2 answers

My current plan is to go to a one year film college to get a certificate in screenwriting. Many people have mentioned that you really don't need a film degree to get into film, so a certificate is fine. Is this true?

2
100% of 2 Pros
Asked Viewed 207 times
2
100% of 2 Pros

2 answers

Scott’s Answer

0
Updated

Careers in writing have one of the lowest employment ratings after college and non-certified colleges can be worth less than you spend on them. ITT Technical Institute is a great example of certifications that did not pay off. ITT promised individuals careers in technical fields without the hard work of a four year college. These individuals left college with debt and were not any more employable than prior to college.


Look for an accredited university or college to know that the program you are paying for is worth the money you are spending. The playwright and screenwriting courses I attended in college left me with skills that will always be relevant to the industry. Formatting, proofing, copyrighting, and more are all skills that you need if you want a career in screenwriting.


With all of that said, if you love to write then write. IMDBpro offers insights into film jobs and internships in your area. Signing up for a small fee a month, taking on an internship with a film writer, and learning the ropes may be a better investment than college if you have a high aptitude of writing knowledge.

Scott recommends the following next steps:

  • Consider only accredited universities or colleges.
  • Research and talk to professors about programs at these institutions.
  • If college does not seem like the right fit for you, search for an internship in the field.
  • Evaluate and discuss these options with people in the field of your desired position.
  • Send a tweet to your favorite screenwriter. You never know the answers you might find from someone with a proven track record in the field.
0

Paul’s Answer

0
Updated
The most powerful combination you can have is a combination of formal education and experience. In other words, go to an accredited school (preferably in or near a market town like LA, New York, etc), and get any experience you can in the field. Every job you EVER HAVE from now on should be in or around this industry.

The other side effect of that experience? You meet people. Networking is easily one of the most important things you can build (assuming you have the talent, of course). Work hard, work everywhere you can, and be the kind of person people don't forget.

Good luck!
0