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What are jobs in the medical field that don't require going to medical school?

Ever since I was little, I wanted to be a doctor. Now that I have become a high school student, I've done research about what it takes to go to medical school. Helping and interacting with others is what I want to do. Although, I don't think I have what it takes to go into medical school. medicine doctor medical medical-school healthcare nurse

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John’s Answer

If you want to enter the healthcare industry but you don’t have an interest in getting your medical degree, you’re in luck Athena, because there are a number of healthcare jobs that don’t require med school.

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

JOB DESCRIPTION – As a Physician Assistant (PA) you will work closely with a team of physicians and surgeons after becoming nationally certified and state licensed. PAs have responsibilities similar to a doctor; PAs take medical history, conduct physical exams, order tests and read the results, prescribe medication, assist in surgery, draw up treatment plans, diagnose patients, treat patients, and more. It’s a role that involves much of what a doctor does, without the extra years of education or financial burden that medical school can bring. Lengthy educational preparation is required, but is still shorter than going to medical school followed by a residency program. This is a growing field with plenty of opportunities and high salaries. Ongoing education is required for periodic recertification.

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS – Training to become a physician assistant is extensive and involves both a bachelor's degree and a further two-year master's program. You will also be required to complete 100 hours of continuing education every two years that you are a practicing PA. Once you become nationally certified and licensed in the state you will be practicing in, you can start working as a PA. While it doesn’t require medical school, physician assistants must be committed to continuing education throughout their career. You will have to take courses to keep up to date on the latest medical information and state licenses often have specific continuing education requirements in order to remain licensed.

SALARY OUTLOOK – The average salary for a Physician Assistant is around $96,500 per year with a bachelor’s degree and $124,000 with a master’s degree.. 24% of Physician Assistant work in doctors' offices, while 51% are employed in hospitals. Job growth for physician assistants is projected to be 31% between 2020 and 2028.

HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATOR

JOB DESCRIPTION – Health services administration is another healthcare job that doesn’t require a medical degree but will allow you to work in a hospital or healthcare setting. It’s an emerging field that is quickly growing as more hospitals adapt electronic health records. Implementing new software and managing it requires more staff and people who can keep track of changing policies. Health services administration refers to the process of directing, supervising and planning the delivery of medical treatment to patients. Individuals working in health services administration must be comfortable with a range of professional duties that include government regulations, healthcare management and business administration. At least a bachelor's degree is required to become a health service administrator, a major in health administration is recommended.

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS – With a bachelor's or master's degree in health services administration, there are many career options to consider. Health service administrators work as hospital or clinical managers, or may oversee operations in a doctor's office or nursing home. Certification is voluntary for most job opportunities, although it is required for those who choose to work in nursing home administration. Employers tend to seek health services managers with graduate education in areas related to medicine, such as public health and health sciences. In addition to knowledge of science and health, desirable candidates for health services administration jobs will also have formal education in management and finance.

SALARY OUTLOOK – The average salary for a health services administrator is around $88,500 per year with a bachelor’s degree. Earnings for medical and health services managers can also vary between geographic locations. Total employment in medical and health services management is expected to increase 18% from 2018-2028.

RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGIST

JOB DESCRIPTION – Radiologic technologist are responsible for taking x-rays, CT scans, and MRIs of patients. Radiological technologists, or radiographers, produce images of internal organs and bones in the human body. Coursework in this field includes training in the equipment used for radiology, and students are also introduced to issues regarding patient care, anatomy, medical terminology and regulations relevant to radiological technologists. Students learn which diseases and injuries are commonly detected through radiographic imaging. The ability to identify diseases and injuries helps radiological technologists evaluate images and communicate findings to a doctor. Vocabulary related to disease is introduced in this course.

