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What happens in a typical day for a biomedical engineer/researcher?

I am interested in pursuing a career in biomedical engineering, specifically research in regenerative medicine. It seems that most of what I read about biomedical engineering careers is focused more on the mechanical side of the profession rather than the human side. I want to research topics that would help identify disease, cure disease, or offer provide knowledge on how the human body can heal itself. #medicine #biomedical-engineering #medicine-research #biomedical-science

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Arsree’s Answer

I am a final year graduate student. If you want complete research for your study, then you are in the right field. You will have a wide range of research to work on that's actually can contribute a lot in healthcare. According to my experience, if you want your carrer to be completely in research, you need to do PhD. If you are just planning to complete your undergraduate level or Masters, though your studies are completely research based, it will be very difficult to find a job as a biomedical researcher. The job will be more focused on instrumentation, product development, manufacturing, etc.

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Andrea’s Answer

I got my bachelors in biomedical engineering in 2018. As Arsree said, if you want to work in research you will need a PhD. I do have some colleagues that were able to enter R&D with a Masters and very few with a Bachelors degree. Those that were able to join R&D with a bachelors had significant research experience during college, internships/Co-ops, and had good connections from their research labs.
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