Skip to main content
2 answers
2
Asked 430 views

How to start a career in welding or plumbing?

How should I get involved early and what should I do to practice these jobs?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

2

2 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Tim’s Answer

Hi Jimmy,
Have you looked into trade educators and apprenticeships on these fields (welding, plumbing) in your area? Have you tried calling up plumbing companies to investigate if you could volunteer your services to learn these trades, for example?

If investigating residential plumbing, for example, I would suggest understanding the nuances of how houses get built with plumbing today, and how that has changed over the past 20+ years. Over time, the best things in plumbing may have changed. For example, gas-powered tank water heaters were/are very common, but seem to be trending toward tankless, or electric heat pumps now.

Knowing how to turn off the main valve of a house is one thing, but plumbing can span much more. Installing of plumbing for new construction, inspecting previously installed plumbing and making necessary repairs, understanding appropriate regulations for systems inspection, dealing with water heaters, toilets, bathtubs, faucets, clogs, and possibly septic tanks. Understanding safety for yourself and those you work with is critical, as is logistical things like communicating well with team members, clients, keeping work logs and detailed reports, so that you can ensure client satisfaction.

These are all just things to consider though as you get into plumbing.

Tim recommends the following next steps:

Look for Trade Apprenticeships in your area, or contact plumbing companies that are willing to take on apprentices or helpers.
Learn plumbing and welding safety (if not already there); then practice plumbing/welding techniques and/or get your hands dirty
1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Mark’s Answer

Hi Jimmy,
In addition to Tim's great suggestions, you might try local trade schools and some of their night classes designed as "introduction to....". They are usually inexpensive, scheduled outside of normal school/work hours and would be a good way of getting an idea of what you would be getting into. They are also usually run by people who have been in the industry for decades and who are dying to help and guide people like you and I.
I did this for welding because I was thinking of it as a hobby and fell in love with it, took multiple courses and practice it to this day.
Best of luck!
-M
0