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What is typically a minimum length of employment at a company before you can master core competencies?

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Rafia I.’s Answer

I would say 1-2 years. If it is first ever job right after college then 6 months to learn the systems, getting used to of corporate culture etc. Then you start absorbing fundamentals about the business. Second year is when you start contributing in terms of opinions, suggestions.
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Amy’s Answer

Excellent question!

The right amount of time is dependant on the type of work, your experience and many other factors. Generally I would say that it will take 1-2 years in your first/second position to gain the knowledge and confidence necessary to fully contribute, but as you move up, this will likely take longer. The higher up you go, the more time it will likely take to be fully confident and contributing at that level. This is because entry level jobs (first/second position) are often task oriented, so once you have mastered the task, you are ready for something more. Next level jobs often require more strategic work and broader knowledge. You are not mastering tasks, you are setting and implementing the strategy for the people doing the tasks. This takes more time to develop and master. Many people move quickly up early in their careers, and then become frustrated by not moving as quickly, but don't realize that it takes more time to develop the skills as your span of influence expands.

My advice is be relentlessly curious about the business, learn everything you can about the job, but don't wait until you have mastered it 100% before you look for your next move, or you will have waited too long.
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Lance’s Answer

I do not believe this is something that you can put a time on. Depending on the type of work, your work ethic, your training, your management and your work culture are all things that can affect this. In my opinion, the time period in which it takes to 'master' certain aspects of your position will be evident when coworkers come to you for help and answers as well as management putting you in a position to lead your group.
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Gennie A’s Answer

Hi, I wish I could say 6 months or a year, but it depends on the job. Some positions change constantly with the changes in the marketplace, you could spend your career trying to master the position. Others are technology based, and technology reinvents itself every six months, so just when you master it...a new version comes out and off you go again. Only you know for sure, your experience at the position and that point when you go from asking questions to people asking you for the answers is a good turning point. Best of luck.
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Stephanie’s Answer

When do you master "core competencies" for a particular job? First of all, make sure to participate in all job related trainings. Ask questions when you are unsure. Double check your work. Try to find a mentor to shadow.

Even after doing these things, you may never "master" core competencies - I'm not sure if we truly master anything. I think we can get really good at something, but I think it takes time and practice to master anything.

Here's a funny video that might help you understand the concept:

How To Master Any Skill (Become Top 1%)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oq65fZr7wi8

Take care and keep practicing,

Stephanie
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Shanti’s Answer

As a few other people have mentioned, "mastery" of something takes time and dedication to learn everything possible about that thing.

In general, during the first 6 months somewhere, you are learning the basics - what systems and tools are used, general processes, daily routines, and the team you work with. It's time where you take a lot of notes and just act like a sponge, absorbing everything you can.

Around 6 months to 1 year, you are asking a lot of questions. You may know a term or a tool but not understand its significance or use. You are just starting to connect the dots but probably don't have the information to fill in the picture.

After 1 year, you should be able to ask questions and provide possible solutions. This is when you might think you know the answer but it's ok to double check with those more tenured around you.

After 2 years, I would expect that you are a person who supplies more answers than questions and might even be seen as a resource to those around you!
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Sounak’s Answer

It is all about People, Process and Technology. You have know the people in your organization, create your inner and outer circle within the org. Learning of processes within the org helps you manoeuvre within the people leading to approvals to get things right. Last is the Tech piece. It depends on how fast you learn the technology. For some it might take 6 months and for some it might take ages. Working hard does not always help; you have to be street smart and work smart.
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Fred’s Answer

Typically 10K hr at a profession will be a good estimation for becoming an expert, that can be accomplished by working for one company or multiple ones in similar fields
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Erwin’s Answer

Hello, I would say 1-3 years depending on the position you are holding and if you have moved within the company during that time.
Review and understand the company's Credo or Mission Statement so you know what the company wants to be known for or
how it wants to be seen by customers. Ask questions, engage yourself in employee development suited around the corporate culture.
Volunteer and shadow others in departments that you work along with and if possible connect with a mentor and you will find that
you will master these core competencies easily over time. The more you engage, the shorter the timeframe.
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