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS – To become a radiologic technologist you will need at least a 2-year associate’s degree, which is the most common degree that radiologists hold. Students intending to earn certification or licensing in this field should seek out programs that are accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT). These courses will include both classroom instruction and clinical practice. Students review principles of physics and become familiar with radiation dosages before learning how to use imaging equipment. Different types of equipment used by radiological technologists, including X-ray, mammography and ultrasound technology, are introduced. Laws and regulations related to imaging equipment use are also reviewed.

SALARY OUTLOOK – The average salary for a radiologic technologist is around $55,000 per year with an associate’s degree, compared to $62,900 with a bachelor’s degree and $74,500 with a master’s degree. Total employment in medical and health services management is expected to increase 22% from 2020-2028.

Hope this was Helpful Athena
This was very helpful! Thank you for your detailed response. Athena R.
Your Welcome Athena, It was my Pleasure. Too many of us are not living our dreams because we are living our fears. John Frick
Thank You Robert. “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” — Winston Churchill John Frick
Thank You Hari. “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” — Mahatma Gandhi John Frick
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Catherine’s Answer

Hi Athena,

I also put a desire to help people at the center of my career choice. The two careers I was considering were physical therapy and biomedical engineering.

Physical therapy is a great choice if you enjoy interacting with people. You are working with patients an hour at a time and work them through any aches and pains they are feeling. You help them perform exercises and rehab them to health. You could also become more than just their medical advisor and even turn into a mentor or friend for your patients. Occupational therapy is a similar in career path as well.

Biomedical engineering allows you to design new solutions to healthcare problems that healthcare professionals need. This has a broad range of areas - from biomechanics (ex.: hip implants, exoskeletons, surgical tools), biomaterials (ex.: tissue and cell research) and bioinstrumentation (ex.: ventilators, x-ray/MRI machines, brain research), you can specialize in any area that interests you and pursue a career in research or industry. While you are not working directly with patients, you need to have a perspective on what patients need and work with your team to deliver a product or therapy that addresses it in a safe and effective way.

I ultimately chose biomedical engineering because I really enjoyed the problem solving aspect that the job requires but I feel like I would have enjoyed a career in physical therapy as well. The medical field has multiple avenues for you to make a difference so I encourage you to explore and find one that fascinates you! Don't let a curriculum intimidate you - if you're interested in what you are learning you will rise to the occasion and do well because you will ENJOY it!

Best of luck,
Catherine

Catherine recommends the following next steps:

Look up STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) jobs.
Research college curriculum for potential major to see if the course work interests you.
Talk to friends and family about your interests - chances are they know someone in the field and can put you in touch with them to learn more.
I am a Biomed Engineer and I love my job! Juan Vazquez
I was also looking into physical therapy, but I have never thought about biomedical engineering. It sounds very interesting! Thanks for your input. I will definitely look into biomedical engineering. You were very helpful :) Athena R.
Excellent! Glad I could help. The most important thing is to find something you are passionate about - the rest will take care of itself! Catherine Andrus
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Tom’s Answer

Hi Athena,
I work as an Engineer in Research and Development in the Medical Device Industry and think this could be a good option for you that's a little bit different, as it means that you can design new ways and tools to help doctors and patients without working in a hospital.
We interact with doctors and medical staff a lot so that we can design products that really help to make their jobs a little bit easier and try to come up with new ways to help people with illnesses to live their best lives.
You don't need to know a huge amount about Biology (the more the better) but if you like technical things, coming up with new ideas and problem solving while mainly keeping away from blood then this area could be a good idea.
I just saw that Sarah also said a similar thing so there's more than one of us that think it could be a good choice :o)
Best of luck, Tom
This is a great guidance. In the Medical Device industry you have so many options to have a fulfilling career that impacts others. We have a need for most types of engineers, not just biomedical engineers which is a strong perception. Wendy Hawker
Thank you for your answer! Yes, I do think that being an engineer in the medical field is a great idea. I never really thought of it before. Now that I have an open mind, I'm sure I'll find something that really interests me Athena R.
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Amanda’s Answer

