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Where to start as a fresh EMT?

When I become an EMT, where should i start? a hospital's "In house" ambulance service, a fire department, or an independent ambulance contractor for the local area? what are the benefits to either approach, what's seen as the better choice for beginners?

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Jonathan’s Answer

Emergency medical technician positions have an inherent vocation stepping stool essentially at the early profession stages. At the point when you complete your most memorable preparation, you're delegated an EMT-Basic. You can be named an EMT-Intermediate subsequent to filling in as an EMT-Basic and finishing extra preparation and authorizing necessities. With time, you can climb to the degree of paramedic.




Some arrive at this level, however, and feel that it is as yet adequately not. Others start searching for choices while still at the EMT level. The adrenaline rush can go downhill inevitably. The anxiety can appear to be too high, the remuneration excessively low. Luckily, individuals who have been fruitful as EMTs or paramedics are appealing possibility for other medical care programs. To diminish pressure or cut the actual requests down, you should think about turning into an emergency room technician. Emergency room technicians play out the more fundamental assignments in a trauma center setting. Degree finishing, however, can bring fundamentally better open doors.
Thank you comment icon You rock! This advice is very helpful. David
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Todd D.’s Answer

I agree with Matthew...best bet is probably to start with a private service. It is a good place to learn medicine. By this I mean anyone can do trauma, you know, band aids on bleeding. (inter-facility) Transports gives you the ability to talk with your patients. "Why do you take this medicine?" What happens if you don't take this medicine?" "How does being on hemodialysis affect you on a day by day basis?"

Don't expect to learn it all in one day, one month, or even one year. Wait a while before even thinking about paramedic school. You need the experience first.
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Inga’s Answer

Have you thought about working for Amazon? An Onsite Medical Representative is considered to be a leadership role where you are eligible for Stocks and Bonuses when hired. They are looking for basic EMT Certifications only. Preference is to teach first aid / CPR and AED to the other managers.
Thank you comment icon Thanks for your encouragement! David
Thank you comment icon Most Amazon fulfillment centers use a staffing agency for this. Todd D. Filener
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Matthew’s Answer

So each of the options have their own pros/cons, although I have found that a privatized EMS/Ambulance Agency has been a really great first step to learn the basics of EMS response that you will use in each of the available options (Fire, Private, Hospital, etc). Private Ambulance is a good way to test and see if you will like EMS, and will show you what you enjoy most (between Fire, Paramedic, and Nursing) since you will be working so closely with them day-to-day.
Thank you comment icon Thank you so much for the advice. David
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Brittany’s Answer

EMT here, and I agree with Matthew's answer completely. When you do your EMT class, you have to do clinical rotations that give you some exposure to the different settings. You get to see the inner workings of the hospital, ambulance, etc. For me personally, seeing those inner workings, I felt most at home at the fire department. But the fire department here is slow in regards to calls within a day, so I want to get some stuff-hitting-the-fan experience before I settle into fire. Which led me to want to work at an ambulance company first. The one near where I live is technically private, but it covers 15 surrounding cities, so there's a constant stream of calls. So, my current goal is to work with the ambulance company for a bit, get my hands dirty, finish my Paramedics in the meantime, and then eventually settle into fire. As Matthew pointed out, there are pros/cons to each. On an ambulance (at this specific company), an EMT can not do ANYTHING invasive, including IVs, whereas at the county hospital here, they teach their EMTs to be able to do a number of invasive things, including IVs and ultrasound IVs, giving those EMTs a step up if/when they decide to pursue Paramedic. Ultimately, the only way you're really going to get a feel for what you personally want to do is exposure to that element. Most places will let you shadow someone specific for a day, so you can get a better idea of what works for you.
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