Skip to main content
3 answers
3
Asked 595 views

When going to law school, what is the workload and how can I get accepted after I graduate ?

#lawschool #judge

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

3

3 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mackenzie’s Answer

Law school is known for its rigorous workload, which includes a combination of coursework, readings, legal research, writing, and practical experience. Here's a general overview of the workload you can expect in law school and some tips for getting accepted after you graduate:

**Law School Workload**:

1. **Coursework**: Law school courses cover a wide range of legal subjects, such as constitutional law, contracts, torts, criminal law, civil procedure, property law, and more. Expect to attend lectures, participate in discussions, and complete assignments related to these subjects.

2. **Legal Research and Writing**: Legal research and writing are fundamental skills in law school. You'll conduct research on legal issues, write legal memoranda, briefs, and other legal documents, and refine your writing and analytical skills.

3. **Reading**: Law students read a significant amount of legal texts, cases, statutes, and legal commentary. You'll be expected to read, comprehend, and analyze complex legal materials regularly.

4. **Moot Court and Mock Trial**: Many law schools offer opportunities to participate in moot court and mock trial programs. These activities involve researching legal issues and presenting arguments in simulated court proceedings.

5. **Clinics and Externships**: Law clinics and externship programs provide hands-on experience in legal practice. You may work on real cases under the supervision of experienced attorneys.

6. **Study Groups and Class Discussions**: Collaborative learning is common in law school. Study groups and class discussions allow students to explore legal concepts, share insights, and test their understanding of the material.

7. **Exams and Assessments**: Law school courses often include final exams, midterms, or other assessments to evaluate your understanding of the material. Exam formats may include essays, multiple-choice questions, and performance tests.

8. **Legal Writing Competitions**: Some students participate in legal writing competitions, which involve crafting persuasive legal arguments and briefs on specific issues.

**Getting Accepted After Law School**:

After graduating from law school and passing the bar exam, you'll work on getting accepted into the legal profession. Here are some key steps:

1. **Bar Admission**: Once you pass the bar exam in your chosen jurisdiction, you'll be eligible to apply for admission to the bar. This typically involves submitting an application, undergoing a character and fitness evaluation, and paying licensing fees.

2. **Job Search**: Begin your job search by networking with legal professionals, attending job fairs, and seeking opportunities in law firms, government agencies, public interest organizations, or corporate legal departments.

3. **Professional Development**: Continuously develop your legal skills and knowledge through continuing legal education (CLE) programs and training opportunities.

4. **Building a Reputation**: Establish a reputation for professionalism, ethical conduct, and competence in your chosen field of law.

5. **Mentorship**: Seek guidance and mentorship from experienced attorneys who can provide insights and advice as you navigate your legal career.

6. **Specialization (Optional)**: Consider specializing in a specific area of law, if desired, by pursuing additional training or certifications.

7. **Professional Associations**: Join and actively participate in legal associations and bar associations relevant to your practice area.

8. **Client Development**: If you're in private practice, focus on client development and building a client base. Strong client relationships can lead to professional success.

9. **Publications and Presentations**: Contribute to legal scholarship by writing articles, giving presentations, or participating in legal conferences.

10. **Ethical Conduct**: Adhere to the highest ethical and professional standards in your legal practice.

Getting accepted and building a successful legal career requires dedication, networking, continuous learning, and a commitment to ethical conduct. It may take time to establish yourself in the legal profession, so patience and persistence are essential.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Job’s Answer

The work load in law school is large, with many hours studying the reasoning behind the decisions. Upon graduation, and if working in a law firm as a new attorney you can look forward to 55-70 hour work weeks and so so pay. It takes special/exceptional skills and hard work to advance, but after 5-10 years it will lighten up and become much more profitable.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kali’s Answer

Hi Amyah:

I have experience as a prelaw advisor, but have not been to law school myself, so my answer to the first part of your question is pretty general: law school workloads are pretty intense, more so than an undergraduate workload. I will leave it to someone who has had the experience to get more specific about what being a law student is like.

I can provide more details about how to get accepted after you graduate. Law schools care a lot about GPA, so making sure your grades are strong, but also that you’re taking hard courses that will help you develop writing and critical thinking skills are things they look at closely. Law schools like applicants who are passionate and take action on their passions, so making sure you have experiences outside of the classroom is important. Look for internship opportunities and some clubs/activities/volunteer work where you develop substantive skills and you can work up into a leadership role. These experiences don’t have to be in the legal field (but they can!); they should be tied to your interests though, and it can be helpful to choose experiences that might connect to areas of law you’re interested in practicing.

LSAT (or GRE) scores are important. These are the standardized tests law schools look at. Make sure you plan to dedicate several months to studying and that you take the test when you feel prepared to achieve your best score. Nobody just does well on the LSAT without studying, so make sure you plan to give it your time and energy.

You’ll need at least two letters of recommendation from your faculty. Start building those relationships as soon as possible. Identify faculty who you enjoy learning from and make sure you’re giving them your highest quality work. Go to their office hours and talk to them about your work, their research, your goals for law school, etc. If you can, take multiple classes with them or do research with them. The better they know you, the better equipped they are to write a strong, personalized letter of recommendation, which law schools love to see. Faculty letters carry much more weight than letters from other folks, especially if you’re going to law school within a few years of finishing undergrad.

Finally, you’ll need to write a strong personal statement and other optional statements. Work on your writing in school. Use your college’s writing center or career center to get feedback on your essay when it comes time to write them.

The final main thing to keep in mind is that law schools value people who are detail-oriented and can follow instructions. Make sure you read all instructions carefully and follow the guidelines each program lays out for you.

I hope this is helpful, good luck to you!
0