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I want to be a Supply Chain Enginer, Corperate exceutive, or a high ranking supply chain offial. I was wondering what degree I should double major with supply chain management?

Does going to a prestigous university make any diffrence aqquring a job in this field? How stressful is a supply chain management major and the jobs? How would I need to network to achieve my goals?

Thank you comment icon Hi Andrew, Jill provided very good links for you to review; and I agree with Shirley that Finance is a good consideration for your double major. It's critical to understand all financial statements as well as understand the financial impacts that daily decisions have on the business longer term. Best of luck in your studies! Kelly Tobey

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Subject: Career question for you

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Jill’s Answer

Hi Andrew,

Getting a degree in supply chain management is an excellent path to achieving your goals. Here’s a link to an article on the top Universities https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/rankings/business-supply-chain-management-logistics

Supply chain touches every step in the product life cycle; from growing, mining or creating a material to delivering it into the hands of the consumer, plus all the activities in between: sales and operations planning, new product development and engineering, risk management, corporate social responsibility, and so much more. Here’s a great link to check out the field: https://www.ascm.org/membership-community/career-resources/supply-chain-management-careers/

From my experience, if you like problem solving then supply chain is great for a career. The executives in Supply Chain of the future need to understand the supply chain from end to end.

In general I’ve found the four main entry points to supply chain tend to be:
Procurement/Purchasing – professionals in this role like to negotiate, work with people and contracts.
Operations – professionals in this role like to be actively ensuring the warehouses, plants, etc. are getting it done!
Planning – professionals in this role love the math, they use machine learning, AI, and more.
Transportation – professionals in this role love the stress of solving how to move things around the world by truck, plane, boat, train and more!

To get started networking, assuming you go to college, I recommend joining the college's Supply Chain Management Student Group/Club!

Jill recommends the following next steps:

check out https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/rankings/business-supply-chain-management-logistics
Thank you comment icon Thank you for giving me advice. Andrew
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Darlene’s Answer

Great career path! In addition to finance, I would suggest considering other functions that are not directly tied to traditional supply chain roles such as international business. Many global supply chains have to consider the implications of doing business in various countries (i.e. geopolitical implications, local laws, etc.). Another suggestion is data analytics as it will be important to be able to analyze and slice and dice data in order to make informed decisions.

Best of luck to you!
Thank you comment icon I appreciate this, thank you for the advice. Andrew
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Andrew,

Answer:

Pursuing a Double Major with Supply Chain Management: To enrich your Supply Chain Management studies, consider a double major in a field that complements the complexities of supply chain operations. Popular double major options include Operations Management, Logistics, Business Administration, Industrial Engineering, or Information Systems. These disciplines offer a robust grounding in areas closely linked to supply chain management and can bolster your abilities for roles in this sector.

The Advantage of Studying at a Renowned University: Studying at a renowned university can significantly influence your job prospects in the supply chain management field. Such institutions often have solid ties with leading companies, provide extensive networking opportunities, and deliver top-tier education recognized by employers. Moreover, the university's reputation can pave the way and provide you with a competitive advantage during job hunting.

Stress Levels in Supply Chain Management: The stress levels in supply chain management studies and related occupations can fluctuate based on factors like the industry, organizational culture, and specific job role. Supply chain management entails managing intricate operations, logistics, process optimization, and unexpected challenges such as supply chain disruptions. While it can be intense at times due to the requirement for accuracy and rapid decision-making, many professionals find it fulfilling and thrive in this vibrant setting.

Networking Approaches for Career Aspirations: Networking is vital in realizing your career aspirations in the supply chain management sector. To cultivate a robust network, consider becoming a member of professional bodies like the Association for Supply Chain Management (ASCM) or Institute for Supply Chain Management (ISM). Participate in industry conferences, seminars, and workshops to engage with field professionals. Leverage online platforms such as LinkedIn to broaden your network and stay abreast of industry developments. Fostering relationships with mentors, professors, alumni, and industry professionals can offer invaluable insights, opportunities, and support as you strive to become a successful supply chain engineer or executive.

By merging a strong educational foundation with strategic networking endeavors, you can boost your prospects of landing fulfilling roles in the supply chain management industry.

Top 3 Credible Sources Used:

Harvard Business Review: The Harvard Business Review delivers insights into diverse business subjects such as supply chain management techniques, industry trends, and career growth advice.

Association for Supply Chain Management (ASCM): ASCM provides resources, certifications, and networking opportunities for supply chain management professionals.

Institute for Supply Management (ISM): ISM is a premier organization dedicated to advancing procurement and supply management practices through education and research.

These sources played a key role in offering precise and trustworthy information on supply chain management education, career trajectories, networking approaches, and industry perspectives.

GOD BLESS!
James Constantine Frangos.
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Karim’s Answer

Hello Andrew!

As far as double majoring, something with technical expertise provides a really great insight when paired with supply chain management, because the further you can see into the life cycle of a product, the better equipped you will be to foresee any problems that could arise. For example, while I didn't expect to have supply chain roles as a Mechanical Engineer, my background in manufacturing has lead me to find supplier quotes that are way more expensive that were proposed, and have higher responsibilities in Supply Chain in more critical projects.

It doesn't have to be engineering per se, but that kind of technical background knowledge will make you that much more attractive to future employers.

Good luck!
Thank you comment icon I will use this advice as I prepare for my career. Andrew
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Shirley’s Answer

Hi Andrew,

I agree with Jill's answer. A degree in supply chain management will give you the end to end view of supply chain. Networking is also very key to progressing in your career. I would also suggest finance as a double major to help you understand the balance sheet of the organization you're planning to lead in the feature.


Best of luck!
Thank you comment icon Thank you, this is amazing! I really needed it. Andrew
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Jason’s Answer

Andrew
To supplement your Supply Chain Management major I would suggest Data Analytics or Data Science. Our industry is shifting to automation and data intensity. Grasp on to that early.

As far as colleges go. The big name does not matter. What matters is getting experience and positioning yourself coming out. Be sure to get an internship during school so you come out with practical experience. Also target a company that has a leadership development program. Those are 2 year rotational programs straight out of college. You will get great experience and springboard your leadership career.

Jason
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