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Of what importance is the university of a student if he wants to get a good job ??

I also want to know that if I can change my career after completing my engineering , I mean like if I get degree in EC can I get a job related to CS or IT ?? #engineering #career #jobs #salary #development

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Sean’s Answer

Great question. I would say that no matter what school you go to and what your degree is in, there are always options in life. The only challenge is that when you switch, you essentially have to "start over" to a some degree(depending on how dramatically different the career change is).


Here's my story...I went to school to get my liberal studies degree not sure if I'd want to eventually get into education or law. After college and before grad school I tried out the corporate world then fell into the recruiting field. I decided to go into education and taught 6 years, and a few years back decided to revisit the corporate world. Has the switch set me back a few years? Sure. But, was the career transition worth it because I'm happy? Absolutely.


Essentially, anything is doable with the right attitude, work ethic, and determination.

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Tina’s Answer

Really really good questions! Wholeheartedly agree with Matthew above. To add onto that, it depends on what you want to do, what experiences you want to have, etc. If you have an idea of what you want to do you could start by looking on LinkedIn to see what requirements those jobs might have or where they went to university. If you aren't yet sure what you want to do, you could talk with your high school counselor who should be able to help. There is an assessment you can take that can give you proposed majors and also possible colleges. Here are the top career aptitude quizzes https://student-tutor.com/blog/top-career-tests-for-high-school-students. As for your second question, please don't worry too much about pivoting to new fields. I think many of us find we don't end up doing the same things we graduated in or that as we grow and are promoted, we try new things. I had a Computer Science degree and today I lead Learning & Development for my company. One final piece of advice, I would caution against spending a lot of money and taking too many loans. I think there are better options out there. It may not be a popular opinion but it's difficult to see how much debt many come out of university with now. That's a tough way to start your new life out. Make sure you consider your interests but also that in future we are more evolving to continuous and life long learning.
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Matthew’s Answer

Hi Yash - good questions! The selection of a university is very important. People often talk about "the right fit" when selecting a college or university. Some important questions to ask are: i) does this school have the major or majors I'm interested in? ii) how far away is it from home? iii) where are students getting hired when they graduate from a given school or program? Notice I didn't say anything about rank or cost... iv) are these places I would like to work? Having "the right fit" will help you adjust to university life, find activities and friends that you enjoy, and provide you with the training and education you need for a career.


As to your second question... I would like to share my personal experience. I studied chemical engineering at UMass Amherst, but when I graduated I worked from Microsoft doing software testing on the Windows 7 project. While this isn't a common path, its certainly possible to change your career after completing an engineering degree IF you pick up skills that are transferable. Switching from EC to CS or IT sounds like a much easier switch to me, though you'd probably have to get some internships or extra training to demonstrate you're the right person for the job.


I hope this help and good luck!
Matt P.
Boston, MA

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