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What’s the hardest part about studying criminology?

I’m 17, I’m in high school. I want to study criminology but I don’t know if it’s the right path for me. #high-school #criminology


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Sarah’s Answer

Hi Wendy,

This reminded me of SimplyNailogical (a Canadian youtuber) who works as a crime stats analyst during her day job. She has a podcast talking more about her work (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMRafU-sOH4) if you are interested. It seems like she does a lot of research surrounding crime statistics, and then writes reports on her findings. The hardest part about that likely varies person to person, but if you generally like statistics and writing this could be a good fit.

There are also likely a number of other paths to take with a degree in criminology (which I will let the professionals in that field answer!) but that is one path to go down.

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Chantel’s Answer

It honestly depends on what you are most interested in and your affinity for the position. Criminology has a wide range of opportunities anywhere from research assistants and investigators to psychologists, accountants, and forensic scientists. You have to know what part of the field interests you the most. Do you want to determine the root cause of criminal behavior? Do you want to catch criminals? Are you interested in supporting law enforcement by collecting and analyzing DNA or other substances left at a crime scene? Then comes your compatibility with the career itself e.g. you shouldn't become a blood spatter analyst if you have hemophobia (an irrational fear of blood; although treatable in some cases, I think it should be treated prior to investing time into this path. Disclaimer: I am not an expert in psychology or prescribe to know best practices). Don't expect to be able to naturally look at a path and think "this is it". If it happens, it happens, but sometimes interest comes with knowledge. Look into what options there are, what each positions entails, and education requirements. Not everything related to this field will need a 4 year degree or a degree at all. You should also know what level of advancement you are comfortable with and where it caps. After some digging, you may or may not come to the conclusion that it *isn't* for you. Maybe, while it interests you, it's not something you see yourself doing for 5+ years and that's completely fine. There's a lot of people that have changed their majors 4+ times in college and others that worked and started while older than the traditional student. If you're hesitant, it could be that you're hyper focusing on a specific job and don't like certain cons that come with it but, with such a broad range of prospective paths, I'm certain there's a perfect fit for you within the field. So don't stress yourself out or put yourself on a time constraint to figure it out. Learn, know, and own your passion!

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Noemi’s Answer

There is no hard part in Criminology; you just focus as possible. If you have passion to solve a crime, you won’t get distracted by other things, and your focus is on your puzzle to solve. It’s like a game called Chess, you think strategically and you focus on what’s your next best move. I hope this helps. Good luck! Just do your best.

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