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What are the pros and cons of special ed homeschooling vs. special ed public school?

I am working on a second bachelors degree in mathematics education. I originally planned to teach junior high. I have a son who was is one-year-old and was just diagnosed with cerebral palsy. I can imagine how much fun it would be to home school and I have/will have lots of resources and experience. However, I know that most schools are also equipped with lots of resources that could be helpful to us as well. I don't have to make this decision for my son for a few years, but it will definitely help me make decisions as I shape my education and future career. Any thoughts would be helpful! #education #special-education


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Randle’s Answer

Public schools have far more resources than a home-schooling parent or home-school Co-op, but is less prepared to provide a nurturing environment for your son. For your son, I recommend you fully explore the resources your local public school will be able to provide, look into the resources available from charter schools specializing in special needs students, and comparing these to your resources and the resources of Homeschool Co-ops in your area. Also consider it is not an either / or choice. Consider outside resources plus your own resources.


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Connie’s Answer

Hello,

I was a math teacher in a high school for over 15 years. I used to be totally against home schooling because I felt the need to students to socialize with students their own age was important. I still believe this to a degree. Having worked in the Corporate world for over 25 years, I know that it is critical for students to be able to work in teams and get collaborate with other people to solve problems. So, if you decide to home school, you need to include a team project component.

I believe that the home schooling decision should be based on the needs of your child. Your child will need special education support services. Some schools are better at providing this than others. Whether you choose a charter school, a regular public school, or a private school, you need to make sure that the school can provide the services that your child will need. You will also need to be able to prepare/and or deliver lessons for your child. The fact that you are in a math education degree program tells me that you will have no problem with this. The problem you will face in the future is how will you be able to balance preparing lessons for your child and preparing the lessons for your middle school students once you begin to work. Teaching math can be very challenging -- it is the hardest job that I have ever done. ( and I was a mathematician on the Space Shuttle!). So the big question for you to consider is balancing the instructional needs for your child and the instructional needs for your future middle school students.

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Dawn’s Answer

You are on the right path! The key thing is to explore everything you can now before your son is old enough to enter school. Because schools are under a lot of pressure financially, they might direct your son to a special education class room when he doesn't need one because he is cognitively capable of functioning in a regular education classroom. In this situation attaining a school advocate at local non-profit may be helpful to ensure he is in the most academically appropriate environment. Charter schools are important to research because some are public while others are private. A public charter schools will provide the same level of testing and support a public school will provide. A private charter school is a company using a typical business model. They receive a certain amount of dollars from the state per child sent to that school and their goal is to ensure they stay in the black each year as much as possible to benefit their funders. This type of school model would most likely not go out of their way to provide for a student that requires more resources for educational equity. Homeschooling is always an option and maybe ideal. The school system should still provide testing to evaluate supportive needs depending on state regulations. I'm sure that Utah's department of education would be able to help you determine this in more depth. Also, there may be a local organization with other families of young children with CP that can connect him with socialization skills. Many people have clubs for kids that are homeschooled where they do activities each week together. I hope this was helpful. Many blessings.


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Kendra’s Answer

Good morning Jessica. let me preface this by saying I have been homeschooling 28 years and I have 9 children. Five of My children have graduated highschool, and are pursuing their futures, 4 remain at home. Each child is unique and thrives in an environment that best meets their needs. Of my nine children 2 are special needs due to developmental delay, 1 to ADHD, and another that is a medically fragile child. I absolutely LOVE homeschooling because I can break the mold of what education is supposed to look like and customize it to the ways my child learns best. For example I had a child who HATED history but adored music. So I taught him history based on composers of that time. Of my 4 remaining children at home I have 2 in public school, 2 in homeschooling co-ops. As you learn your young son you will develop a feeling of what type of educational environment he will thrive in. After all you are teaching him now, socially, emotionally, academically (colors, numbers ABCs), spiritually, culturally and medically. You are already homeschooling your precious one. Homeschooling is not an alone activity as it once was there are millions of resources nationwide, discounts to children’s museums, homeschool fairs, co-ops, science fairs, homeschool band and color gaurd, etc. The opportunities are endless and customized to your little man. For legal guidance in your state and multiple local resources please join HSLDA.Org, Homeschool legal defense association. They have attorneys on stand by that cover any difficulties you encounter when choosing to homeschool at no charge to the homeschooling family as a member, membership is around 10 dollars a month. They are a Wealth of amazing information, they have curriculum options, groups for special needs, elementary, middle school, highschool, graduation, GPA, transcripts and so much more. If you have any further questions please reach back out. Enjoy your education adventure.

