Skip to main content
4 answers
6
Asked 150 views Translate

What does it take to become a sports analyst?

I enjoy watching and analyzing sports and I want to know what it takes to become an analyst.

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

4 answers


1
Updated Translate

John’s Answer

I would focus on a variety of things such as learning general statistics so that you can understand how statistics work in every day life. With the understanding of statistics and statistical models, values, and assumptions, you will be able to apply it to how sports statistics play an important part in sports analysis (including commentating, announcing, and reporting the sports news). I would also not limit yourself to any sports. The wider knowledge you have on all sports will be very useful to you in many ways. I would also suggest that you try to participate in the sports if even just one time. This will provide you with hands on (kinesthetic) experience rather than just hearsay or only watching others doing/playing sports. This will help you to incorporate your own opinions of the particular sports experience and views of the sports and analysis you are providing. Lastly, I would not hesitate to reach out to a sports analyst or even a sports broadcaster or journalist to see if you might be able to complete an internship or a single day of shadowing in their work day. This is possible, so never fall into the trap of not believing or chasing your dream. Best of luck and remember that the core principle in sports is the same as it is in life. It is about competing against yourself, focusing on self-improvement, being better than you were the day before, and making that journey fun and positive no matter if it is your best performance day or your worst. Play ball!
Thank you comment icon Thank you for taking the time to help. Micah
1
1
Updated Translate

Tyler’s Answer

Becoming an sports analyst would be exciting, Micah!

I would second John's answer - learning more about statistics and statistical models will help you in your path of becoming a sports analyst. Many Stats professors at colleges have networks you can tap into that would hopefully help you find people in the field.

Many broadcasters working at both major and minor sports leagues have need for a data analyst or someone who gathers and analyzes data for them. Look for these kind of internships & opportunities as this can jumpstart your career in ways you can't imagine. Having a background in stats only makes you more competitive.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Micah
1
0
Updated Translate

Brad’s Answer

Hi Micah,

I think a lot of great suggestions have been made in the other answers shared. I would echo the advice given. Find a way to dive in data and stats. Today's sports are using more and more data and analytics to understand how athletes are performing and where they can improve. Taking a step to become knowledgeable in this field is a great first step and do so across all sports. As someone who is passionate about basketball I have been reading up on the use of analytics in the sport. Kirk Goldsberry has a great book out right now about how the NBA shifted to a prolific 3P shooting league. I suggest taking a look at Sprawlball! Additionally, listen to podcasts and find twitter accounts that are dedicated to data and stats.

Secondly, you can also begin finding a way to dissect film. It even may be as easy as watching games and paying attention to when analysts break down plays. Obviously, it takes having knowledge of the game to dissect film but you can learn a lot by watching and listening to others who are experts in the field!

Best of Luck,

Brad
0
0
Updated Translate

Arsham’s Answer

Sports analysts (the ones you see on tv) are generally journalists, broadcasters, or have some form of education in communication. Analysts have good social skills and are generally strong writers and communicators.

Another career that may interest you is a Data Analyst (with a focus in sports.) These analysts provide the stats and analytics that go behind sports. They would be tasked with finding information such as: This player averages 30 points per game, takes 60% of their shots from this area, or this team has won 75% of their games at home. This type of career has less of a focus on communicating, but requires more technical knowledge.
0