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how to get a job as a marine biologist

I loved the ocean sines I was little. learning about marine life was the most fun of my life . #marine-biology

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John’s Answer

Westin marine biology and oceanography careers involve occupations in academia, biotechnology development, aquarium curating and public policy. In some cases you'll need a master's degree, but you can get into the profession with just a bachelor's degree. Completion of a bachelor's degree program in biology or oceanography can be sufficient for employment as a laboratory technician or other entry-level positions; however, most research scientists pursue an advanced degree. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of most occupations, coursework in chemistry, physics and mathematics can prove beneficial. Additional coursework in business management and marketing can provide a basis for the administrative duties involved with some businesses.

Graduates of marine biology and oceanography degree programs can go into a number of different careers in different fields. They can use their knowledge of the ocean and its life to pursue a wide variety of jobs. Universities, government agencies and conservation groups employ marine scientists to study and promote understanding of marine life or the chemical, physical and geological characteristics of marine environments. Job descriptions vary by industry. For example, oceanographers specializing in aquaculture may study the effects that farming fish, shellfish and seaweed has on the surrounding environment, while marine biologists develop more efficient and environmentally sustainable farming methods. Governments employ oceanographers to study the effect of pollutants on coastal waterways and marine biologists to study the toxicology of the wildlife within those zones. Private firms employ marine scientists to develop new products or processing methods. For example, a marine biologist at a pharmaceutical company may develop new drugs based on the disease-resistant compounds found in marine species. Oil and gas drilling companies retain oceanographers to help locate new reserves or develop more efficient drilling methods.

Since less than one-third of the Earth's surface is made up of land, there is plenty of room for the study of marine biology or oceanography in areas such as research, education, public policy and aquarium administration. Hope this is helpful Westin
Thank you comment icon Thank You Emel. Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds that you plant. John Frick
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Sophia’s Answer

Hi! I think the other responses here are really good. I can add two more additional pieces of advice. I also explored Marine Biology for a time, and I would recommend looking into local environmental/conservation groups for volunteer opportunities. For example, one volunteer opportunity I considered involved doing water quality tests on local fresh and salt waterways. Because the field is so vast, it is easy to find related opportunities or PT work if you broaden your scope. The other piece of advice I can offer is when looking into college, I would recommend searching for colleges with good Marine Bio programs (preferably a large research university) rather than just the "best" overall universities. This is where you can really gain a lot of knowledge and experience that will be invaluable to you. Research universities will have resources and professors doing novel research that you can work under. For example, the school I went to (UCSD) is not the "best" university in all subjects, but it has a great Marine Bio program through Scripps Institution of Oceanography with extensive research opportunities.
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Kareesa’s Answer

Hi Westin,
Yes volunteer! Field work is the number one way of meeting other people in the field. From there you can decide which avenue you want to pursue or if field work is of interest to you at all. There are so many different directions you can take marine biology/wildlife biology. Indoors vs. Outdoors, and private sector (consulting) vs. public sector (meaning state or government work).

Hope this helps!
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Eileen’s Answer

I agree with John's response. Until you are ready for college, read and learn as much as you can in the sciences so you have a good foundation and know what interests you. If you have any aquariums or even fish stores near you, volunteer or get a PT job so you can get exposed to it. Marine Biology is a HUGE field with lots of different facets...saying "I want to be a marine biologist" is like saying "I want to be a doctor". What kind of doctor? Oncologist? Pediatrician? Dentist? Psychologist?

Learn. Ask questions. Build your foundation.
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