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What are some Nursing-related jobs LPN's or RN's can go into that aren't directly related to patient care?

I love caring for people but I have a lower stress tolerance than most and think being in a high stress working environment would not be a great choice for me. I however don't want to be bored/not stimulated mentally. #nurse #LPN #LVN #RN #RegisteredNurse #nursing #healthcare #medical

+25 Karma if successful
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Subject: Career question for you

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Victoria Paige’s Answer

Hello dear.
So nursing is a very vast field. There are a lot of specialties and, once you gain experience, a lot of doors can be opened for you depending on what your passions are. You can go into legal nurse consulting where you help lawyers with their cases (something I do). You can teach, both in a classroom setting or hospital. You can write articles, conduct research, perform informatics, so many things. Literally the world is the nurse’s oyster if he or she chooses to chase what they are passionate about. However, to fully know what you like or are expert at you must first gain the experience. This starts with bedside nursing and is required to jump into the other facets of the field. This takes time so you can’t graduate then immediately start teaching or consulting, but after a few years you will find your niche and flourish.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much Victoria I really appreciate you taking the time to comment and I do apologize for getting back to you so late. While I am still unsure exactly what I want to do in the broad field of nursing, I know that there are so many options out there for me once I get some experience as a nurse. I start nursing school relatively soon and am praying for the best. Hope you are staying safe from the new COVID variant and thank you for all that you do :) Katherine
Thank you comment icon Hi i am thank to u for all this kindness Margaret
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HP’s Answer

KB - nursing can be an extremely rewarding career, personally, professionally, and financially. With COVID, nurses are in higher demand. However, as an entry-level frontline healthcare professional, you may be doing a lot of repetitive and not-so-stimulating tasks in a very stressful environment (i.e. life or death environment). Most entry-level nursing jobs involve direct patient care. You can eventually go into Utilization Review, Case Management, and other jobs that do not require direct patient care, but those jobs require experience.

I would recommend that you outreach to clinics, hospitals, medical offices, and healthcare providers in your area to see if you can shadow a nurse to learn more about a day-in-the-life of a LPN/RN to help you make an informed decision. You can also research the nursing profession by interviewing neighbors and friends-of-friends and/or extended family members. You'll get better answers if you ask open-ended questions and if you volunteer personal information about yourself during these interviews. For example, expound on the comment you made about "being in a high-stress working environment would not be a great choice for you" or what do you mean by "bored/not stimulated mentally"? You want work to challenge you mentally, but this is not going be the case all the time.

My wife is a Public Health Nurse and a Case Manager and I have worked in a large hospital setting with clinical and research responsibilities so I know a little bit about the medical profession and nursing. I wish you great success as you embark on the next chapter of your life. May the Force be with you!
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Ashley’s Answer

Hey! One of the many reasons I love nursing is there are so many different paths to take with it. I would look into jobs with insurance companies. Utilization review and case management may be of interest to you.
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Linda’s Answer

Hello! Non-clinical nurse roles include utilization review, medical review, precertification/prior authorization, informatics, healthcare data analytics, clinical documentation integrity, to name a few.
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Sherie’s Answer

Hi Katherine B.,

This is a great question. A friend of mine who has her nurse's license did exactly what you are asking. There are jobs as Medical systems Manager that nurses take on where they are helping with creating online platforms on systems that doctors and nurses who work in hospitals will be using daily. You could be a coder, or work in clinical services- such as social worker but only dealing with the paperwork vs the patients. My friend works in "Informatics"- providing information and training to medical staff on the platforms that they will be using at various hospitals, now that the medical field as moved to a digital world. These opportunities may take time to get into, however once in these roles, they are great jobs and depending on the state you are in , you could make over 6 figures. Best of luck to you.
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Liz’s Answer

Hello, hope you are getting tons of good information here.

This is a great question, and some ideas I can think of are

School Nurse
Appeals Board
Legal Nursing
Management
IT
Pharmaceuticals
Instrument Representative
Education
Healthcare Mentor-Tutor-Advisor

Let me know if you have any further questions, and good luck with everything. :)

Liz Anderson
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Sandra’s Answer

Hello Katherine,
Typically, LPNs provide direct patient care; RNs can venture out into either direct or indirect patient/people contact as they advance their education, which is the most advantageous opportunity that an RN can use as a goal to indirectly provide services; there are so many avenues that RNs can practice that involve indirect patient care such as: nursing instructor, coach, case management, legal nurse consultant, utilization management, leadership, researcher, quality improvement, informatics, patient advocate, risk manager, or nurse educator; however, LPNs are limited to these options due to their degree and licensure levels that still can be advanced to the RN level with an advanced degree. I hoped this information helped you and good luck in your nursing career endeavors.
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Shannon’s Answer

