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Is it difficult for LPN's/LVN's to find jobs after graduating nursing school?

How can new nurses increase their chances of finding a job? Should they start in a particular field? I have not gone to school yet but when I do I will probably go to a LPN to RN program part-time while working. #Nurse #LPN #LVN #Nursing #RN

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Victoria Paige’s Answer

Absolutely not. There are always jobs available. Most students have jobs lined up before they even graduate. With you specifically asking about LPN that may not always be the case, but with RNs they almost always have jobs very quickly after graduation. If possible I would suggest working as a nurse intern or patient care tech while in nursing school. This allows you to not only gain patient experience, which looks great on resumes, but if it’s at a hospital or facility you already have your foot in the door to immediately start working as a nurse upon graduation. I worked in a hospital setting while in nursing school and I had a nursing job secured long before all my other classmates. However, everyone in my class who passed the NCLEX had a job very shortly after graduation.
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Raquel’s Answer

One great thing about becoming a nurse is there are always jobs open. It is important to remember that LPN's need to be under an RN because they cannot perform all nursing duties independently, so there are significantly more job options for a RN than a LPN. But especially right now everywhere is desperate for nurses because all facilities have had a hard time holding onto staff and many people are leaving the profession all together. Most LPNs work in long term care and skilled nursing facilities. RNs most often start in hospitals and most commonly on medical or telemetry floors. Specialties are opening up more to new nurses with the growth of nurse apprenticeship programs that put student nurses in specialized fields while still in school to gain experience and then often are able to get a job at the same facility in the specialty (this includes ICU, pediatrics, Labor and Delivery...). I don't know about LPN programs but RN programs typically don't do part time schooling, nursing programs are not like regular college where you create your own schedule, they have their own set schedule of classes you take and when. That's just something to keep in mind when deciding what path is best for you. Best of luck!
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Sandra’s Answer

With LPNs in such higher demands now, the time of LPN job acquisition should be much less than before; the reason for higher demand is described here: https://www.rasmussen.edu/degrees/nursing/blog/why-lpns-are-in-demand/ and LPN job information is here: https://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/29-2061.00 . I have been an acute RN for 8 years; it took me over a year to find a job at a local hospital that did not have a nurse residency program at the time of my hire, which was implemented about a year after my hire; I had to start at an employment agency to obtain an RN job while waiting feedback on the job hospital application; therefore, it depends upon your experience and where you would like to start as an LPN; hospitals typically take longer to acquire positions as they have different hiring processes than other healthcare settings; many people who acquire hospital jobs quickly usually have someone they know; from my experience of acquiring an RN job more quickly was either starting out at employment agencies or other temporary position contracts.
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