Hello, great question and there have been lots of great answers as well. There are so many options for you. One thing you will want to focus on is do you want to be involved with clients face to face or would you rather be behind the scenes? Medical device, research, field sales reps in medical device are options if you don't want to be as much client facing. Otherwise, there are options in the health and wellness field; corporate wellness, PT/PTA, OT, etc. I went to school for Exercise Science and work in corporate wellness for a medical device company. It's a great combination between clients facing and behind the scenes work helping employees stay engaged with their wellbeing.
Thanks for the insight! This will definitely help me chose a career path. Athena R.
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Sarah’s Answer

Hi Athena,

Bioengineering could be a great fit for you! I went to collage (University of Toledo) wanting to get my degree in pre-med and go off to Medical School. I was lucky that my collage offered a degree that was both bioengineering and pre-med combined. I am very grateful that I made the decision to choose this major. The more Engineering classes I took the more I loved it, and the less I enjoyed organic Chemistry. At the end of the five year program I was ready to leave school and find a job as an engineer as 4 more years of schooling in pre-med no longer seemed like a route I wanted to take.

As a bioengineer I work at a medical device company helping to design and manufacture spinal implants. It is a very rewarding job knowing that the work I do every day helps people. I am still involved in health care and spend time talking to surgeons, and going to cadaver labs to learn more about how to create a better product to be used in surgeries.

Good luck!
Sarah
Thanks! This was very helpful. Bioengineering sounds very interesting. I will definitely do more research about them. Athena R.
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Tom’s Answer

Hi Athena,
I work as an Engineer in Research and Development in the Medical Device Industry and think this could be a good option for you that's a little bit different, as it means that you can design new ways and tools to help doctors and patients without working in a hospital.
We interact with doctors and medical staff a lot so that we can design products that really help to make their jobs a little bit easier and try to come up with new ways to help people with illnesses to live their best lives.
You don't need to know a huge amount about Biology (the more the better) but if you like technical things, coming up with new ideas and problem solving while mainly keeping away from blood then this area could be a good idea.
I just saw that Sarah also said a similar thing so there's more than one of us that think it could be a good choice :o)
Best of luck, Tom
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Susie’s Answer

I wanted to add that if you like solving puzzles, you might be interested in Medical Billing and Coding. In this profession, you need to figure out which codes apply to a person's medical visit or diagnosis.
Thanks for your response! Athena R.
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Mary’s Answer

I went to Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) school (can be 1 or 2 semesters) right after high school in order to get some entry level experience into the medical field to see if healthcare was the right tract for me. Going to EMT school gave me the ability to work on an ambulance and respond to 911 calls. It was a very fulfilling job and reassured me that the medical field is the right fit for me. I am now pursuing becoming a physician assistant and have a couple of interviews lined up for programs!

There are many opportunities in medicine and medical school is not the only route, but if it what your mind is set on I would go for it!

Best of luck!

Mary
Thank for your response! I was also looking into becoming a physician assistant. I hope your interviews go well. Athena R.
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Shericka’s Answer

Hello,

There are several careers in healthcare that do not require you to go to medical school. I agree with several of the answers previously listed. To add, take a look at the business side of healthcare. A healthcare Sales Representative is a rewarding career to look into. They are responsible for selling medical products/services to hospitals, clinics, doctors' offices, and healthcare professionals. The medical sales industry is steadily growing and always looking for new talent. You can choose to sell for pharmaceutical companies or equipment manufacturers. A healthcare Sales Representative can promote products, answer questions, provide consultation and much more.
Thank you for your response. I never thought about going into the business path in the medical field. I will look into it. Athena R.
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Stacie’s Answer

