Skip to main content
2 answers
2
Asked 150 views

Are you making more now then when you started your career?

Why would your salary change depending on your time? How much experience in your workplace does it take to usually get a raise? Does it really all depend on your work exeirence to get a raise or do they also look at the person who you are and determine if you deserve a raise or not?

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

2

2 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Charles’s Answer

Enhancing your career often involves gradual boosts to your salary. However, these increases are directly linked to both your job performance and the overall performance of the organization you work for. Many companies have a yearly review process, while others evaluate new hires after a set period of time, such as 30, 60, or 90 days. Typically, these probationary periods conclude with a pay raise, although this isn't always the case.

Your personal qualities and commitment to your work significantly influence your potential to earn more. Those who excel in their roles and demonstrate a robust work ethic are more likely to receive greater pay raises than those who show less promise or dedication. Ultimately, if you consistently perform well and deliver strong results, you can expect your salary to increase over time.

Promotions also offer an avenue for salary increases and can occur at any point during the year.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Anna’s Answer

There are two factors I would say in getting a raise. One is inflation, and the other is experience.
Many companies will try to give you a small raise every year to offset the cost of inflation. This is an ethical thing to do, but not always possible depending on the company's finances.
The other way to get a raise is with time in a position or promotion to a more difficult position. Experience matters here because the longer you've been doing a job, the better at it you will be. Either you get faster and can get more things done, or you learn how to do it better.
In the work world, you are compensated for what you accomplish - not your potential. Although some bosses might wish they could give you more money because they like you or your work, it always comes down to economics. Your job in some way helps the company make money. If you help them make more money, then they can give you more. If you do good work, but the company is doing poorly, there is no extra money for them to give you.
0