Skip to main content
3 answers
2
Asked 929 views

How will I survive college?

#career #college #career-options #tips

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

2

3 answers


1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Ken’s Answer

You can survive college! There are two important things that will allow you to prepare for your survival:

  • Getting to know yourself better to develop a clear career focus and then talking to people who are working in that area to get to know what they do, how they got there, and see what suggestions and advice they might have for you.
  • Learning to balance life in college to accomplish your goals and have fun doing it.

Getting to know yourself and how your personality traits relate to people involved in various career opportunities is very important in your decision making process. During my many years in Human Resources and College Recruiting, I ran across too many students who had skipped this very important step and ended up in a job situation which for which they were not well suited. Selecting a career area is like buying a pair of shoes. First you have to be properly fitted for the correct size, and then you need to try on and walk in the various shoe options to determine which is fits the best and is most comfortable for you to wear. Following are some important steps which I developed during my career which have been helpful to many .

Ken recommends the following next steps:

The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
The first step is to take an interest and aptitude test and have it interpreted by your school counselor to see if you share the personality traits necessary to enter the field. You might want to do this again upon entry into college, as the interpretation might differ slightly due to the course offering of the school. However, do not wait until entering college, as the information from the test will help to determine the courses that you take in high school. Too many students, due to poor planning, end up paying for courses in college which they could have taken for free in high school.
Locate and attend meetings of professional associations to which people who are doing what you think that you want to do belong, so that you can get their advice. These associations may offer or know of intern, coop, shadowing, and scholarship opportunities. These associations are the means whereby the professionals keep abreast of their career area following college and advance in their career. You can locate them by asking your school academic advisor, favorite teachers, and the reference librarian at your local library. Here are some tips: ## https://www.careeronestop.org/BusinessCenter/Toolkit/find-professional-associations.aspx?&frd=true ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/9-tips-for-navigating-your-first-networking-event ##
• It is very important to express your appreciation to those who help you along the way to be able to continue to receive helpful information and to create important networking contacts along the way. Here are some good tips: ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/the-informational-interview-thank-you-note-smart-people-know-to-send?ref=recently-published-2 ## ## https://www.themuse.com/advice/3-tips-for-writing-a-thank-you-note-thatll-make-you-look-like-the-best-candidate-alive?bsft_eid=7e230cba-a92f-4ec7-8ca3-2f50c8fc9c3c&bsft_pid=d08b95c2-bc8f-4eae-8618-d0826841a284&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=daily_20171020&utm_source=blueshift&utm_content=daily_20171020&bsft_clkid=edfe52ae-9e40-4d90-8e6a-e0bb76116570&bsft_uid=54658fa1-0090-41fd-b88c-20a86c513a6c&bsft_mid=214115cb-cca2-4aec-aa86-92a31d371185&bsft_pp=2 ##
Here are some good tips on creating a good balance in college: ## https://www.unigo.com/in-college/college-experience/creating-a-workschool-balance-a-college-student-perspective ## ## http://www.mycollegesuccessstory.com/academic-success-tools/college-life-balance.html ## ## http://www.collegeconfidential.com/dean/000241/ ##
1
1
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Kim’s Answer

Joy,

That is an awfully broad question! Are you talking academically, socially, financially, being away from home, or the overall stress?


Basically, you will survive it the same way you have survived everything else so far. You will talk about it with friends and family, make to-do lists, analyze and re-analyze situations, and make decisions. They might not be the right decisions, but, at least you will make a decision and move on with life, because stressing over what to do has never worked in the past and it won't work now!


The key is to get as much credible information as possible to guide you in making these decisions. Asking another 19 year old how to manage money may not be the best way to go. (Although I imagine there are a few who have figured it out!). Find reliable on-line resources, talk to counselors, etc. Time management and money management will be key.


Also, figure out what type of studying works best for you, and when your body is most alert. Don't take 8 a.m . classes if your brain doesn't wake up until 10:30! Make good use of your time between classes to study, so you can keep your evenings and weekends as free as possible for social activities and/or working. I liked having at least a two-class break between classes, to give me time to grab a bite to eat plus do some reading or studying. So, if I had two classes from 9-11, I would not schedule another class until 1 or 2.


Get contact information for other people in your classes, figure out who takes good notes so you can borrow them if you miss a class, and do what you can to help others out as well. As to test preparation, I recommend asking the professors on the first day where they draw their test material from. Some like to assign tons of reading, but test totally over the lectures. While you should keep up with reading assignments, you don't want to waste time reviewing them for the test! Oh, and that is the other thing. Whatever you do, do not fall behind! Do readings prior to class, and the lectures will make more sense. Take your own notes - don't rely on what the professor posts on-line, as it may not make sense to you without your own explanations added to it.


Financially, make a budget, and stick to it. Allow yourself some going out money, but don't go overboard with it! Find inexpensive things to attend. Check out on-campus music and theatrical performances, for example. The same goes for meals. Find the best deal. Do some cooking.


Bottom line: yes, you will make it!

1
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Simi’s Answer

Get Organized: Making a plan for what you're going to do and when you're going to do it will make sure you're always ahead of the curve - literally.
Divide it up. Studying isn't fun, to begin with, and forcing yourself through a study marathon will only make it worse. Dividing your work into manageable chunks and rewarding yourself when you finish each chunk will make studying (more) fun.
Make good and focussed friends
Take part in Extracurricular activities. Don't hesitate to showcase your talents
Set a schedule. Do you work better right after school or after you've eaten dinner? Are you more productive in 90-minute blocks or half-hour spurts? Find a schedule that works for you, and stick to it.
Take notes. Taking notes will not only keep you more engaged during class but will also help you narrow down what you need to study when exam time rolls around. It's much easier to reread your notes than to reread your entire textbook!
Focussed and smart Study. This one might be obvious, but did you know that there's a right and a wrong way to study? Review your material several days ahead of time, in small chunks, and in different manners (for example, write flashcards one day and take practise tests the next). In other words, don't cram.
Find a study group. Sitting down with a group of people who are learning the same things as you are a great way to go over confusing class material or prepare for a big test. You can quiz each other, reteach material, and make sure that everyone is on the same page. After all, teaching someone else is the best way to learn.
Ask questions. don't be afraid to do just that! Asking for help - from a teacher, a tutor or your friends - is a surefire way to make sure you truly understand the material.
0