You can have a lower-stress nursing job. however all jobs have some stress here & there. i do recommend that you find a way to learn some coping skills that will help in all areas of life - not just at work but also in relationships & whatever else you do. it's a pain in the neck, yes, but everyone has to learn it. start by reading some self-help books and/or talking to a therapist. it has nothing to do with being crazy. you'd just be learning new life skills & increasing your self-confidence.
a key to having less stress as a nurse is to learn your skills solid. that way when stress does happen you're prepared for anything. Of course nothing is absolute, so do research & ask questions about what's written here to be sure that particular job offers what you want.
so, here are some jobs that have lower stress. (btw all nursing jobs involve a lot of paperwork. learn how to do it quickly & accurately so you can move on to other tasks).
be a nurse at a school (including a college): you'll mostly keep records, call parents to pick up a kid who's suddenly sick, do annual testing (like hearing & scoliosis tests). some schools have students who will need help with feeding tubes & other similar things. you may be called to attend to any emergency that happens, which might be too much stress for you. if you can tolerate that, you'll be able to send your kids to this school for free.
be a nurse in a nursing home: this is not the cleanest of jobs. there can be emergencies. mostly you'd write & follow a treatment plan to keep the patients comfortable & functioning. you'd do treatments & tests, give medications and call the doctor for new plans when things change. if you enjoy people & work with good people, this can be a nice family-like environment where you grow close to the people around you.
be a nurse in a family doctor's office: similar to a nursing home, this can be a nice environment where you participate in peoples' lives & watch families grow. you'd do tests & treatments, give meds & vaccines, supply education & do paperwork.
be a nurse at a specialty doctor's office: if you pick a field like dermatology, cosmetic plastic surgery, ENT, podiatry you won't have many true emergencies in the office (no guarantee, of course). you'll do tests & treatments, keep records, normal office stuff like that.
be a nurse in the employee health office at any kind of employer: similar to working at a school, you'd keep records & attend to employees who are sick. there may be real emergencies. here's a secret: if you work at a hospital, the ER staff may be the first ones called for emergencies. maybe you won't be involved at all unless it happens in your office.
these above jobs are usually conducted during bankers hours, 8-hour days with holidays off. the stress that happens is mostly because patients are anxious for test results, or a doctor wanting everything RIGHT NOW, or co-workers who don't get along. Quite different from an ER job, for example, with widely varying work hours & many patients at risk of dying.
the above jobs also have significant daily face-to-face patient contact. if you want to avoid that, you could be a telemedicine nurse. you'd talk to patients on the phone or video chat. you'll ask the right questions to get the right information to help them. sometimes you can answer their questions, other times you forward their questions on to a doctor. you won't have to be on your feet all day or clean up bodily fluids. If the patient has a heart attack while you're talking, you'll call 911 for them but won't be doing CPR. These jobs will become more & more available as video chat spreads.
be a nurse for an insurance company: very similar to telemedicine, with the addition of interpreting the company's rules. happens in an office but some employers may want you to/let you work at home.
be a nurse for research: similar to a doctor's office, with the addition of following research procedures (which are very strict). happens in an office. low risk of emergencies. lots of paperwork.
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TRICIA’s Answer

If your are looking for a non stressful healthcare professional, I suggest health information management (medical records), healthcare IT, or health informatics. All of these options help support the healthcare industry, without being on the floor dealing patients directly

TRICIA recommends the following next steps:

If you are looking for a healthcare position, but do not necessarily want a high stress position, look into health information management (medical records) or healthcare IT. Next option could be healthcare informatics
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Katherine,

Non-Clinical Nursing Jobs for LPNs and RNs:

Nurse Educator: Nurse educators work in academic settings, teaching aspiring nurses in classrooms and clinical settings. They develop curriculum, provide instruction, and mentor students. This role allows LPNs and RNs to share their knowledge and expertise without direct patient care responsibilities.

Case Manager: Case managers coordinate healthcare services for patients, ensuring they receive appropriate care and resources. LPNs and RNs in this role collaborate with healthcare providers, insurance companies, and patients to create care plans and monitor progress.

Healthcare Consultant: Healthcare consultants provide expertise to healthcare organizations on improving patient care, operational efficiency, and regulatory compliance. LPNs and RNs can leverage their clinical experience to offer insights on best practices, quality improvement initiatives, and workflow optimization.

Medical Writer: Medical writers create content for healthcare publications, websites, educational materials, and pharmaceutical companies. LPNs and RNs with strong communication skills can excel in this role by translating complex medical information into accessible content for various audiences.

Telehealth Nurse: Telehealth nurses provide remote patient monitoring, triage services, and virtual consultations. LPNs and RNs can deliver care through phone or video calls, offering convenience to patients while working in a less stressful environment compared to traditional clinical settings.