There are a number of areas you can go into within the medical industry without going to medical school. By obtaining a general business degree you could work for a medical device company in various areas (Sales, Quality, Marketing, and Research). Working in any of these areas is a wonderful way to contribute to the medical industry while not having to obtain a Medical degree.
Hi Athena, Great question! I also think all of then answers here are great opportunities. I was also in the same boat, and Medschool just was not feasible at that point in time in my career. I went a different route and went to school for business. I have always had a passion for the medical world, and also using my interpersonal skills. With these skills I entered into the Medical Device Sales world. The training was right up my alley, and quite challenging. The job itself is personally rewarding helping to shape and help lives. You get to see procedures daily and make an actual impact. These careers can often have great financial reward as well! Good Luck! Mike McGuire
Thank you for your response! I think that is a great idea. Athena R.
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Rachel’s Answer

Have faith in yourself - you may have what it takes to go to medical school! There are tons of jobs in the medical field - medical equipment technicians, laboratory technicians, physician assistants. Also, you could consider hospital administation - most hospitals are a business so they need people to help support the day to day activities of running and managine a hosptial - finance, logistics, staffing.
Thank you for your response. Thanks for the encouragement as well! Athena R.
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Camellia’s Answer

You don't have to be a doctor or nurse to work in the medical field. There are many other facets. I am a service engineer - this involves installation, repair & testing of medical equipment in the hospitals.
You either study an engineering course at university, or technician course at college.
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Jiejing’s Answer

Hi, becoming a doctor or nurse is a great opportunity to help and interact with others. However, there are many other positions in medical field that don't require going to a medical school. For example, a Biostatistician. I received trainings in statistics, and start first job at Tufts Medical School as a Biostatistician. It is very rewarding to work with doctors/nurses on medical research, and to add knowledge to a broad library.
Thanks for your response! Athena R.
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Heidi’s Answer

Hi Athena! Thanks for asking your question. A career in Medical Device manufacturing could be a great way to leverage your interests in the medical field. Your career path could take you to an Engineering (design or product development), Manufacturing (Engineering, Supervisor, Quality Assurance to name a small sampling) or Sales/Marketing position. Many roles in medical device organizations will allow you to participate in supporting products that directly impact the patients by providing services and solutions to positively benefit the healthcare industry.
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Hari’s Answer

Hi Athena,
It is wonderful that you want to help and interact with people.
There are many great professions in the healthcare area that can still help improve and sustain human health. There are great answers already listed. Here is some more info.
Medical Devices:
a) R&D (with degree in Engineering - Biomedical, Electrical, Mechanical, Software)
b) Manufacturing (with degree in Engineering - Electrical, Mechanical, Software, Industrial)
c) Field Clinical/Support Engineer (with degree in Biomedical Engineering)
Pharmaceuticals:
a) R&D (with degree in Engineering - Biomedical, Electrical, Mechanical, Software)
b) Manufacturing (with degree in Engineering - Electrical, Mechanical, Software, Chemical, Industrial)
Hospitals/Clinics: Nursing – LPN, RN, NP (with degree in Nursing, or advanced degree for RN/NP)

Good Luck with your education and pursuit of what you want to do.
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Lauren’s Answer

I have just started my career working as a cardiac device specialist for Medtronic. Medtronic is a large healthcare company that serve people in all different realms of healthcare. I've always wanted to help people

My specific role is being the expert on Medtronic's cardiac medical devices, i.e. pacemakers and defibrillators, working alongside hospital staff and doctors to implant these devices in patients that need them. So I am in implants with the doctor making sure that the devices are working properly and then also get to work with patients on follow-up checks to make sure the device is truly helping the patient.

It is a really great industry because I am within healthcare, helping so many patients, but there is also a little bit of a business aspect to it too. I absolutely love Medtronic's simple, yet profound mission statement as I think it embodies what we strive to do every day: "Alleviate Pain, Restore Health, and Extend Life".

