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Would you suggest going to trade school or straight too the industry?

Welding School?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Richard’s Answer

That depends on if you have the money to buy equipment or not. Or if the job has training. If you don't then a trade school is a good choice because the equipment will be available for you although I recommend you bring your own materials and do tig welding. example: pieces of metal to weld in various materials and filler rod for each material and practicing fillet joints and butt joints using backup fixtures. And then get into pipe welding which is a different animal. Trade school was awesome back in the day but with YouTube you could learn everything and anything.
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Jeff’s Answer

That depends a lot on whether you are looking to learn how to read weld blueprints and symbols (like AWS weld symbols and prints). If you just want to become a production welder and learn how to literally weld metal together and that's it, then jumping straight into an entry-level welder position where they are willing to train you on using just a single piece of equipment (for example, a Mig welder), to do just a certain kind of welds, then that's fine. However, if you are wanting to pursue a career into engineering for welding as say a Weld Engineer or Manufacturing Engineer, going to a Vocational School that teaches you not only how to weld but also provides classroom teaching on weld engineering and how to read the actual AWS blueprints, which are VERY different than standard blueprints, as well as the symbols used for all types of welds and processes of welding (Mig, Tig, SMAW or "stick", laser). Schools will also usually teach you how to properly set and use Oxyacetylene torches, plasma cutters, varying speeds on the various weld machine process types and voltages and amps needed. So, it depends on whether you just want to get a job as a production piece welder or going into a career involving welding and the engineering side of things. It also never hurts to have an actual diploma/certificate from a school to include in your resume portfolio for any future career path.

Hope this helped a little and good luck in your career endeavors!

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