Health Informatics Specialist: Health informatics specialists analyze healthcare data to improve patient outcomes, streamline processes, and enhance decision-making. LPNs and RNs interested in technology and data analysis can pursue this role to contribute to the advancement of healthcare systems.

Quality Improvement Coordinator: Quality improvement coordinators assess healthcare practices, identify areas for enhancement, and implement strategies to optimize patient care quality. LPNs and RNs play a crucial role in ensuring adherence to standards and protocols within healthcare organizations.

Medical Sales Representative: Medical sales representatives promote medical devices, pharmaceuticals, or healthcare services to healthcare providers. LPNs and RNs with strong interpersonal skills can thrive in this role by educating professionals on products and building relationships within the industry.

Research Coordinator: Research coordinators support clinical trials and studies by managing participant recruitment, data collection, and regulatory compliance. LPNs and RNs interested in research can contribute to advancing medical knowledge while working in a research-focused environment.

Occupational Health Nurse: Occupational health nurses focus on promoting workplace safety, conducting health assessments, and providing employee education on health-related issues. LPNs and RNs can apply their nursing skills in a corporate setting to ensure the well-being of workers.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

American Nurses Association (ANA): The ANA is a professional organization that sets standards for nursing practice in the United States. Their resources provide valuable insights into various nursing career paths beyond traditional patient care roles.

National League for Nursing (NLN): The NLN is dedicated to excellence in nursing education and offers information on nurse educator roles and opportunities for professional development in academia.

Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS): HIMSS focuses on healthcare technology and informatics, offering insights into non-clinical roles such as health informatics specialists within the healthcare industry.

These sources were consulted to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information provided regarding non-clinical nursing career options for LPNs and RNs.

GOD BLESS!
James.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hi Katherine!

Nursing is a dynamic profession with a multitude of career paths beyond just patient care. Whether you're a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) or a Registered Nurse (RN), there are numerous non-clinical roles that let you apply your nursing knowledge and skills in a less intense setting. Here are some nursing-related jobs that you might find interesting:

1. Nurse Educator: These are the folks who shape the future of nursing. They work in schools, hospitals, and healthcare organizations, creating curriculum, teaching nursing courses, and giving hands-on clinical instruction. They also keep up with the latest nursing trends through research and professional development.

2. Case Manager: Case managers are the link between patients, their families, and healthcare providers. They assess patients' needs, create personalized care plans, arrange necessary medical services, and keep an eye on the progress of treatment. They ensure smooth care, foster good communication among healthcare professionals, and guide patients through the healthcare system.

3. Healthcare Consultant: These professionals offer expert advice to healthcare organizations, government agencies, insurance companies, and others in the healthcare industry. They analyze data, spot areas for improvement, develop strategies to better patient care, and help put new policies or programs into action. They may specialize in areas like quality improvement, risk management, informatics, or healthcare administration.

4. Nurse Researcher: These nurses push the boundaries of nursing science by conducting research aimed at improving patient outcomes and enhancing care quality. They design research protocols, collect and analyze data, publish findings, and work with interdisciplinary teams to apply research to practice. They often work in academic institutions, research organizations, or healthcare settings.

5. Telehealth Nurse: As telemedicine grows, so does the role of telehealth nurses. They use technology to assess patient conditions, give medical advice, and guide patients in managing chronic illnesses or minor injuries. They might work for telemedicine companies, insurance providers, or healthcare organizations offering virtual care.

6. Nurse Informaticist: These nurses are the link between nursing practice and information technology. They use their nursing knowledge to design, implement, and optimize healthcare information systems and electronic health records. They ensure healthcare data is correctly captured, securely stored, and easily accessible for clinical decision-making and research.

7. Legal Nurse Consultant: These nurses help lawyers and legal teams in cases involving medical malpractice, personal injury, or other healthcare-related legal issues. They review medical records, analyze complex medical information, provide expert opinions, and help lawyers understand the medical side of a case. They may also testify as expert witnesses in court.

8. Pharmaceutical Sales Representative: Nurses in this role can effectively communicate with healthcare professionals about pharmaceutical products. They educate doctors, nurses, and other healthcare providers about new medications, treatment options, and medical devices. They often work for pharmaceutical companies or medical device manufacturers.

These are just a few examples of non-clinical nursing roles that LPNs or RNs can pursue to avoid high-stress working environments while still finding the work intellectually rewarding. Keep in mind, the availability of these roles can vary based on factors like location, experience level, and individual qualifications.

Top 3 Authoritative Reference Publications/Domain Names Used:
1. American Nurses Association (ANA) - www.nursingworld.org
2. National League for Nursing (NLN) - www.nln.org
3. American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) - www.aacnnursing.org
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