Skip to main content
4 answers
5
Asked 174 views

How do I draw a line for myself between the amount of time I spend studying versus relaxing?

Note: this is part of our Professionals series where volunteers share questions they wish they saw on the platform

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

5

4 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

Drawing a line between study time and relaxation time is a personal journey, and it's all about striking the right balance. Here are a few suggestions to help you:

- Make use of an agenda to plan your day. It can be as detailed or as broad as you like, encompassing everything or just the key tasks.
- Establish clear boundaries. For instance, consider taking a 15-minute break after every two hours of studying.
- Set aside time for activities you love. This will help you return to your studies refreshed and recharged.
- Prioritize your tasks. Identify the most important topics for the day and focus on those.

There are various tools you can utilize to assist you in this process:

- Calendar applications like Google Calendar or the calendar on your phone.
- Productivity applications such as Trello, Kanban apps, or note-taking apps.
- Timer applications like Pomodoro apps, your phone's timer, or even traditional clocks.

Remember, it's all about finding a balance that works for you. You've got this!
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ivan’s Answer

The precise amount of time needed for learning truly varies from person to person. Some individuals grasp key concepts effortlessly, while others require more time to dive deep into the material to fully understand the subject. However, it's crucial to remember that learning is a natural part of life. Embrace a spirit of curiosity and seize every chance to learn something new, be it within the classroom or beyond its walls. The least beneficial approach would be to cram for an exam by studying 12 hours a day for a week, only to 'relax' afterwards and forget everything while enjoying time at the beach. Instead, make learning an ongoing, enjoyable journey.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Katie’s Answer

When you give yourself time to step away and recharge it will actually be more beneficial, so be intentional about scheduling this in between study sessions. Don't feel guilty about it, because it is essential. Here is a good article that talks about how "relaxing for a few days helps rewire your brain and prepare it for further challenges." https://www.vedantu.com/blog/benefits-of-relaxation-between-study-sessions
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Marshall’s Answer

Greetings-

This is called work life balance and it's a skill that you will continue to work on over the course of your entire life. There are a lot of factors that play into this, but at its core is to find a balance and that will really be specific to you personally.

Some things, like a term paper, a bill/ rent, or a doctors appointment, will have a hard deadline. Things with hard deadlines should take priority over other things with soft deadlines, like watching the latest episode of your favorite show.

If you are a very analytical type person: you have 24 hours in a day or 168 hours in a week. Knowing that, what do you need to, want to accomplish this week? Sleeping some is a good idea, so is maybe running errands like grocery shopping and cooking dinner. Maybe you have a term paper to do and classes to attend. Maybe you have a significant other to spend time with. If you designate time to those things it will give you a portion remaining that you can start to flex things out. (if you like breaking things down into metrics). (sleep 6h/day, shopping 1h/week etc)

If you like lists, laying things out might help you visualize this. There are a could different charts and forms out there you can use as well. You can research things like "productivity or project management".

Things don't have to be in big pieces either. For example, if you are studying and you find you are having trouble concentrating, get up, take a walk to the mailbox or make yourself a tea. That time is a break from the study, allows you to do a quick reset and get some blood flowing. Then come back and keep going. Set your alarm to go off every XX hours to remind you to get up, take a mental break, go to the bathroom, get something to eat or drink etc.

Having a reward system can also be helpful: If I get this chapter finished, I can go get a coffee or have a bowl of ice cream. Or maybe, once this term paper is finished I can go out with friends for a drink or food or go ot the park for a run. If I get my tasks done today I can play a game or have a drink or dessert.

Sometimes you can do both at the same time: you may enjoy reading and relaxing and can read your assigned books in a place you enjoy (under a snuggle blanket or somewhere in nature by a lake or river).

Overall the goal should be to be sure that things that need to get done are prioritized over things that don't need to be done. While doing so make sure you don't burn out. Taking small (5-10 min) breaks is useful. Change tasks, come back to this one later if you are struggling. Have an accountability partner. Someone who can help be sure you are staying on task if thats a challenge for you.

As you move further in life: Taking [if possible] one day per month to allow yourself to do things on your list that aren't work related is also important (can be a weekend, or week day if possible - I call these my mental health days and do it usually on a day when I don't have a lot of meetings or work tasks that need to be done so I don't feel stress of things building up). Taking vacation [break], allowing yourself to disconnect once and a while is healthy. Hobbies can also help with this and give you some of that relaxing time while accomplishing other things.
0