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How do you transition from being a college student to working in your field in the real world?

By the time I graduate college, I will have been studying digital media for four years. I want to know how you transition from the classroom to your career and work place.
#career #digital-media #digital-marketing #college

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Yuna’s Answer

Hello,
The transition may be quite different when it comes to college vs. real work environment. However, since you are going into a brand new position there are plenty of resources provided by varying companies as well as a training process to help you settle in and adjust to a new workplace. There are still some aspects you can utilize from college to the workplace such as collaboration skills with your new co-workers, asking questions, learning, etc.
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Laura’s Answer

One of the best ways to prepare for a career in digital marketing is to apply for internships or part-time, college careers in digital marketing. If you're attending a college/university, you can see what type of careers that they have available or internships that you can apply for. Internships are a great way to build up your skillset and experience the working world. You can also do research about the different types of careers in digital marketing. Looking through career sites, like Glassdoor, is a great way to learn more about what careers are out there.
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Kaitlyn’s Answer

Hi there!
Let's start at the beginning. Either throughout your last semester of college or after Graduation, you will begin applying to jobs. These jobs will typically be entry-level or require 1-2 years of experience. One important thing to note: internships and previous work experience can count towards those years of experience so do not let it discourage you from applying.

Once you have applied, the next step is an interview process followed by an offer-letter. Typically offer-letters will include information on your salary, start date, and any additional requirements your employment is contingent on (this could be drug tests or background checks, etc.).

When everything is complete with the hiring process, your first few weeks at your new job usually revolve around training/learning the specific job-requirements. You'll meet your new co-workers, go through HR-training, and get settled.

This is sometimes when culture shock of "oh..I'm not in college anymore." kicks in. To combat that, join young-professional groups in the area (google should be able to point you to a few) and do things to remain social (for example, I joined a recreational kickball league). And also remember, while you may not have summers off anymore, you at least have no homework!

Your first job out of college is exciting because it also means a salary. This opens up the door for many things but most importantly - a budget. Make sure the things you buy (or rent) do not exceed your new income. Keep your rent, car loans, student loans within a reasonable amount.

Beyond this, most classroom skills are very transferrable to the office world. For example, in meetings - take notes! Ask questions. Make sure you understand the task at hand. There are still group projects except now, they are real-problems you are solving with your team. Presentations still happen as well - speaking and PowerPoint skills are always needed.

Best of luck!
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Kah Heng’s Answer

Hello,

The working and classroom environment differs vastly.
In the work environment, being proactive is key in getting the right footing when you step into the industry.
Be prepared to learn, ask smart questions and participate in discussions/meetings.
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Sarah’s Answer

It will certainly feel different, but you will adjust! One of the best ways to understand what it is like to be working full time and to get a feel for different professional environments is through internships. Hopefully your program will offer at least one, but I would encourage you to intern at at least 2 different companies before you begin your full time career. Internships are a great way to gain professional experience in a supportive environment, and gives you a great opportunity to learn from professionals and to understand what it takes to succeed in your specific career path!
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Catrina’s Answer

Hi Sydney,

For any position to start, there will be an on-boarding/training process. You will learn the ropes for your new position, expectations for the job, and culture for your new work environment. Although you will have graduated from college, you should still be ready to learn in your new role! My best advice is to ask questions, work hard, and establish a good, solid work ethic that is respected by your supervisors and peers. Connect with a mentor, if you haven't already, and look to excel in your field by joining professional organizations, attending conferences, and participating in relevant training. Best wishes!
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Belladean’s Answer

This is a good question about your next steps after achieving your goal of graduating! Through your academic years, you will be exposed to business cases, projects and assignments that are designed to replicate a real world example. The learnings from each assignment are going to bring new challenges that you or your team will have to solve. Take the time to really understand what they're asking, think about the actual problem and how you/team will go after it.

When you start looking the transition, use what you have learned in school and approach the world with purpose. Internships are a great opportunity for you to understand how a company/team runs their organization. Apprenticeships are also something to look into and consider. As you learn more about what job(s) you like, you should look to show your work ethic, show your value (show them how incredibly smart you are!), and a mentor is someone who will understand you and show you ways that you can get even better!
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