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What kind of classes do I need to take to become a lawyer? And what should i major in?

Do internships help?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Doc’s Answer

Yanet there is no single or “correct” path to law school. However, there are classes that can help build fundamental writing skills, sharpen analytical thinking skills, and enhance your understanding of specifics subjects that will serve you well in law.

WRITING AND PUBLIC SPEAKING
As a lawyer, you're going to talk—a lot. Since that's the case, you might as well get good at it. Public speaking and debate classes will help you hone your skills immensely. Lawyers also do a lot of writing and thinking, which is where writing and logic courses could certainly help you, If you're able to take both.

GOVERNMENT, POLITICS AND HISTORY
Most courses in these departments delve into the mechanics of the law, as well as how they create the judicial infrastructure that guides government and politics themselves. Seeing as they're all inextricably linked to a degree, you can't really go wrong taking any of these classes.

BUSINESS AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
If you're going into business law, then it makes perfect sense to knock a few business courses out while you're still in college. Getting a better understanding of how the business world works will only help you solve the legal problems that inevitably arise within it.

Yanet it's not a guarantee these kinds of classes is a one-way ticket to Attorney-land. Your cumulative undergraduate GPA and LSAT score will ultimately do the heavy lifting for you on your law school applications. But taking a few courses to academically prepare yourself for law school is never a bad move.

Doc recommends the following next steps:

Law schools do not expect applicants to have had any previous legal employment, nor do they generally give any preference to applicants who have had legal internships. If you decide to do a legal internship, you should do it for the other personal benefits, not for the misplaced hope that it will help you get into law school. The primary benefit of a legal internship is that it will likely help you evaluate whether a legal career is a good fit for your strengths and interests. It is hard to know whether you would enjoy any profession without seeing what professionals in that field do on a day-to-day basis.
Thank you comment icon Thank You Kim. The past few years have been a learning sphere under your mentorship. Thank you for teaching me everything I know. Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon Thank You Marva. Volunteerism is the voice of the people put into action. These actions shape and mold the present into a future. Doc Frick
Thank you comment icon ummm, thanks Doc! And thanks for the time and effort you put into your responses! Merry Christmas! Kim Igleheart
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Kim’s Answer

Yanet,

A few random thoughts.
Major in anything you want, the law schools are very flexible and want a diverse student body. What kind of law do you want to practice? Medical malpractice? Take some medical/science courses, they will come in handy! Criminal defense? It's not all about "criminal law." Did your client drive into and kill that pedestrian because he was intoxicated, or was it unavoidable? What was the lighting conditions? Tire tread? Brake pads? Normal reaction time? It's more about science, in this case. . .

But, let me ask you this. Since many lawyers end up not practicing law . . . or people who are law-school bound end up not going to law school, what would you want to be doing if you don't become an attorney? (Plan B)That's a good thing to major in!

Also, have you considered becoming a paralegal? You get to do a lot of the work, the schooling is more skills-focused, and it cost less! It's an option worth exploring. I took some pretty intense paralegal classes. There is a move afoot to let paralegals practice (limited) law. I'm not very familiar with it, but it's designed to make legal help more available to those of limited financial means.

As to classes to take: Make good use of the options you are afforded in college. This includes not only your electives, but also, substitute courses. For example, if you can substitute Constitutional Law for the US Government requirement, do so! Take Logic (usually in the Ethics department), and learn grammar. I have seen more than a few cases that revolved around the interpretation of the written law, based on sentence parts, comma placement etc.

Join clubs such as debate team, Pre-Law, etc, try to become an organization leader. Or, start your own club! Also do some volunteer work. Get involved in the community, not just the school, but also the city/town.

Good luck in your future studies!
Kim
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Baljit’s Answer

Hello Yanet,

- Pursuing a bachelor's degree in business, political science, English, or history could be a beneficial first step. These subjects will provide a solid groundwork for your law studies. Additionally, consider reaching out to the admissions department of your desired school for further advice.

- Next, prepare for the LSAT (Law School Admissions Test). There are numerous resources, such as books and preparatory classes, available to help you succeed. Law schools require this test to assess your academic capabilities.

- Securing internships during law school can significantly enhance your resume. Apply to as many as possible and seek guidance from your law school for application assistance.

- While in law school, you'll need to take a variety of classes, including specialized ones. These may include subjects like torts, moot, contracts, and criminal law.

- Finally, you'll need to pass the bar exam. There are preparatory classes available to help you prepare for this crucial test.

Best of luck on your journey!
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