Hope this helps!
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Myra’s Answer

Hi Athena! I've seen a lot of great advice given to you and as you can tell you have a broad range of options. I work at Medtronic (medical device company) in clinical research. In the clinical research department we are responsible for setting up, monitoring and ensuring the clinical trials are conducted in compliance to the local, national and federal regulations to ensure our products are safe and effective. It is multi-faceted where you need to work with a lot of stakeholders and functions/departments within the company (i.e., Research and Development, Regulatory, Marketing, Supply Chain, Quality, etc.) as well as build strong relationships with the hospitals and staff conducting the clinical studies. Working in the medical device industry is an option as well as working in a hospital setting as a Clinical Research Coordinator. Great Clinical Research Coordinators are vital to clinical research as they interact with the patients, doctors and clinical study sponsors. Like you, I am also motivated to help and interact with others and have found clinical research to be a great fit for that. Good luck!
Thank you for your response! It was very helpful. Yes, I have been getting a lot of good advice, and many people said that they work at Medtronic. Thanks for giving more detail about what you do. Athena R.
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Geoffrey’s Answer

The field of healthcare is quite broad. You can get into healthcare management through professional programs or even into areas related to process improvement for healthcare facilities. There are also online programs than can help guide you there, such as https://bit.ly/3d7GICq
Thank you for your response and the link you provided! Athena R.
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Kristine’s Answer

Some of these may be repeats from other answers but there are several options.

Public Health Administration
Rehab careers such as: Orthotics/Prosthetics, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech/Language Pathology, Art Therapy, Mustic Therapy, etc.
Hospital Administration if you prefer more of a business focus
Research - ex.: biochemistry, pharmacology, clinical research
Bio Tech- medical device manugacturer
Thanks for giving me these ideas. Pathology sounds interesting... Athena R.
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Lauren’s Answer

I have just started my career working as a cardiac device specialist for Medtronic. Medtronic is a large healthcare company that serve people in all different realms of healthcare. I've always wanted to help people

My specific role is being the expert on Medtronic's cardiac medical devices, i.e. pacemakers and defibrillators, working alongside hospital staff and doctors to implant these devices in patients that need them. So I am in implants with the doctor making sure that the devices are working properly and then also get to work with patients on follow-up checks to make sure the device is truly helping the patient.

It is a really great industry because I am within healthcare, helping so many patients, but there is also a little bit of a business aspect to it too. I absolutely love Medtronic's simple, yet profound mission statement as I think it embodies what we strive to do every day: "Alleviate Pain, Restore Health, and Extend Life".

Hope this helps!
Thanks for your response! Your job sounds like it's really interesting. Athena R.
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Liz’s Answer

The medical field is a large industry with many diverse aspects such as insurance companies, medical manufacturing companies, medical suppliers, medical writers, medical legal professionals. Each of these areas support the medical industry. Also there are many departments within hospitals too.
Thank you for your response! Athena R.
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Camellia’s Answer

You don't have to be a doctor or nurse to work in the medical field. There are many other facets. I am a service engineer - this involves installation, repair & testing of medical equipment in the hospitals.
You either study an engineering course at university, or technician course at college.
Thank you for your response! Athena R.
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Richard’s Answer

Some options to consider:
Nurse, Nurse Midwife, Nurse Practitioner, CRNA

Imaging technologist including xray, CT, MRI, Nuclear Medicine, Ultrasound, inverventional/cath lab

Lab technologist or phlebotomist

OR technologist

PA

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Maria’s Answer

Have you thought about healthcare management?
Hi Maria, can you please provide a little more information on what healthcare management is? Gurpreet Lally, Admin
Of course …that is a career path you can choose and go to school for ….it will allow you to work in the hospital setting but on the admin side. This involves dealing with back office work...paperwork, account receivables, staff etc. If you wish to have interaction with patients, you can also focus on becoming a patient advocate/ social worker. Best of luck Maria Selagea
Thank you for your response and clarification! Athena R.
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Eunice’s Answer

