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Where do you Start to find your interests, college majors, skills, and hobbies?

Find your interests, college majors, skills, and hobbies

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Shirley’s Answer

Hi Adamaris,

Everyone has their own unique interests, and there is no right or wrong place to explore your passions. Sometimes it can be as simple as your childhood hobbies such as building LEGO that sparks your creativity or your academic studies in math or science that intrigues your analytical skills. I recommend taking electives in high school, which are not required classes, but they allow you learn more than your everyday subjects. Some examples from my high school experience: robotics class, intro to accounting, personal finance, marine biology, etc.

I would network with your peers, perhaps join a club or get involved in extracurricular activities in high school. If you find out you don't have much interest in the club, you'll still walk away knowing more people than if you hadn't joined. By building your network, you will find people who can support your career professionally and personally to open up more opportunities.
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James Constantine’s Answer

Hello Adamaris,

RIGHT HERE! www.careervillage.org

Where to Start in Finding Your Interests, College Majors, Skills, and Hobbies

Finding your interests, college majors, skills, and hobbies can be a crucial step in shaping your academic and professional path. Here are some steps to help you navigate this process:

Self-Reflection: Begin by reflecting on your interests, passions, and values. Consider what activities make you feel fulfilled and energized. Think about subjects that have always intrigued you or causes that you are passionate about.

Personality Assessments: Taking personality assessments like the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) or the Holland Code can provide insights into your strengths, preferences, and potential career paths that align with your personality type.

Explore Different Fields: Research various college majors and career options to get a better understanding of what each field entails. Attend career fairs, informational interviews, or job shadowing opportunities to gain firsthand experience.

Skill Assessment: Identify your strengths and weaknesses by assessing your skills. Consider both hard skills (technical abilities) and soft skills (communication, leadership) that you possess or would like to develop.

Seek Guidance: Talk to academic advisors, career counselors, mentors, or professionals in fields of interest for guidance and advice on choosing a suitable major or career path.

Try New Activities: Experiment with different hobbies or extracurricular activities to discover new interests. Join clubs, volunteer organizations, or take up internships to broaden your experiences.

Research Job Market Trends: Investigate current job market trends and future projections for various industries to understand which sectors are growing and offer promising career opportunities.

Networking: Build a professional network by connecting with alumni, industry professionals, and peers who can provide valuable insights into different career paths and help you explore potential opportunities.

Consider Your Goals: Define your long-term goals and aspirations to ensure that your chosen major or career aligns with your vision for the future.

Stay Open-Minded: Keep an open mind throughout the exploration process as interests may evolve over time. Be willing to adapt and explore new possibilities as you learn more about yourself and the world around you.

By following these steps and engaging in self-exploration, research, networking, and guidance-seeking activities, you can start the journey of discovering your interests, college majors, skills, and hobbies effectively.

Top 3 Authoritative Sources Used:

Harvard Business Review: The Harvard Business Review is a reputable source for career development advice, industry insights, and skill-building strategies.

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS): The BLS provides comprehensive data on job market trends, occupational outlooks, salary information, and educational requirements for various professions.

Psychology Today: Psychology Today offers valuable resources on personality assessments, self-reflection techniques, and personal development strategies that can aid in identifying interests and strengths related to career choices.

God Bless, JC.
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Jennifer’s Answer

Probably the easiest way to approach this question - with regards to finding a scholastic and then career path - is to ask yourself what classes you currently enjoy, and then find what jobs stem from what you're currently learning. And keep in mind that instructors can make or break how you feel about a subject. Don't let a poor instructor sway you from a subject that interests you. Especially in college, where there will likely be more than one teacher available for any given class.
To get a more real-world idea of what's out there, I concur with Shirley's advisement - network and join clubs. Both will enable you to meet and talk with more people about their personal experiences, and to make connections which are often invaluable when it comes to forging a career path.
(I remember in a college course, an instructor asks how many students were employed - almost every hand was raised. Then he asked, "Of those you with your hands up, how many of you at least got your foot in the door because of someone you knew?" Most of those hands stayed up.)
Also, I recommend take as many general ed / introductory courses as you have time and money for. This way you can see firsthand what interests you, both by learning and meeting people who are passionate about the subject. Personally, I recommend a community college to start out with for this very reason. Without as many financial pressures, you can take your time to explore the different scholastic paths that are available to you.
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