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Does grades matter?

I'm wondering this because there is a lot of people who say that grades do matter and some say that grades do not matter. Does grade matter?

#grades

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Thomas your grades don’t define you—but they do still matter in high school, whether you are applying for colleges, or looking for work after graduation, however you should also remember that you don’t need to hold a 4.0 to be successful. Grades can’t show every amazing quality you have, and colleges, scholarship organizations, and employers understand that.

EMPLOREERS
In the case of high school graduates who are entering directly into the job market, prospective employers often consider GPA to get a feel for what kind of worker you'll be. These companies see GPA as a crucial indicator of whether a person is able to perform the duties of the job. However, not all employers treat GPA equally. GPA is more likely to be taken into consideration for larger companies. Smaller companies may be less interested in GPA than their larger counterparts. In addition, other criteria can play a role in hiring decisions, such as internships, volunteer work, previous work history, and even interviewing and job application skills.

COLLEGES
When applying to a college or university, a College Admissions Officer will look over your application to determine if you are the right fit. Assessing your GPA is one of the ways they do that. The larger or more selective the university, the more likely a strong GPA is needed for acceptance. For many schools, grades in college prep courses or AP courses are the number one criteria used by admissions in deciding who’s in and who’s not. Your high school GPA may be more or less of a factor depending on the type of school you are applying to. Large colleges tend to have stricter cut-offs according to numbers, and GPA is often the most important number. Small schools, junior colleges and state universities may have a more holistic approach to selection, so for these types of schools, GPA may not be as important.

Hope this helps Thomas
Thank you comment icon Thank You Thomas. The only person you are destined to become is the person you decide to be. – Ralph Waldo Emerson Doc Frick
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Carolyn’s Answer

Grades matter until you get your 2nd or 3rd job post school. Grades in HS get you into college, which leads to a career choice. Grades in college lead to internship opportunities and grad school possibilities. Then, those grades open doors for your first position. Once you have a few years of experience, your education is far less relevant to your job search.

That being said, there are A TON of careers where a college degree isn't required including technical trades. If you don't want to worry about grades, that may be a better path for you.

The biggest reasons that grades matter is that they are one of the few ways of measuring effort (however imperfectly) prior to having a job post-school. If you have some other way of measuring effort, diligence, and consistency, those will work just as well in other areas.

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Miko’s Answer

Hi Thomas.....Take a look at this article. You may find this very helpful to your question.

https://expertadmissions.com/colleges-evaluate-transcripts/
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Molly’s Answer

Depending on your career goals, grades do matter. Maintaining good grades will get you into college. And if you plan on attending graduate school of any sort it's important to maintain a good GPA. However, it's important to have healthy relationship with maintaining good grades. Always remember that it is okay to fail and your grades are not a reflection of who you are as an individual. I was once told failure is proof that you're trying and there is always a lesson to learn from it.
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Cathy’s Answer

Greetings! I am a 20-year educator who is a native of Bermuda raised by my father who was at one time in his life an electrician, taxi driver, and real estate agent(he believed in working and paying yourself first!), and my mother was a hairstylist. I have several members of my family who didn't go to college who are bonafide millionaires walking(check out the real estate there a shack will cost about 600K-US) Therefore, I know from my personal experience that formal education is indeed a pathway to a career, however, there are so many ways to become "so-called" financially secure in a career working for someone else or whatever a debt causing four-year institution requires for so many. So, I do believe it is indeed a choice just like life's journey always requires.
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