Hi Athena, if you like interacting with others, you may consider the pharmaceutic aspects at which you can consider being a pharmacist or pharmacy technician. Instead of focusing which degree that doesn't require entry to medical school, try to think about what's your aspiration and which area of the healthcare sector that interest you most. From that, I think it will be easier for you to go forward in choosing the right degree at uni. I know it may sound obscured but it's really important that you will enjoy what you've chosen and that can be something you are doing in your upcoming 10 years +. Cheers :)
Thank you for your time and insightful thinking! Athena R.
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Heidi’s Answer

Hi Athena! Thanks for asking your question. A career in Medical Device manufacturing could be a great way to leverage your interests in the medical field. Your career path could take you to an Engineering (design or product development), Manufacturing (Engineering, Supervisor, Quality Assurance to name a small sampling) or Sales/Marketing position. Many roles in medical device organizations will allow you to participate in supporting products that directly impact the patients by providing services and solutions to positively benefit the healthcare industry.
Great feedback Heidi!! Wendy Hawker
Thanks for your response! I will definitely look into engineering. Athena R.
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Christopher’s Answer

As mentioned above, there are an abundant amount of careers available to you that will help you in assisting others. My father suffered a stroke when I was in High School and we ended up finding out that he had a congenital heart condition. He soon recovered fully but it fed my interest in getting into the medical field. I had considered becoming a heart doctor but I felt the same as you. I initially went to school for Radiologic Technology, obtained an Associate's Degree and took x-ray's for multiple years before becoming a Clinical Trainer. I eventually went back to school and obtained my Bachelor's Degree at 28 years old. This allowed me to get into the Medical Device world and I absolutely love it. You help in multiple different facets depending on the type of job you have. There are a lot of Clinical jobs available, some of which are patient facing, while others are geared toward helping the physician and staff with outcomes to improve patient health. For me it's rewarding by helping Physician's in procedures to have the best outcomes for their patients. While I don't have any interaction with the patient or their families, I'm still helping the greater cause in the overall grand scheme of things.

Other opportunities for you to consider would be:
Nursing
Physical Therapy
Speech Therapy
Respiratory Therapy
Radiation Therapy
Ultrasound
Thank you! This response was very helpful. I tore my acl six months ago, and this experience has also inspired me to become a physical therapist, but I'm still not sure what I want to be yet. Athena R.
Physical Therapy would be a great way for you to be able to connect to others. In addition, some people really enjoy Sales and becoming a Orthopedic Sales Rep may be something else you may want to consider as well. The company I worked for prior did Robotic Assisted Knee and Hip surgeries and I know multiple people who are in Reconstruction within the Medical Device field really enjoy being in cases and helping assist with cases. There are so many routes you can take within healthcare! Christopher Wise, BA, RT(R)
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Amanda’s Answer

Hello, great question and there have been lots of great answers as well. There are so many options for you. One thing you will want to focus on is do you want to be involved with clients face to face or would you rather be behind the scenes? Medical device, research, field sales reps in medical device are options if you don't want to be as much client facing. Otherwise, there are options in the health and wellness field; corporate wellness, PT/PTA, OT, etc. I went to school for Exercise Science and work in corporate wellness for a medical device company. It's a great combination between clients facing and behind the scenes work helping employees stay engaged with their wellbeing.
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Miranda’s Answer

Hi Athena,

A great avenue to be in the medical field without going to medical school, as many have mentioned, is engineering.

Specifically with biomedical engineering or a life science degree it gives you the opportunity to explore alternatives while discovering what you like! You could go onto a graduate degree as a physical therapist, physician assistant, occupational therapist (and many others).

You also could consider jobs like medical device representative where you could be in an operating room or out patient facility helping health care providers use a companies product.

There are so many options available to you even without an engineering degree, but knowing you'd like to help people will give you a lot of options :)

Good Luck!

