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college for farming?

I currently work for my grandpa dad and uncle and own my own cattle was wondering if i should attend college for agronomy so if farming would fall through i would have something to fall back on

Thank you comment icon Yes. I think that would be a great idea because it is never a bad idea to have something to fall back on! Tayden
Thank you comment icon I'm not in a career that makes me an expert to answer your question; however, I am thrilled to hear a young person who is interested in pursuing such an important field - where would we all be without the necessary food supply? I think that it is important to be educated in the field, plus I would seek out professional agricultural associations where perhaps you could intern with experienced farmers or at least have a forum to ask them questions. Go for it, and thank you for looking to be a hard-working adult that will contribute such an important part of all of our lives! Kathleen Zalesak

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Justin’s Answer

Yes, you should attend if you can. It's a double benefit. Not only would it give you the foundational knowledge to compliment your hands-on experience but it enables you to network and expand your skills. Farming is constantly changing and evolving and it would help you stay current and learn about new technology, processes and trends. A degree doesn't guarantee you a job but it is a leg up and some career fields require you to have a degree.
Thank you comment icon I appreciate your support, Justin Colton
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Colton,

Contemplating College for Cultivating Careers
It's a common thought among those in agriculture to contemplate furthering their education in a related field. This idea often stems from a wish to broaden their skill set and knowledge base, providing a safety net if farming doesn't prove profitable. Agronomy, the study of crops and soil management, is one such field.

When considering college for agronomy, it's crucial to balance the pros and cons. On the positive side, earning a degree in agronomy can lay a solid foundation in agricultural science, plant biology, and soil management. This knowledge can be a game-changer for those aiming to level up their farming careers or explore related sectors. Moreover, a college degree can unlock new career paths, like roles in agricultural research institutions, government agencies, or private agribusiness firms.

On the flip side, not everyone may need a degree in agronomy. If you're deeply rooted in farming and have a robust practical understanding of the industry, your existing skills may serve your needs well. Remember, college can be a substantial financial commitment, and it's vital to ponder the potential return on investment before deciding to embark on a degree program.

To make a well-informed decision, you should thoroughly assess your current situation, long-term aspirations, and the potential perks of attending college for agronomy. It's key to explore the specific courses and programs offered by different colleges, and consider the reputation and resources of each institution.

In summary, earning a college degree in agronomy can be a worthwhile investment for those keen to expand their skills and knowledge in agriculture. However, it's crucial to thoughtfully consider your personal circumstances, goals, and the potential advantages of college before making your decision.

3 Credible Reference Titles
1. “The Economic Benefits of Higher Education in Agriculture: A Review.” Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, 2018. This comprehensive review discusses how a college degree can lead to increased job opportunities, higher earnings, and greater job satisfaction.

2. “Agricultural Education and Training: Opportunities for Employment and Entrepreneurship.” International Journal of Agricultural Extension Education, 2019. This study emphasizes the importance of a well-rounded education in agriculture, including agronomy, for individuals aiming to advance their careers.

3. “The Role of Agricultural Colleges and Universities in Developing Human Capital for the 21st Century.” Agricultural Systems, 2020. This article underscores the importance of interdisciplinary education, including agronomy, in preparing students for the complex challenges faced by the agriculture sector in the 21st century.

Do take a moment to read my autobiography in the 'About James' section. It includes information about foods that are rich in nutrients that boost mental function, work performance, and physical endurance. Thanks for reading!

May you be abundantly blessed, as you so deserve!
James Constantine.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hi Colton,

Is College for Agronomy Worth It If You Already Run a Farm?

If you're contemplating the idea of studying agronomy in college as a safety net for your farming enterprise, there are several key points to ponder before deciding.

Why You Should Consider College for Agronomy:

Deepen Your Knowledge and Skills: An agronomy degree can equip you with in-depth understanding and expertise in areas like soil management, crop cultivation, pest management, and other agricultural facets, thereby improving your farming techniques.

Expand Your Network: College can be a gateway to invaluable connections with teachers, classmates, and industry experts, keeping you abreast of the newest trends and technologies in farming.

Broaden Your Horizons: A background in agronomy can broaden your skill range and pave the way for opportunities in related sectors such as agricultural consultation, research, or agribusiness.

Increase Your Versatility: Should your farming business hit a rough patch or if you wish to explore other career paths, an agronomy degree can offer you a flexible qualification that's relevant across multiple agricultural sectors.

Points to Ponder Before Deciding:

Cost: Assess the financial implications of college against the potential perks it could bring to your farming enterprise or future career options.

Time: Think about how a degree might affect your current farm duties and whether you can juggle both effectively.

Personal Aspirations: Contemplate your long-term career aspirations and whether formal agronomy education aligns with these goals.

Seek Advice: Obtain insights from farming professionals, academic counselors, or career advisors on the potential benefits of an agronomy degree.

In Conclusion:

The choice to pursue agronomy in college as a fallback for your farming business hinges on your personal situation, objectives, and resources. While formal education can bring valuable knowledge and opportunities, it's crucial to balance the pros and cons thoroughly before committing.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used:

US Department of Agriculture (USDA): The USDA offers extensive information on farming programs, resources, and learning opportunities to help individuals make well-informed choices about agricultural careers.

American Society of Agronomy (ASA): ASA, a prominent professional body, provides insights into the agronomy field, including educational routes, industry trends, and networking opportunities for budding agronomists.

National Association of Agricultural Educators (NAAE): NAAE offers resources and support for those interested in agricultural education and career growth, providing guidance on academic programs and professional routes in the farming sector.

Stay Blessed!
James Constantine.
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Paulo Ricardo’s Answer

Yes, you would have several areas to be turning to with an agronomy degree. The agronomist works in all stages of agribusiness with the aim of improving the productivity and quality of crops and livestock. This professional can work with soil preparation, planting, and harvesting, or with animal feeding, breeding, health, and slaughter.
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Anthony’s Answer

Possibly! If farming falls through, what type of job could you get after college with an Agronomy degree? If you're happy with the duties/growth/salary for that type of job, then I think that's a great plan. Just remember to align your college degree with your life goals!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, Anthony for the advice. Colton
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