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Which is better to be accepted into colleges outside of my state and for scholarships, Advanced Placement classes or Dual Credit courses? Are they valued the same by admissions and scholarship committees?

Through out my high school career I have chosen dual credit course or advance placement classes. The teachers were the same for both. The college credit was automatic without the burden of an assessment to determine if I should receive college credit. Also they both had the same point value so I my GPA was getting the same point value boost. However, as I have started to complete more applications outside the state, I don't see where they are asking about dual credit or honors classes. All the questions I have come across have ask about AP classes. So which is better to take?
#advance-placement #dual-credit

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Rachel’s Answer

Most dual credit courses also offer an AP exam. My advice would be to do both. Pay the money to take it as a dual credit class, and then also pay the money and take the AP exam. That way you can choose the more favorable option once you find out what your university offers for each.
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Daniel’s Answer

Both are great! But it depends...

First, each school has its own policies/preferences, some schools have no preference (accept it all), and other schools might not accept any credits.

Also, don't forget that admission officers review your application in context of what academic opportunities exist at your school. So students won't be penalized if they don't have AP because their school didn't offer it, or because they don't have dual-credit. Of course it all helps! You won't get rejected because of those decision; admission officers will be happy that you've challenged yourself and took this initiative, even if the college has policies won't accept your credits.

The best you can do is pass and get good grades. What matters more:
(1) Why did you take the course?
(2) Is it related to your major?
(3) How did the course inspire you?

You can explain this more in an essay. Never underestimate the power of a good story. That's where admission officers get to know you more! Students are more than just a transcript of classes. Overall, admission officers want to see positive character traits (girt, resilience) and that you're not afraid of an academic challenge!
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Maddie’s Answer

Hi Caleb!

It is great that you are starting to think about this. Each college varies on which they will accept. Most schools require you to receive a minimum score on an Advanced Placement test in order to receive college credit. Same goes for Dual Credit courses. My recommendation is to take a look at the school's websites, or reach out to the college admission officer to see what the requirements would be to receive college credit. The best thing to do is to see which ones you would receive college credit for at a university to see which would have a bigger impact on your course requirements should you go to school there.

When I was in high school, the best advice I received was a admissions office would rather see you take the harder class, and have a lower grade than to get the higher grade in an easier class. This shows them that you will work hard and have taken courses that are at the similar level as a college level course.

Best of luck with applying to college!

Maddie

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Marcy’s Answer

Dual credit courses vary by school, and some are more rigorous than others. Colleges and universities have no idea whether you took one of the better ones - or not. AP courses and exams are standardized across schools, so colleges and universities can see how you scored/performed vs. every other student who took that AP course and exam. Therefore I think that AP courses are a better indicator of your capabilities than dual credit courses, and colleges are still more accustomed to seeing those scores and assessing your candidacy based on them. Also colleges usually have standards as to which AP credits apply to which of their courses, while dual credit courses may or may not exempt you from re-taking a similar class once you are in college. My vote is for AP!
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