Kendra

Kendra recommends the following next steps:

HSLDA.Org
Connect with homeschooling parents
Learn the laws in your state through HSLDA
Join a local preschool co-op
Enjoy your learning adventure.

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Shirley’s Answer

Hi a every good question
I have worked in public schools from Pre K - 12th grade all subjects and special needs students for about 20 years as a Guest Educator / Substitute Teacher and I would strongly suggest public school vs homeschool due to the services that the public schools have and also the social interaction is every good for special education students. Also some schools have special events that they attend in the school building The teachers are more loving and accepting of special needs students . Also alot of other staff members come and visit the classroom to get a break from the regular classroom for the special needs students behavior is so much better than the regular students due to their disabilities . Over the years I wish that every regular teacher would be required to spend time each week in a special needs classroom to learn how to love and accept and do discipline better.
Homeschooling is wonderful if you have a support groups for both the student and the parents

Hope this helps alot

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Patricia’s Answer

If you are trying to decide whether to home school your child or place him/her in public school, I would say that an actual school setting is the best --- for several reasons. 1) If it is in NYC, then there is a special district in NYC specifically for the physically disabled, for students with many disabilities, or for students with severe handicaps. That is District 75 which works within the NYC DOE at many, many sites throughout the city.
2) Any child is/should be better off with other students with similar age ranges, etc. They need to socialize!! They need to be amongst their peers. They need to be part of the world we all enter every day, whether working, learning, shopping, etc. Children need to know what that world is like so they can learn about it, adapt to it and be a part of it. 3) Home schooling, provided by an city's educational department may only be a few hours a day--and somewhat temporary. The type of teaching may differ as well. 4) How many parents are prepared to provide a full-time education 5 days a week? Education takes a great deal of preparation and parents are already taking care of their homes, their families, etc. There is already so much to do every day without preparing for educating a child 6 -7 hours a day, 5 days a week. It is a lot to think about....but teaching at home is like running a business out of your home--no rest for the weary.

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Ricardo’s Answer

The process of learning must be as pleasure as possible (and this includes math of course), then you should try on both and ask your son at the proper time, on which one, he feels is better and loves most.


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Darryl’s Answer

The challenge is primarily about resources. Obviously a established/structured of a school district should have more readily available resources to aid in supporting students with special or specific needs

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Tia’s Answer

Through the Internet, we have infinite resources. Time management is key. Establishing a schedule is so important. There are "Meetup" groups, there are so many families who are convinced that home schooling is best for their scholars. I happen to agree.

Creating a network is also important. Contact the schools where the scholar is zoned for; counselors have information. Families with scholars who have IEPs will need to ensure accommodations and modifications are being made.

There are non profit agencies that work with home schooling families. It is quite possible to build a learning environment in places other than a traditional classroom. I started 'teaching' my daughter quite early, and she was reading by the time she was 3. We had school from 9a-2p, and that included breakfast, lunch, nap time and PE.

Tia recommends the following next steps:

Research LOCAL home schooling groups (specifically, non profit)
Meetup on the Internet

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Shirley’s Answer

The public schools etc has alot of resources and support I like the homeschool work due to you can go at your own pace but if you have to take care of your student like feeding and diapering than homeschooling might not be suiteable now days there are alot more support with homeschoolers and there parents etc

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