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what should study and what job should i do

im good at everything but not the best at anything.im also interested in everything but not totally into something.im also good with people as well as teach.I do not have stage fear as well so i am very confused in what to take. #general

Thank you comment icon I'm not a professional, and therefore cannot answer this question formally. But from a student perspective, I would say it doesn't matter so much what you're good at, but what do you like the best and how can you do that professionally. Iyana
Thank you comment icon since you have so many different options it can be hard to figure out what you'd like to do, I know I had the same issue but with time and a lot of experimentation in different subjects I eventually figured out what I'm passionate about. I would suggest not worrying about what career to go into yet, because you still have a lot of time to figure out your passions! sophie

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Faez’s Answer

This is the age old question for students on what to study as they head into post-secondary education. Frankly, I don't think it matters if you aren't the best at something as long as you are dedicated to gaining the skills over the course of your career that will help you be successful.

Have you thought about any professions that seem interesting to you? I suggest speaking to the parents of your friends or if you know people who are working, reach out to them and ask them what they do and what they find interesting about it. You can also think of studying something general like Commerce (covers business, marketing, accounting, etc) or Programming (backend, frontend, web development, etc) so that when you graduate, you have gone through different courses in various subjects that might give you an idea of what you want to eventually want to work or specialize in.

It is a tough decision to choose what to study but exploring different professions and then working backwards on identifying the subjects required for them might help. All the best!
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Brenda’s Answer

Dear Meghasai
I'm glad you have raised your concern in such an important moment of your career path. And I follow Joe's advice here! There's nothing more rewarding that work in something you are passionate about, that you are happy to jump out of the bed every morning and going to work for. It will give you motivation and always drive to keep growing and become better, and who knows, becoming a mentor.

Your work now is finding that spark in you, explore before enrolling in a career you're not sure is for you. Look for other experiences and find out what's the day like in a profession you could be interested.

I went (20 years back in time) to study economy, because it was the great dream of my grandpa that someone in our family got graduated as an Economist (he worked all his life in the taxing agency of my country). I went for it, and work 12 years at a bank and then came to Dubai to do my MBA and finally work as a Consultant/Advisor for Banks. I like what I do, I can't deny it, but you know what really is my passion? Cooking! My life would've taken a very different turn if I has studied to become a Chef. I'm not late though, I plan to do it eventually, but now have some burdens/responsibilities to take care before moving in my career path.

You are in the right time, and we can read you and advise you! Don't hesitate in exploring, the journey will be rewarding.
Have a great day!
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Adam’s Answer

I think you definitely want to network with various individuals. Try leveraging folks from different industries and roles. It really depends on what you're looking to get into. Part of it depends on what your skills are or what you have knowledge and expertise is. Its also good to be well rounded and have knowledge about many subjects vs limiting yourself to just one. Each situation and company are a little bit different and some are willing to take a chance on folks that don't necessarily have a degree or knowledge directly related to the role. It's more about being able to sell yourself in interviews and know how to apply the skills you learned like researching, note taking, discovery, etc and how you would use them to be effective in a role. You may end up taking a job and hating it or you may like it but until you get some experience in something you won't really know what's out there and what types of activities you enjoy doing vs not.
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Bridgette’s Answer

There is a simple but beneficial exercise that I would suggest trying and that is making a Wheel of Influence.
A wheel of influence is exactly as it sounds, it has a middle point (you) and then many many spokes coming off that middle point. On each spoke write something you have genuine interest in (examples - animals, food, outdoors, how things are made, etc). Once you've exhausted all of your thoughts onto these spokes see if you can't start grouping them in 'like categories,' if not that's okay keep moving. On each spoke or beside it jot down careers that touch that potential interest and if you don't know start asking folks in your network.
By the end of this very simple exercise you should have several ideas on career paths that were sparked by things that are of genuine interest to you and you'd be surprised how many niche careers live within those different categories. Have fun and be creative with it, it's a great way to start your exploration.

