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I just started to think about it

I'm a 10th grader in high school and I don't know what I want to do for a job. #job #high-school Some of my interest include working out, playing games, and cooking.

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Subject: Career question for you

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Sandra’s Answer

It's common to not know what career path you'd like to take (even after graduating high school)! I would first self evaluate and ask yourself the following questions:

1. What are your values?
2. What are your interests and passions (inside of school and out)?
3. What are your strengths and weakness?
4. What is your ideal lifestyle?
5. Are you willing to pursue higher education?

Personally, when I'm overwhelmed, I love quizzes to help give me an idea of what direction I want to take. It's not the end-all-be-all solution though and you must keep in mind that quiz results can give you an idea and may not accurately capture who you really are.

I recommend having initial conversations with a career counselor (if there is one in your school) to get an idea of what career path you want to take.


Hope these guidelines help!
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Patricia’s Answer

It is perfectly fine not to know what career you want yet.

As you finish high school and even when you begin your General Education requirements in college pay attention to the classes (or parts of the classes) that engage and interest you. What did you learn or hear about that made you stop and take notice? Follow that thread and be open to learning new things along the way.

There were classes I took that sparked an interest in me and led me to acquiring a new skill or something else just as valuable.

For example:
- I enjoyed theatre so I took drama classes in high school & college. (Note: There were pre law students in my acting classes trying to improve their public speaking skills. )
- History classes were compelling to me if the instructor was a good story teller. If the instructor enjoyed the subject matter of a class then I paid attention and learned more.

Later as a corporate trainer I had no problem speaking in front of my classes. Using story telling techniques I helped them breakdown complex technical material into digestible bites of information that stuck with them and in turn helped perform their duties better.

And while working as a corporate trainer I realized I wanted to change some of the processes and procedures I was training so I went into project work to make a difference in the direction of what my department was doing. From there I would continue to be open to learning new things and building my skillsets led to other opportunities and careers.

Pay attention to classes (or moments in classes) that catch your interest . Explore and research those subjects more. When you do that the path forward forms in front of you.
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Jennifer’s Answer

You still have a long time to figure out what you want to do and what you want to do might change throughout your career. When I was a senior in HS, I was certain I wanted to major in Theater but as I got closer to declaring, I still wasn't sure. Luckily, you will have the option to start as an open option major and have some time to declare. I switched my major twice before making my final decision. Taking elective courses and connecting with resource groups on campus will help you further identify interests. I also leaned on my advisors to explore career options - some of which I wasn't considering initially. New hobbies may also uncover new passions and lead to a career path you are interested in. Keep an open mind and be open to new experiences - you may find inspiration in the most unexpected places.
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Simeon’s Answer

The starting point I usually recommend is going to the department of labor's website and seeing what the fastest growing fields are. That will give you a starting point if you're drawing a blank about what you'd like to do. I'd also recommend looking at YouTube videos where employees discuss their favorite and least favorite parts of their jobs. One of the downsides to a lot of career decision materials is that they don't usually tell you the downsides of different careers, so it might help you narrow down the options you're considering.

If you're interesting in sports and cooking, you might want to look at sports nutrition as a field to look into. There are specialized sports business programs you could look at.
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