Skip to main content
2 answers
3
Asked 515 views

What is it like working on the floor being a RN?

I basically just want to work in the medial field. #registerednurse #hospital

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

3

2 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Bailey’s Answer

I worked as a floor nurse in the intensive care unit for several years. Patients and their family rely on the floor nurse for updates. The doctor is not always consistent with the times that they assess the patient daily. It is also up to the floor nurse to update the doctor on any changes. The nurse will typically have more than one patient to take care of. In the ICU, I would have 2 critical patients per shift. I would implement all medications, assess for changes, monitor airway, monitor bp and heart rate. When an emergency would happen, I would assist the doctor with arterial line insertion, central line insertion, intubation, chest tube insertion, or any other bedside procedure. It is important to keep up on education and learn as much as possible. Certification such as BLS and ACLS is also required.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Corin’s Answer

As I'm sure you are aware, nurses working in many different settings. Medical offices, home health, corporate roles, and hospitals to name a few. Working "on the floor" typically refers to working in a med-surg hospital setting but can refer to any type of direct patient care roles. In my opinion, working the floor is an essential step to growing as a nurse and should be one of the first challenges a new nurse takes on. It is busy, chaotic, emotionally and mentally consuming but also highly rewarding. You will be faced with many different scenarios that will require you to learn what you know, and when to ask for help. You will become an excellent multi-tasker and an ace at prioritization and time management. This is where you will learn how to work as part of team as you will be developing care plans alongside doctors, therapists, and other caretakers. You will also learn how to lead and manage a team as you will be directing most members of the care team since you are the primary patient contact. Some nurses stay in this role for their entire career. It is ever evolving and there is never a dull moment. However, if after a few years you determine another area is a better fit for you that is fine too. Working the floor will give a solid foundation on which to build any nursing career you choose.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much. Da’Mya
0