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What job should I do this?

What should I do as a computer Engineer major?

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Subject: Career question for you

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Russ’s Answer

I think scouting jobs online and seeing factors like what kind of jobs, salary, work/life balance, company values, and etc are what helped me. Perhaps take a look at that! Usually there is a list of popular enough jobs online that you can further research as well that branch under the umbrella of a specific field.
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Wayne’s Answer

Hello Long! Pursuing an engineering degree can pave the way to a multitude of exciting, well-paid, and highly sought-after careers. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics highlights that careers in engineering typically offer salaries above the national median, coupled with a promising growth outlook.

As an engineering student of today, you have a plethora of educational avenues that can lead to excellent job opportunities both in the short and long term.

Here are some fascinating options to consider:

1. Robotics Engineering: The International Federation of Robotics predicts that by 2018, approximately 1.3 million industrial robots will be operational in factories around the globe. These robots are capable of performing tasks once exclusive to humans, such as assembling intricate electronics and assisting in surgeries. As the field of robotics expands and what the IFR terms as the "fourth industrial revolution" unravels, the demand for robotics engineers is set to skyrocket.

2. Water/Environmental Engineering: There's a growing demand for environmental engineers, particularly those specializing in water systems. This surge is due to the increasing focus of many state and local governments on the quality and affordability of their water supplies. Environmental engineers also play a crucial role in designing advanced green energy systems like windmills, hydropower installations, and solar infrastructures. The profession's growth rate is estimated at 12 percent, which is faster than the national average.

3. Data Science and Computational Engineering: Several budding engineering professions merge traditional aspects of mechanical and electrical engineering with principles from newer fields like computer programming and data analytics. Computational engineering exemplifies this blend. Computational engineers possess interdisciplinary expertise, including electrical engineering, mathematics, data science, and computer science, allowing them to tackle problems using statistical modeling, computer algorithms, and other techniques derived from handling large data sets.

4. Aerospace Engineering: Aerospace engineers contribute to the design of aircraft and spacecraft. The demand for these vehicles is expected to remain robust for the foreseeable future. KPMG projects that between 2013 and 2031, the civil aerospace market will require an additional 27,000 passenger aircraft, 24,000 business jets, and 40,000 helicopters. Aerospace engineers are perfectly positioned to meet these demands with their technical prowess and research skills.

5. Virtual and Augmented Reality Engineering: In recent years, virtual and augmented reality have emerged as top priorities for tech giants like Facebook (which acquired VR headset manufacturer Oculus), Google, and Apple. VR/AR projects new imagery onto what someone would see with their naked eyes using a visor or display. It has numerous applications in fields like gaming and advertising. Markets and Markets estimates that by 2022, the VR market alone could be worth $33.9 billion, a significant leap from just over $1 billion in 2015. Engineers with hardware and software expertise will be highly sought after to develop the next generation of VR/AR devices for consumers and businesses.

These are just a few of the thrilling opportunities available for today's engineering students.

I hope this information proves helpful.

Best of luck on your journey!
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Houcine’s Answer

Hi Long,

Choosing a career as a computer engineering major opens up a myriad of possibilities, each tailored to your interests, skills, and preferences. You might explore becoming a software developer, where you'll design and create innovative applications, or delve into hardware engineering, focusing on the intricate details of circuit boards and processors. Network engineering offers the opportunity to design and manage computer networks, ensuring their security and efficiency. Cybersecurity analysts safeguard systems from digital threats, while systems analysts optimize computer systems for functionality and business needs. Alternatively, you could immerse yourself in the realm of data science, extracting insights from complex datasets, or work as an IT consultant, advising businesses on technology solutions. Artificial intelligence and machine learning engineers develop algorithms for cutting-edge applications, while robotics engineers design and build robotic systems across various industries. The key is to explore these diverse paths, considering internships, projects, and mentorship to discover the area within computer engineering that resonates most with your goals and aspirations
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Michael’s Answer

When contemplating if computer engineering is your perfect career match, here are some encouraging pointers to consider:

1. Do you find joy in solving puzzles? As a computer engineer, you'll frequently be in situations where you'll need to assess a scenario, understand the workings of an existing system, identify potential issues, and creatively devise solutions to overcome these challenges.

2. Are you passionate about learning? The realm of technology is a dynamic and fast-paced one, demanding constant learning and flexibility.

3. Do you have a knack for writing instructions, like recipes or DIY guides? Certain roles in this field involve reading and writing code, a process akin to programming.
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Brian’s Answer

When I was in this major I was certain I would work in digital design or low-level hardware development. What I never realized at the time was the depth of software that I would need to understand to complete the degree. The Computer Engineering major you will give you a broad set of skills that could apply to software or hardware development. When you browse job posts online, or go to a job fair, try to get an idea of how you can match the skills you are learning to the most in-demand needs of employers.
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