5 answers

What are some things I can be doing to build up my resume for an internship in the film industry?

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100% of 4 Pros

5 answers

Sherie’s Answer

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1. While in school begin working on independent films and projects and use those experiences and your experience on your resume. Just because you don't get paid or it, you created the project yourself, and it is not a project with a film company, does not mean that your projects are not REAL work. They are, so use those experiences to create a resume.

2. Network and look into opportunities to volunteer on film shoots. You can find projects online on all the job sites as well as your school's film department would have those opportunities. Use those experiences to add onto your resume to get that film internship.

3. Network and see if your friends and family know anyone who already works in the film industry and meet with them to see if they could get you and opportunity to work on a film set. You would be surprised what networking can do. It will also build up your resume.

All of the above options would give you experience and help you stand out on your resume and get that internship. all the best in your career.
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Sherie’s Answer

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Updated Translate
1. While in school begin working on independent films and projects and use those experiences and your experience on your resume. Just because you don't get paid or it, you created the project yourself, and it is not a project with a film company, does not mean that your projects are not REAL work. They are, so use those experiences to create a resume.

2. Network and look into opportunities to volunteer on film shoots. You can find projects online on all the job sites as well as your school's film department would have those opportunities. Use those experiences to add onto your resume to get that film internship.

3. Network and see if your friends and family know anyone who already works in the film industry and meet with them to see if they could get you and opportunity to work on a film set. You would be surprised what networking can do. It will also build up your resume.

All of the above options would give you experience and help you stand out on your resume and get that internship. all the best in your career.
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Robert’s Answer

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Hi, the film industry can be very exciting, and it holds many positions that can range from finance to physical production and even digital marketing. If you have a general idea of what area you want to enter, then it makes it easier to try to design a path toward that environment. My answer is for someone that is not sure what area they want to enter but can apply to anyone interested in getting some experience.

Some of the things you can be doing to build up your resume are networking. Most career opportunities happen through someone you know, that is not to say it’s impossible any other way, but it helps. Consider attending/volunteering at film festivals, local talks or movie screenings for independent films, etc. Depending on your city, you have various types of activities. Becoming active in online forums can also be helpful if you have a skill like say design, social media knowledge, music, you may find other like mind individuals that may benefit from your knowledge.


Another thing you can do to build up your resume is getting involved in some activities at your school, church, youth center, etc. and volunteer if they have any audio-visual needs, filming an event, taking photographs, posting to their social channels, starting their social channels, etc. This experience may seem like not a big deal, but it is a start to add things to your resume and build some recommendations you can share for internships.


Look up online at any company you would like to get an internship and apply. While many of the larger studios may be highly competitive, you can find independent productions that need reliable people that can make themselves available. I’ve used interns as Productions Assistants and many gain valuable experience due to our production budget being so small. You get to wear many hats and you gain experience to place on your resume.


You asking a question like this is a great way of putting yourself out there. Now through social media, you can communicate with people directly through DM, email, etc. Be kind, be respectful, but don’t be shy of asking people this question directly and you may be pleasantly surprised at how many respond.

There is no perfect way to get experience, but, don’t take for granted things you may have done in school or even for family. I’ve had interns that recorded and edited a friends party and I recommended they use that as part of their reel. Hope some of this helps and best of luck on your journey!


Some next steps:

-Create a Linkedin Profile https://www.linkedin.com/

-Create or update your resume

https://www.resume.com/careers/resume-writing/8-things-put-resume-no-experience-teens/

https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/resumes-cover-letters/writing-a-resume-with-no-experience

-Be mindful of what you post on social media. When researching candidates, I have known many employers that will search social media to get a general idea of the candidate. There have been times where people were not considered due to the content on their social media feeds.

Robert recommends the following next steps:

  • Create a LinkedIn profile
  • Create or update your resume
  • Clean up, if necessary, any inappropriate content on your social media accounts
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Jeff’s Answer

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Yes, you can add any thing you had done in past experience for those jobs.

That way it helps big different.

