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What are some challenges in the becoming a doctor?

Did you ever think about giving up?
why? or why not?
Was the career choice worth it? #medical #medicine #medicine #medical-school

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Nicole’s Answer

From the answers above and from what you may already know, becoming a doctor is hard work. Lots of school, lack of social life for a bit, etc.
I believe an important thing to ask yourself prior is- Do you like people? Do you like helping people? Will you do things you might not always enjoy to help those people?
If helping people, constant learning, and educating patients makes your soul sing, becoming a doctor may just be worthwhile.
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April’s Answer

Academic and Career Advisor for medical students here! First, I want to say that it is great that you are interested in a profession that is serving others. You are literally giving life and that is commendable. To answer your question, becoming a doctor is a huge commitment. Some of the challenges may include difficult science courses, lots of science-based exams, skills-based exams, learning a lot of material in a short span of time, long study hours, long hours on rotations, paying for residency applications, traveling for residency interviews and of course the cost. But as the saying goes, “To whom much is given, much is required.” These things can be obstacles, but you have to remember to take things one step at a time and think about the bigger picture. Think about the impact you can make. From the outside looking in, it seems scary and impossible. For the first two years as a student, it can seem like all you’re doing is studying. But when you get to put those skills to use in your 3rd year and 4th rotations, it clicks! You remember why you wanted to become a doctor. You get to work with patients and become a part of their story. You get to experience all of the major specialties and be in the hospital with doctors guiding you. You get to be around residents (also doctors) who were JUST in your position. You get to receive advice from doctors in your specialty telling you about their experience. Throughout med school, there are also chances for you to explore other opportunities like volunteering, shadowing, research, being mentored and student interest groups to supplement your learning and to provide work-life balance. Wellness is important! There’s also great opportunities after you get your MD, such as fellowships, academic positions at colleges, and speaking engagements. The point is, yes it may be difficult at first, but it can be a very rewarding experience. There is a need for more doctors (we need you!) so don’t be discouraged. There will be support for you every step of the way.
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Rahul’s Answer

Despite being trained in the best institutes, I have been not been able to obtain a gainful position at one leading autonomous organization. I have found the process of recruitment debasing and opaque. I do believe that the same has come about because of my resistance to follow a certain coercive minority ideology/ individuals in power. I have realized that the idea that you are not supposed to fight for what you might believe in and are expected to become part of a dull, soporigic ongoing narrative (without being expected to contribute actively towards changing it) has been most challenging (to me personally, during this time). An ideology egging you down and threatening you to be part of a system (with the threat of expulsion looming over your head) can also be particularly demanding. Medical etiquette being misinterpreted as a set of rules (rather than a matter of personal choice). The fight between corporate and autonomous institutes (in my country) and a complete failure of the system to strike a balance between the two. Also remember that the narrative that tries to dictate to you the requirements of being a doctor can never be real. You define your own presence and no amount of seniority/power/ money should be able to change your point of view (your beliefs).
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Guadalupe’s Answer

I debated for a long time about attending med school. I knew I wanted to work in the medical field but I knew I was not dedicated to the school portion of it all. In short I did not go to med school. One of the hardest things that come from med school is all the hours you must put into studying, lecture, reviewing etc. Your social life will essentially become non existent, I believe that it is a HUGE reward becoming a doctor but you have to be dedicated to it. Low grade will NOT slide, med school is extremely competitive and the weak links will not make it past the first year. If you put your mind to it and have the internal motivation needed to succeed, you can most definitely do it!
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