Bridgette recommends the following next steps:

Create a Wheel of Influence
Enlist Your Network
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Joe’s Answer

Try this- Think about if you were spending 10 hours a day doing one of the things you think you might consider. Picture if you would be happily exhausted or would you be drained and worn out at the end of the day. Those things that might wear you out might not be good fits, but the ones that would motivate you all day long may point to some strengths you can pursue.

Sometimes doing something you tolerate but pays decently may turn into something enjoyable. If you have the chance to follow somebody through their work day or do a "run-a-mile" in something you think you might like can shed light on what could work well vs. not.

I did just one run-a-mile career exploration in college, but it revealed specific things that I was thinking about that industry and role that I didn't have right... that the role I was thinking of pursuing paid well, but the people doing what I really liked about that work were the lesser-paid people. It pushed me to evaluate my other skills, and now I am over 20 years in a completely different field that I do find satisfying. We discover more things about ourselves as we continue through life, and sometimes that's one of the best parts of the adventure.
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Nitin’s Answer

Beyond what has already been answered above, I would just add that it is perfectly normal to be lost into such a big decision on what career path to choose.
In my opinion, what ever you decide,
--put out a list of what Is important to you in your career and life, that defines the constraints around your career path.
--Pick up 3 in the order of priority and try each of them for say a month and see what piques your interest.
--Once you find something interesting, go a bit deeper, and seek out advice from folks already in the field. You don't have to experience everything and learn only from your mistakes, you can draw on the experience of others and leverage that info.
--Soon you will find something interesting that you love doing.
And don't worry too much
it is always possible that as you learn more or come across new experiences in life, your priorities and even career paths can change, But cross the bridge when you come to it, no point thinking too much about it at this point.

Nitin recommends the following next steps:

Already mentioned the steps above to follow.
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Jason’s Answer

Hello Meghasai,

There has been some great advice on this subject already but wanted to add my perspective as I see this quite often. We are fortunate to have so many options in front of us in out time. In the not too distant past pretty much everyone simply did what their family or town historically did and there were few alternatives. My own grandfather ran away from home to join the US Navy to get away from a life in agriculture. It is a massive improvement in life to have these options in front of us. Unfortunately though, this vast array of alternatives can cause many to get stuck when trying to figure out what they want to do. My suggestion is to try thinking about this problem another way. Many students get stuck thinking about what they want to do as a career before they have a solid understanding of who they want to be as a person. I have found that determining what type of a person you want to be first can help clarify the other decisions.

There is an old saying that "If you love what you do you wont work a day in your life" and many people will suggest following your passions in your career. While this is not bad advice, its simply not realistic for most people. Our interests and even passions can and often change over time and what was once fascinating and inspiring can become mundane and boring. I have observed that most people do not find lasting fulfillment in their job alone. This is why focusing on who you want to be as a persons is important. By continually developing as a person you can find success and fulfillment in life whether or not you love your job. Consider this - What type of person do you want to be? If you honestly consider this you will likely find people around you that you love and respect and that you want to emulate. It is also likely that you respect these people for more that a title or position. How do these people make you feel? How do they affect the world around them? In what way do they use their influence? Identifying these characteristics and they working to emulate them will put you on the right path in life.

Once you have figured out the larger and more important "what do you want become as a person" question, the question of "what you want to do as a career" will fall into its proper place. And, as I mentioned, there is a good deal of advise on that side already posted.

Best of luck to you in this - Just remember to be the best you
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Derek’s Answer

Lots of good advice on this thread, so I will keep my answer brief. Best advice I got when I asked the same questions years ago - "Learn what you really love to do and find out how to get paid for it. Then you will never work a day in your life". Most of the time you can be good at a lot of things but don't really love to do them. Find out what you actually love to do. You may think it can't be a career, but you will be wrong.

Simple hobbies or passions in your life can become a career. You can be a phenomenal entrepreneur and learn how to turn your hobbies into businesses. If you can talk to anyone, you can make money. Best of luck!
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