Skip to main content
7 answers
6
Asked 549 views

I would like to work in tech but I am not very good at maths

Hi,

I am a student and I am not very good in maths. I am very interested in technology, love being on my phone but not that good in maths. I don't think I would be a very good sales person either. What are the other jobs possible then?
#technology #engineering #career
Thanks,
Nic

+25 Karma if successful
From: You
To: Friend
Subject: Career question for you

6

7 answers


0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Faraz’s Answer

Hi Nic, there are a lot of roles that don't require you be great at Math in tech. These span from recruiting, to design, to product, to project management etc. If you go to a tech company's career pages, you'll see roles like these among others that don't require math.

Focus more on the types of problems you'd like to solve and which industries you'd like to be a part of. Creativity in how you approach solving problems, curiosity in what you want to learn, and passion for what you want to do are far more important than whether you have math skills or not.
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Luis Carlos’s Answer

Hi Nic,


Dont worry. Not loving math is not the problem. Tech is basically the way in which we solve problems. Remember, that there are many parts of tech as illustrator, programer, designer, project manager and many more. I am from a small village in Honduras and tech was not an option. So I had to move to the industrial city in order to study tech,


Greetings,

Luis

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Su’s Answer

Hi Nic,

In my experience very good at maths are not necessary. Logic thinking is more important for daily job in tech industries.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Affan’s Answer

Hi Nic,

Being great at maths should not be a hinderance to what you want to acheive.

I believe a university education instills a way of thinking, if you decide to opt for technical sciences, its usually a logical way of thinking.

While maths is required, it is not compulsory to have a great career in tech.

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

John’s Answer

If you're not into sales, you can still be in a sales enablement role, ie. train the sales team on products & services available in the company, and and your performance is measured accordingly to how well the sales do in their roles

If you're not into math, that's not a blocker too. Many roles in tech esp. front-line customer/supplier-facing don't require heavy-duty math.

You get the flow?

John recommends the following next steps:

Understand your own personality strengths; leverage those strengths instead
Know what roles are available in the market for Tech; search the job markets of your favourite tech companies. Filter down to 2-3 roles you think fits your personality, and work towards that goal
0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

Alejandra’s Answer

Nic,

Math should not be a stopper. Try to identify which strengths you have that could fit in the tech field. I work in the Tech industry as a people manager. I have been around for almost 8 years and I barely use complex math (Excel does it all LOL) . Ask yourself what is what you like about technology and then identify from your strengths what could fit on it. I'll be glad to continue the conversation with you if you will.

Best,

0
0
Updated
Share a link to this answer
Share a link to this answer

G. Mark’s Answer

First off, Einstein reportedly had trouble with arithmetic and said so in a letter to a young fan as well. Second, there are a wide variety of types of mathematics. You may find, like Einstein, that there are some areas you find that you perform quite well in. Third, I personally used math much more in my schooling than in my various jobs. Some parts of mathematics are theoretical, some a conceptual, some deal with geometry, some, like finite mathematics, rely on logic. And sometimes, you just need to have an idea of what you want to achieve and then enlist others or possibly computer programs to do the calculations.


In one of my particular jobs, I was involved in tech, but it was in computer systems architecture. While it was math-related, it was mostly conceptual and logical. The few times I actually used mathematics itself, I could have easily simply asked someone to do it for me.


Some technical jobs strictly require very little math. But if you like those particular areas, you probably will have little trouble grasping the mathematics of the related principles. An example I often use with students is auto mechanics. This field is filled with mathematics. But if you ask a technician if he felt he was "doing math", he'd likely say no. Even though that field is extremely technical. The same could be said for baseball. Most players don't consider themselves "technicians" or "mathematicians", but they most certainly use technology and mathematics all the time without thinking about it.

0