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What can I do with a Mathematics Major besides teaching?

I was wondering if I should major in mathematics, but I would not like to become a teacher or professor. #teacher #mathematics #choosing-a-major

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Subject: Career question for you

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Lisa G.’s Answer

You might want to check out the website BeAnActuary (http://beanactuary.org) beanactuary. An actuary is a business professional who evaluates risk, often in an insurance company. You need to be a self starter as an actuary, so you can pass the exams required to get the credentials while you are also working in a business environment. But you don't have to go to school beyond an undergraduate degree to get these credentials.
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Leslie’s Answer

You can do many things with a math major! You can work for a company, be a consultant, go into marketing, go into politics, and do a host of other things. You could even go to graduate school in something totally different, like medicine, law, or business. Really, you could do almost anything with a degree in math. That's the beauty of university education in the U.S. - your degree doesn't tether you to a particular career. Hope that helps!

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Joe’s Answer

An important thing to note is which sort of Mathematics degree you should pursue. There are two main types of math degrees: Applied and Pure. Pure math deals more with theory, whereas applied math is more concerned with using math to solve problems. Considering that you don't want to teach I would advise you to look more into applied math if that's where your interest lies. You can do a lot of things with an applied math degree. Some specific examples to explore include Actuary, data science, consulting, accounting... just to name a few.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Kenny!

Choosing to major in mathematics can pave the way to an array of exciting careers, and not just in teaching or academia. The knack for problem-solving and analytical thinking that you develop as a math major is highly prized in many industries. This makes math graduates hot commodities in sectors like finance, technology, data analysis, and research. Here's a glimpse at some of the career paths you can embark on with a math major:

1. Actuarial Science: Actuaries are the wizards of risk assessment in the insurance and finance sectors. They crunch numbers to help businesses manage risk, set insurance rates, and design pension plans.

2. Data Analysis and Statistics: In our data-driven world, there's a growing need for professionals who can make sense of vast amounts of information. As a math major, you could find yourself working as a data analyst, statistician, or data scientist, using your number-crunching skills to glean insights from data.

3. Financial Analysis: Math majors are a natural fit for the finance world, where they can shine as financial analysts, investment bankers, or risk managers. Your analytical prowess and knack for complex numerical models can be a real asset here.

4. Operations Research: Operations research analysts use math and analytical methods to help organizations tackle tough problems and make smarter decisions. You might find yourself working in logistics, supply chain management, or healthcare operations.

5. Computer Science and Programming: With a solid grounding in logic and algorithms, math majors are well-equipped for careers in computer science and programming. You could work as a software developer, systems analyst, or computer programmer, using your math skills to create efficient algorithms and solve computational challenges.

6. Market Research and Consulting: Math majors can also find rewarding careers in market research or management consulting. Here, you'll use your quantitative skills to analyze market trends, conduct surveys, and offer strategic advice to businesses.

7. Engineering: While engineering usually requires a specific degree, math majors with a strong background in applied mathematics may find opportunities in fields like aerospace, civil, or mechanical engineering.

8. Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Technology: The emergence of cryptocurrency and blockchain technology has opened up new avenues for those with strong math skills. You could explore careers in cryptography, blockchain development, or digital currency analysis.

9. Research and Academia: Even though you're not keen on becoming a professor, it's worth noting that math majors can pursue research roles in various fields like pure mathematics, applied mathematics, physics, or computer science. These roles could be in academic institutions, government agencies, or private research firms.

10. Entrepreneurship: If you're a math major with a business flair, you could start your own company or join a startup that needs strong quantitative analysis and problem-solving skills.

Beyond these specific careers, a math major is a great stepping stone to further studies in fields like economics, engineering, computer science, or applied mathematics.

Here are the top 3 authoritative reference publications for you:

1. American Mathematical Society (AMS) - www.ams.org
2. Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) - www.siam.org
3. Mathematical Association of America (MAA) - www.maa.org

May your journey be filled with blessings!
James.
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Karin’s Answer

Hi Kenny,

Mathematics is valuable in so many fields, but I would recommend to take applied mathematics and something else that makes a good combination for better marketability. What that "something else" is depends on your interests, any science or computer discipline would work well, also finance or business.

As for employment, how about finance, data science, machine learning, accounting, statistics? It seems the majority of all job openings I see are for data scientists and machine learning.

Good luck!

KP
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