

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Jeffrey’s Answer

Do your research on the company and the role, most importantly arrive early enough to fully give yourself time before your interview starts. Be yourself and answer interview questions with examples. Post interview send a thank you email and or hand written note. Always have a positive attitude and you will do amazingly well.

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Audrey’s Answer

A few things that come to mind, 1) Knowing the business. It is always a good thing to know the business you are interviewing for. What is their goal, credo, how long have they been in business, etc. Doing your research shows that you are already invested in the company. 2) Be confidant. When you meet your interviewer shake their hand and make sure you are making eye contact. Confidence goes a long way, just make sure you stay humble as well.

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Jim’s Answer

Remember that it is natural to be nervous when you interview. Try to practice before your interview with a friend or family member. Some schools also offer "mock interviews". The more you practice the easier it will get. Remember to be early, dress appropriately and sit up straight during the interview. Make eye contact throughout the interview. Research the position and the company that your are interviewing for. The more you know about them, the easier it will be to answer questions. Tell the person interviewing you why you want this job and how you can help the company.

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Surendra’s Answer

1. When you talk about your experience then just don't talk about what you did, instead talk about how you made a difference. For example, instead of saying I did software testing, say I simplifies test script template, improved tester efficiency and testing accuracy.
2. Be as specific as you can, and not beat around the bush. Be short and precise in your response.
3. Highlight your achievements in a way to differentiate yourself from other candidates.

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Zaddie’s Answer

- Show confidence when communicating what you do and DO NOT KNOW
- Ask questions that engage the person you are interviewing with on a personal level (be observant and pick up on personal queues)
- Ask the interviewer where do they see them self in 5 years

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Dennis’s Answer

Angelina be yourself through the Interview process and have a game plan of what you want to relay to the potential employer. Answer any questions you can to the best of your abilities - A candid approach throughout can go a long way during the interview and can show your Authenticity.

Good Luck!

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