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Richard’s Answer

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If you have a criminal background, forget Pyrotechnics...
Seriously... Im pretty sure you know most of this stuff.
start with a camera. OK... which side of that thing do you, ehem... picture yourself ?
Either way the industry kinda depends on "suspending disbelief" which is a fancy way of saying "draw their attention" . Everyone from actor to stage hand shares a single unified vision and then plays their own role in achieving that vision. Your resume should reflect that your committed to that theme.
If you want to act... im the last person to advise... I cant even convince my landlord why the rent is late.
But everyone does well if they start with the concept of storytelling and then learns what they want to do to compel an audience... so everyone should demonstrate that they know scripts, the process of film-making, the way scenes break down, how the whole thing works. It all pretty much the same procedure as it was 75 years ago. SO study that a little. Showing you know how its done always looks good!
Mention relevant classwork... like American literature or themes in Hitchcock, or whatever... show you wanted to do this stuff right from the beginning. That will impress.
I see your in Malibu ( or as Alan Harper puts it... "The Boo" ... ) Your in the right metro area for film making, so I would start behind the camera with PA (Production Assistant) perhaps unpaid to start then paid. You have to work hard but you can get those and that's pretty much the entry level. I hate the word "setiquette" but demonstrating you know how to contribute when the filming is underway is a real plus... that takes set time!
Now pick up a camera... one with some control ( forget auto-focus and stuff like that! ) try to tell a story with one picture! Figure out the parameters.. learn why actors MUST hit their "marks" and why lights and shadows are so important to do right. Everyone needs to know that stuff... so showing some understanding of staging and cameras never hurts!
THEN start a scene, Then a commercial or something... your not going to do "driving miss daisy" before "my puppie thinks he's human" ... if ya know what I mean. Its going to evolve.
Did I mention learning the process? ... oh Yea.. I did.. well Ditto you cant overdo that one...
Do some crew time . Now operation the camera is "the line" so to speak... do you want to write/direct etc then your "above" run cameras? "On the line", grip and light? (crew) "below the line"...
Understand editing and effects if that's a way you want to go. ( IDK... I guess that's "beside the line?" ) . Its real important to mention that you know some software that's basically trade specific... Find some work "rotoscoping" just to build your network and get time on that software stuff. It sucks but saying "familiar with flame" really really looks good, even if you just learned how to boot it and open a file!
Next write a little, study some of the greats and ask yourself what they have in common. Look at the flops and see where the failures are... Get back to that "suspending disbelief" thang.
Ok.. some more education works well... a masters in film is great if you want to be "above the line" , some folklore and storytelling background looks great on a resume, NOBODY is going to let you get 50 feet from a $450,000 film camera without some training! Go to Panavision and have them advise on how to use their stuff! Its really good to see the real cameras and get an idea how they work no matter what you do! Camera folks usually went to Gphomestay (brooks institute) or some photography training awhile back ... it boosts the creative skills and is great for some supplement to your resume. Crew work is really networking and apprenticeship. Speaking first hand...You don't want to turn on a stage light unless someone taught you! Every gig I got in my 20 years in entertainment came from my network... so put them just below your baby niece on you Christmas list!
After some time, make yourself a "demo reel" .. 30 seconds is ideal. doesn't have to be fantastic. If you have one your doing well.
Ok... day 2... just kidding...
Just start hanging around and reading about folks that succeeded in what you want to specialize in then look at their resume... do what they did! Restrict social media and only put industry folks on your linked in... think "can they advance my craft or get me gigs? " before you invite or except friends. having a few real pros in a network is far better than a hundred wannabees.
Dont watch "swimming with sharks" ... just dont.
https://www.myperfectresume.com/how-to/entertainment has some good samples to kinda guide ya!
And remember... when interviewing... they will decide if they want you in 30 seconds the rest of the time is talking yourself out of the gig... so be precise, and dont elaborate too much...
Hope that helps!
Richard "remember me at the Oscars" Wolf

BTW ... that thing behind me in my profile picture is the miniature model of a aircraft carrier con-tower we blew up on "Sum of All Fears. " I got banned from a sound-stage for that one...
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