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I truly and honestly believe going to medical school will be worth the journey, but I am afraid it will give me a little bit more stress that I can bare, so does anyone have any advice on how to manage when I reach that point in life?

I am asking because I desire to eitber be a psychiatrist or physician in the future, but I have heard about people who have went as far as to end their life because of medical school, and I never want to reach that point in my life. Thank you for your response in advancr and may Jesus do great things in your life. 😊😊

#medicalschool #medicine #medical-school #college

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Subject: Career question for you

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James Constantine’s Answer

Hey there, Chelsea!

I totally get that the thought of the stress and mental health hurdles that come along with chasing a dream in medicine can be daunting, especially during the intense training phase in med school. Yes, the road to becoming a psychiatrist or doctor is tough, but don't worry, there's an array of tactics and tools out there to help you handle stress and look after your mental health.

First things first, it's super important to create a solid circle of support. Having friends, family, mentors, and classmates who get what med school is like can give you priceless emotional backing. Plus, reaching out to counseling or therapy services can provide a confidential environment to work through stress and learn ways to deal with it.

Being smart with your time is another key part of handling the pressures of med school. By building effective study routines, setting achievable targets, and making time for self-care activities like exercise, hobbies, and downtime, you can strike a healthy balance between work and life.

Also, keeping an open line of communication with your professors, advisors, and classmates can be a real help. If you're feeling swamped, it's crucial to ask for help instead of suffering quietly. A lot of med schools offer mental health tools and support services that are designed to meet the specific needs of their students.

Lastly, keeping in touch with your reasons and enthusiasm for chasing a career in medicine can act as a beacon of hope during tough times. Remembering the difference you're aiming to make in patients' and communities' lives can give you a sense of purpose and strength.

So, to sum it up, while the journey to becoming a psychiatrist or doctor can bring big challenges, there are plenty of ways to handle stress and put your mental health first throughout med school and beyond.

Top 3 Authoritative Reference Publications or Domain Names Used in Answering this Question:

American Medical Association (ama-assn.org)
Mayo Clinic (mayoclinic.org)
National Alliance on Mental Illness (nami.org)

See my BIO for Nutrition Information
to power through stressful situations.

Take care,
James.
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Rachel’s Answer

In order to manage stress you have to manage your time wisely. <span style="background-color: transparent;">You have to set a routine for yourself and stick to it for the most part. Once you get into the groove of a routine it will be much easier for you to manage your time and have enough time for everything you need to do (including relaxing). Make yourself to-do lists on a weekly basis, use Google calendar or a planner to keep track of events, deadlines, and due dates. In addition to setting a routine and sticking to it, plan out relaxing activities into your day. Or set aside a time, after everything is done for the day, that you can have "me" time. I have also personally found it essential to not only find time for myself but also make use of that time in a way that is best for me and my holistic wellness. I have found the HeadSpace app to be an essential tool in helping me relax and generally feel more relaxed throughout the day, Guided meditation, even if you have a busy schedule, will make you feel more at ease and relaxed throughout the day as a whole (not just when you have the time to relax and focus on that "me" time).</span>

<span style="background-color: transparent;">Set a routine.Use Google Calendar.Set aside Me TimeWrite weekly to-do lists and use a planner.Find a peaceful and restful activity that will help you feel relaxed.</span>



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Rachel’s Answer

Do the things that allow you to maintain a healthy perspective on life. If you like to run, try to jog regularly to stay healthy. Volunteering can often help to get students out of their study bubble and show them that others have much greater problems than the score on their next test. Many people are heavily involved in church groups and community outreach.
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Richard’s Answer

Time management is key. Between lecture, lab and studying, the first 2 years will be grueling. Make sure to leave time for yourself to exercise, eat right and even some socializing.

There will be times during 3rd and 4th year when you will be frustrated by your continued lack of skills and knowledge but just remember that there will be plenty of time to master your specialty during residency.
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Sumer’s Answer

You should be so proud of yourself for even setting the goal and believing in yourself. I deal a lot with stress in my life and it can come from anywhere. From my experience it comes from anything around you, work, school, friends, family, the list honestly goes on. How to manage it honestly depends on what else is going on around you. It took me a few months to know what worked and what didn't, it all is an experiment to find what helps you with stress as each person handles stress differently. What I found that helps me is: I do yoga/exercise or take a long walk in a local park. I have also tried reading inspirational books that help lift my spirits, drinking calming teas help if you like tea. Even reaching out to a friend or family member to just talk or even hang out. All these help with stress. Remember stress is a part of life but its those moments that teach you who you truly are. Good luck and keep believing in yourself!

Sumer recommends the following next steps:

Find a local park.
Find an Inspirational Book
Reach out to a friend or family member
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