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How important is taking non-science based classes for a future in medicine?

I read that medical schools look for students that take classes that stand out from the usual classes that med school applicants take. How accurate is this? #medical-school #medicine

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Hwal’s Answer

Sapha,


I can think of many reasons to take non-science classes, most of all because they can be so much fun! Will it make you stand out? Will it make you more competitive? Both might well be true, but it might be best to think about what subjects and classes you enjoy most. For example, if you really want to take theatre and ethics but you're having second thoughts because you don't feel they're "science" enough, keep in mind that you can be just as competitive and strong with any undergraduate major as long as you take prerequisites classes.


Personally though, I think it's very important to expose myself to a variety of fields, subjects, and classes because even the practice of medicine is not all about science. I hope this helps.


Good luck!


Hwal

Thank you comment icon I agree, and I think its tremendously valuable it broadens your perspective and view of the world and that will allow you to better serve your patients has a physician. Practicing medicine is not just about medicine, but also serving your patients. Kelly Thomas
Thank you comment icon Yes, couldn't agree more, and having these 'non-science' classes under my belt could help set myself apart from my 'competitors' by showing the selection committees how 'well-rounded' a candidate I am. Hwal Lee
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Estelle’s Answer

You will get plenty of science classes fulfilling medical school requirements and requirements for fulfilling your degree plan. Therefore, your major is not as important as your undergraduate grades, your MCAT score, your letters of reference, and your personal statements on your optometry school application. For now, just focus on finding a college that fits you and your budget and a major that really interests you in college so that you will make great grades and get strong letters of recommendation from professors that recognize your potential.
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Kristine’s Answer

I think it may give you an advantage, as mentioned above if you took classes on ethics that could apply to so many other areas of a medical practice. Business classes could help with clinic management. It shows you are well rounded andable to branch out in other areas, not just in where your passions lie.
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Kelly’s Answer

I agree, and I think its tremendously valuable it broadens your perspective and view of the world and that will allow you to better serve your patients has a physician. Practicing medicine is not just about medicine, but also serving your patients.
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