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My degree is supply chain management, is it worth it to pursue a masters?

My degree is supply chain management. Is it worth it getting a masters? how much salary increase are we talking? Is it better to go up the corporate ladder and secure a managerial position. Everyone is telling me to get a masters but I am a person that genuinely hates school. Always did. I'm not worried about the money because eventually I will find a way to make big bank. I just feel lately that a supply chain degree alone without a masters is like useless.

Also I need top marks in all of my courses if I want to do masters and to be honest I just want to pass and relax and not worry about getting 90's and 80's.

Thank you comment icon I'm not from the supply chain field, but I have a MicroMasters from MITx in Supply Chain Management- if I wanted I could take it to pursue a Master's degree as well (it is accepted for credit at many renowned institutions around the world). For me, regardless of whether I pursued the masters or not, the value was in the learning. If you genuinely hate school, I recommend considering alternative forms of learning and growth that might get you to where you want to be. You will have to ask yourself a couple of questions, such as: What does a masters offer you that you cannot get through job experience and personal learning (and can we challenge any of these beliefs via alternative forms of learning)? Jason Pang
Thank you comment icon Hello Marwan, sorry for that, most people don't like sch, not you alone as you said. But one thing for sure about school is we always increase our knowledge and better our way of life, Once you have the strength 💪 try your best to advance I knowledge acquisition it may help you in the future. Emmanuel Acquah

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Subject: Career question for you

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Edward’s Answer

In addition to the other responses provided, I would recommend reviewing the Institute for Supply Management (ISM) annual salary report. This report will show you Supply Chain and Procurement specific salary details, inclusive of education, experience, and certification(s). Once you have this information, you can focus on the mid-level or lower range of salary based upon your ambition to pass/relax and not focus on 80s/90s. Should you desire more reward or compensation for your work, you may want to work harder for higher marks.

Edward recommends the following next steps:

visit ISM for salary differences of Supply Chain professionals with/without a Master's degree
Determine long term career aspirations & job title/rate of pay
Realize that the lower range of salary will be earned by those new to the role and/or the poor performers
If your salary expectations are above the mid-range for any position, you would do well to earn better grades
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Samantha M’s Answer

A master's degree doesn't really differ all that much from a bachelor's, in my opinion and personal experience. Your experience, your work, and your perseverance are what make you unique and will help you advance your career. I've been working in supply chain for almost 20 years, and I have a degree in journalism and communications. Through my own efforts and those of no one else during my career, I have managed to move up the corporate ladder in supply chain. A degree may have helped me get a job, but the ascent to the top had nothing to do with it. Over the years, I have pursued numerous opportunities in various aspects of supply chain, and that experience is what has made me who I am today; a leading expert in the field, an innovator in the field, and what has helped me advance my career. There are many different supply chain functions in almost every business, which is one of the great things about supply chain. Demand forecasting, inventory management, supply planning, production planning, transportation, warehousing, raw material planning, purchasing and procurement, among other things, are all examples. The experiences you have in as many of the areas and functions under the supply chain umbrella as you can are what makes you valuable, what will set you apart from others and what will determine how successful you are.
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Soh-Ling’s Answer

I would personally advise that before embarking on a postgraduate course, you consider first gaining more work experience in your field of interest. By accumulating practical, hands-on experience in the working world, you can develop a clearer understanding of which industries or specializations resonate with you the most. This informed perspective can then guide you in making a more educated decision regarding the specific postgraduate course you choose to pursue.

Spending some time working before pursuing further education can be hugely beneficial in various ways. Not only will you gain valuable insights into the day-to-day realities of a particular sector or job role, but you will also develop a range of relevant skill sets which will improve your employability prospects. Furthermore, work experience can help you build a professional network that can offer guidance, mentorship, and potential job opportunities when you eventually complete your postgraduate studies.

In addition, understanding your long-term career goals will enable you to select a postgraduate program that aligns with your aspirations, ensuring that you invest your time, energy, and financial resources wisely. You may even discover new areas of interest while working that you were previously unaware of, broadening your horizons and informing your academic pursuits.

In summary, it would be prudent to first acquire more work experience before registering for a postgraduate course. This experience will not only help you identify your career path and specializations of interest but also increase your employability, expand your professional network, and better prepare you for the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead.
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Peter’s Answer

Hi Marwan. My advice would be to only pursue a Masters degree if you are genuinely interested in expanding your knowledge in a specific area. A Masters degree is not an essential requirement for many jobs and you do not have to undertake a Masters immediately after completing your degree. In my case, I have a primary degree in Business and Law and I completed my Masters after gaining 2-3 years of work experience in a corporate environment when I identified an area that I was particularly interested in specializing in (International Management). When I completed my primary degree I really had no intention to study ever again! While you might not have the motivation/interest at the moment to go straight back into studying, after gaining some work experience you may identify an area, that might be related or unrelated to your primary degree, that appeals to you and you may then decide to undertake a Masters or another form of education/training to gain some knowledge in that area. Best of luck! Thanks. Peter.
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David’s Answer

Whenever I was hiring, I hired the person for fit and attitude. Could this person adapt to the tasks, how would this person adapt to the ways of the company. I have seen more and more candidates coming with Masters in Supply Chain and Ive seen this as the industry getting more competitive.
If you have some companies in mind that you would like to work for, it would be good to understand from their HR on how they view having a Masters. You could contact them and ask the question. This would give you guidance also.
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Juliana’s Answer

Hi there,
I would not recommend a masters until you have some work experience. This is because to get the most out of your masters degree, having real world experience to apply it to, is valuable. There's a lot to learn about the supply chain that is not in a text book and there are opportunities to develop skills and expertise, while in the role. Additionally, supply chain is one of those areas that continually changes and always has different situations and challenges to address - just look at what occurred through the pandemic!). Supply Chain has a very flexible career path. I've supported supply chain from multiple perspectives (Procurement, FP&A, Accounting, Cost Accounting, IT, Manufacturing, Shared Services, Strategy and Logistics), lets just say, you can never be bored, there is breadth and depth of learning and there is upward mobility career wise. If you enjoy learning by doing and working with operational and cross functional business partners, you don't need to get your masters to be successful.

On the pay side, with no work experience, it's likely only a 2-5k annual pay difference to your undergrad! This is nothing in the grand scheme of things, and promotability is based on results, softskills & leadership, not on whether you have your masters or not.
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