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What kind of methods do music therapists use in music therapy?

I'm researching music therapy and am curious about how it is used and what sorts of methods music therapists use. #musictherapy #music #therapy #healthcare

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Nicholas’s Answer

#1 is Quality audio equipment. When the listener cannot tell they are not really there, the brain shifts suspension of disbelief.
#2 Custom tailored audio unique to each patient.
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Josilynn’s Answer

Hello!

While I am not a music therapist myself, the clinic where I work has an amazing one that works with children that have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disorders. She utilizes her guitar, several drums, shakers/maracas, rhythm sticks diverse in both color and texture, as well as some handheld squeaking toys that match the content of her songs. The biggest things she looks for while in a session are making a connection/eye contact with the child in addition to just getting them energized and appropriately participate. She also gives them the opportunity to work on social skills when running a group session by allowing the passing of an object around a circle in time with the music. Utilizing the instruments themselves allows the children to work on their gross motor and fine motor skills. Everything is more fun to learn with music! I hope this helps!

Josie

Josilynn recommends the following next steps:

https://nursejournal.org/articles/the-benefits-of-music-therapy-for-autistic-children/
https://autismsciencefoundation.wordpress.com/2013/08/30/music-therapy-may-help-children-with-autism/
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Sanober’s Answer

Hi Hjelle,

The music used by therapists depends on their preference as well was the type of therapy needed for the patient. I found an article that sites 12 songs that can be used with just about any music therapy client, regardless of age, diagnosis, or ability:

“American Pie” – This song is obviously a classic, and I don’t know anyone who doesn’t like singing along to the chorus. It might not be your first pick for a piggybacked children’s goodbye song, but it was mine :)
“Amazing Grace” – It’s most often associated with seniors and hospice patients, though everyone should have a few hymns in their collection.
“Blue Suede Shoes” – My students dig this tune, even though most of them have no clue who Elvis Presley is! Older clients, of course, are familiar with both him and the song.
“Blue Skies” – I use this as a weather song sometimes, or to give everyone a mood lift. It has always been one of my favorite songs.
“Don’t Worry, Be Happy” – This one is great for discussing positive feelings, and I use it often as the basis of a songwriting activity.
“The Lion Sleeps Tonight” – Also known as “In the Jungle” or “Wimoweh”, I adapted it for young children and sing the original version on a regular basis.
“Lean on Me” – It’s all about knowing there are people to support you, and that’s applicable to everyone. Plus, it’s repetitive and easy to sing.
“Ob-La-Di” – Did you know that this song makes an excellent hello song? I rewrote the words a few years ago, and use it all the time.
“Somewhere Over the Rainbow” – I think a lot of people have an emotional connection to this song. It’s interesting to hear what’s “over the rainbow” for clients who are verbal and capable of abstract thinking.
“Take Me Out to the Ballgame” – Baseball is America’s pastime, right? It’s fun to bring out this song every spring and hear about everyone’s favorite teams.
“This Little Light of Mine” – I learned this song for my internship interview and have been singing it ever since. As a movement song, as an inspirational song, and however else I feel like adapting it on a given day.
“You Are My Sunshine” – A traditional song that almost everyone knows. It’s easy to adapt for just about any client and setting.

Source: https://listenlearnmusic.com/12-songs-every-music-therapist-should-know/

Hope this helps :)

Sanober
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