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About choosing best career path

At present I am in 3rd year of B.Tech. I know web development fundamentals, three programming languages and passionate to learn full stack development and have a goal to become full stack developer. But getting confused with some thoughts that whether it will be a good career path or not #career-path . And also my friends are good at so many programming languages but I am not strong at any one programming language completely. Even there are so many career options in computer science field I am confusing everyday which one to choose #career-development. Please advise me which career path to choose and how to build skills to get into it in career.

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David’s Answer

Great Question!

It's important to put your skills to work. It's great to "learn a language" or 3! But the way to ensure you truly "know" something, is to build it. Once you do this, you will be able to show your work to a company and build a portfolio to show what you can do.

Focus more on identifying what you want to do. Do you want to build software for a particular industry? Try learning about something, maybe e commerce, or gaming. Then try building something. Then learn if that's something you really want to do for a long time. If it is, get a job as an engineer, or maybe an intern, for a company and start building your career.

don't worry, you can always change your mind and try something else. Having the skills of a software engineer are important and hirable in many companies.

David recommends the following next steps:

Come up with an app that you would find useful, and build it.
Choose an industry you want to learn about and work in.
Get an internship or an entry level job.
Thank you comment icon David is spot on. Programming languages are tools, and tools are only useful if they are used to build something. Think about what kind of things you like to build and try doing it! If you like it, do it more, and if you don't, try building something different. Those are the kind of experiences that people who want to hire you will need to know about, and they'll test you on it before offering you a job. William (Bill) Tsang
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much David Sir for your Valuable answer. I have read it and it is very useful for me Sir. K. V.
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Jeff’s Answer

1. Don't let programming be "something that's expected of you," and instead try to cultivate an excitement for your craft. This can be a big ask, but always make sure to leave room for personal projects that you find exciting or make you proud to be a developer. Often times school and careers can burn this out of people, so stay on top of that and try your best to avoid situations that might hurt your relationship with what you take pride in.

2. Comparing yourself with others is one of those things that's inevitable, but generally a thing you should try to avoid doing. There are way more people involved in tech than just super-smart coders that know a million programming languages. There's also plenty of opportunities for good listeners, creatives, empaths, and I'm sure whatever positive traits you might have. At the end of the day most of your job will be interacting with other humans, not solving puzzles.

3. Unfortunately you won't know what a job is like until you're doing it. Sometimes we have the luxury to go in the direction that feels best to us, and sometimes we just have to accept what is available. As long as you stay grounded, patient, and willing to change, given time you'll converge on what you're meant to do.
Thank you comment icon Ok Sir .Thank you Jeff Demanche Sir. I will not compare with others from now and these were really great advises for me Sir. K. V.
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Rahul’s Answer

Do what you love. Focus on being a full stack developer. Find a job which interests you. Rewards will follow.

DO NOT COMPARE YOURSELF WITH OTHERS. BIG MISTAKE.
Thank you comment icon Ok Sir. I will not compare with others and Thank you Sir for your advise. K. V.
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Dhawal’s Answer

Great question! Multiple people have answered it, but i would advise a bit differently. Try to approach people that have spent 10+ years in the IT industry and ask them what the hot technologies are. Based on their advise and your interest start learning the latest technology. Take courses on edX or other free learning platforms.
Thank you comment icon Thank you Sir for your advice. K. V.
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Samantha’s Answer

When thinking about your career it would be great for you to look for a graduate scheme or a technology apprenticeship so you can spend some time gaining experience across a broad range of skills within a company. Often you will join a company in a certain role and as your career develops you learn other skills and gain experience that will move you in another direction.

Think about your strengths and what you like doing. It seems you are a generalist which is a great place to be, will give you lots of opportunities to move around in a company.

Talk to your tutor to see where they think your skills are. Approach people to help you, the teachers are there to do just that.

Have a look online to see what information is there.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much Mam for your valuable answer. K. V.
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Kelli E.’s Answer

David's advice is excellent. Another thought to consider is what drives you to excel? Does applying your skills to a company that is doing meaningful work make you happy? If so, find out what kind of skills they need and focus on becoming very proficient in those areas. You may be driven by money, or prestige, or innovation, etc. The advice is the same. We are all unique in what drives us so, figure out what ELSE you want in your career (other than skill proficiency) that matters to you so that it can blow the wind in your sails.
Thank you comment icon Thank you Jones Sir. You have added a great point. I will think of it right now Sir. K. V.
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