Thank you for your response! Yes, many people have mentioned that engineering is a great job to get into in the medical field. I am actually getting really interested in it. Athena R.
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Maxine’s Answer

I think an important question to ask yourself is how many years you want to spend in school after college graduation. Medical school requires many years of study, working as a resident, and if you want to become a specialist you'll need to dedicate additional years on top of that. Several of the other professions (nursing, physician assistant, etc.) also have requirements on the number of years of study. All of these also have an associated cost, so you'll want to weigh those factors as well. Lastly, you should think about what kind of lifestyle you would like to have, for example, a physical therapist works normal hours 9-5 while a nurse in the Emergency Department could work 12-14 hour shifts, sometimes overnight, and have other days off.

Ultimately I decided to choose to pursue an engineering degree and then work in the medical device company because I didn't want to spend so much money and additional years on schooling, and it was really important for me to be able to have normal hours so I could also have a family. It ended up being a really great choice, but if you really want to work with people directly as a healthcare professional you may want to look at options directly in the healthcare field such as nursing, physician assistant, etc.
Thanks for your response! It was very helpful. I haven't really been taking external factors into consideration when trying to find a career path. This will help narrow down quite a few options. Athena R.
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Hailey’s Answer

Hello!

First, I would say if you really want to be a doctor, you still have so much time to figure out how to do that. Not everyone goes to medical school right after college; many take gap years, get more degrees, or decide they want to go to medical school after they've had a career in something else. There are also DO schools, which are essentially like MD schools with a slightly different perspective. These are typically easier to get into than MD schools in the United States. So, I know how daunting the whole process seems, but if this is really your goal you should go for it! College could give you a different perspective as well. I would recommend volunteering in hospitals or shadowing physicians to see where your interests lie.

Other things to look into could be Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology, or Occupational Therapy. All of these jobs have fewer years of schooling (I am unsure of the requirements to get in though) and have the opportunity to work with patients in hospitals, as well as outpatient settings.

Best of luck!
Thank you for your response! You were very helpful. Although medical school does sound very intimidating, maybe I will decide to go for it in the future. Athena R.
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Savanna (Savi)’s Answer

Hi Athena,

I was in a similar position as you. I decided in college to switch my interest in healthcare. One thing that really helped me open my eyes to all the different opportunities was to volunteer or work at a health center. There you can get exposed to clinical work, administrative work, etc, which might help you identify areas of interest. For me, it made me aware of some things I also wasn't interested in, which was just as vital to knock things off my list. Another thing that helps is reaching out to people LinkedIn or family friends to learn more about what they do and who they could refer you to to continue to learn more. This helps build your network and learn more about your interests. The healthcare field is broad, so don't feel like you have to identify the perfect opportunity right away.

Hope that helps!
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Kristine’s Answer

Some of these may be repeats from other answers but there are several options.

Public Health Administration
Rehab careers such as: Orthotics/Prosthetics, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Speech/Language Pathology, Art Therapy, Mustic Therapy, etc.
Hospital Administration if you prefer more of a business focus
Research - ex.: biochemistry, pharmacology, clinical research
Bio Tech- medical device manugacturer
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Casey’s Answer

Hi Athena!

I am currently working at Medtronic where we make Medical Devices that are used to help improve or save people's lives. My degree in actually in Chemical Engineering, but I work more on the biomed/mechanical engineering side. A lot of what you use in your job you will learn on the job. Medical Device is a very rewarding field that will provide you with plenty of opportunities to still interact with patients, doctors, physicians, and more. You can get plenty of experience in the hospital and still help people without going to medical school.
Thanks for your response! The medical device field sounds cool. I will definitely look into it. Athena R.
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Mike’s Answer

Hi Athena,

Great question! I also think all of then answers here are great opportunities. I was also in the same boat, and Medschool just was not feasible at that point in time in my career. I went a different route and went to school for business. I have always had a passion for the medical world, and also using my interpersonal skills.

With these skills I entered into the Medical Device Sales world. The training was right up my alley, and quite challenging. The job itself is personally rewarding helping to shape and help lives. You get to see procedures daily and make an actual impact. These careers can often have great financial reward as well! Good Luck!
Thank you for your response ! Athena R.
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