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How Can I Get More Scholarships With a Mediocre GPA?

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Honestly through high school I have been very lazy and it took me until the end of last year to get off my feet. I then got a 3.5 GPA in the last trimester. My cumulative GPA is 2.8 and I still want to go to college and I need financial help. I am paying for college on my own. #financial-help #college-admissions #scholarship #college

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Amit’s Answer

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Hi Nicholas,

Although GPA is usually an important factor in many scholarships, it is not the only factor. In fact there are many scholarships for practically anything you can think of, including type of field you want to major in, first generation college student, athlete, community service, etc. The main thing is that you want to apply for as many as you can, you would be surprised to see how many scholarships go unclaimed because there aren’t enough applications.


You want to first start with the counselor at your high schools. Local firms usually have scholarships that targeted for the local high schools.


I know the next step will sound obvious, but just google “scholarships”, all that you will have to do is write essays answering prompts for most of these. It will be worth your time.

Fill out the FAFSA form for financial aid, it does not take long and who knows what type of free aid you can end up with.


If you have already graduated from high school/ in college, speak with the financial aid office to see if there are any grants or scholarships you can qualify for. In addition, you can usually obtain “work study” which allows you to obtain a job on campus to make tax free earnings up to a certain amount. College campuses have many jobs that are tailored for students, so it is a good place to look for.

Best wishes,

Amit

Amit recommends the following next steps:

  • Speak with high school counselor about local scholarships.
  • Research scholarships/fill out FAFSA.
  • Speak with financial aid office in college.
  • Work study (working while in college).
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Ken’s Answer

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Following the process in my answer to your other question, you will be able to get information about scholarships from people who are involved in your intended career area, which is the most beneficial source of scholarships. However, when a person is getting a low GPA, based upon my past experiences, I am concerned about the suitability of your current career path to an appropriate application of your personality traits. The information and aptitude testing and its interpretation should shed some light on this along with a conversation with your academic adviser. If it proves that you are on the proper career track, your academic adviser and your teachers may be able to suggest improvements to your study habits, which might be more specifically related to succeeding in individual courses, as each may have a specific study method which is most helpful to that area.

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