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#Is college worth it?

I'm not so sure about going to college #college-advice

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Tracy’s Answer

Great question! I think I'm a bit biased because I think the answer is absolutely yes. I had an amazing experience in college and it really helped me to mature and learn. It was more than the education that I gained, I gained a "crew" of friends and mentors that I still have to this day. I was on my own for the first time in a safe space. Your college experience will depend on what you put into it. But, also, I know a lot of people who didn't go to college and also have amazing careers. At the end of the day, I think having a degree gives you a leg up in many, but certainly not all circumstances. You'll have to choose what is best for you. Whatever you decide, don't let anything stand in your way. There will be difficult times, but just keep working hard, seek help when you need it, and you'll be successful. Best of luck!

Tracy recommends the following next steps:

Talk to people in the career that your interested in and find out whether or not they went to college. You may find people on both sides -- listen to advice but decide what is best for you.
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Calvin’s Answer

College is an investment in yourself and opportunity to grow as a person and find out more of what you want to do. College will open many doors for you that you couldn't access with out, but just like most things in life, you get out of it what you put into it. The more you work you put into it while you're there (being involved in different clubs, academic societies, etc.), the more "worth it" it'll be. I know people who have gone to college and just went through the motions, skipped class, etc. and for those people it probably wasn't as worth it as it could have been. I was able to get involved in a number of clubs and had a super fun time while also growing as a person as a result.

For many people it can obviously seem too expensive, and it's true that student loans can pose financial troubles for some. However, many people take the community college route and save money for their first two years or so before going to a four-year, which is a great option. Also, there are many opportunities for scholarships, etc. that can make it more affordable. I took on student loans myself and with the lower rate of interest they have and the long amount of time you have to pay them off, I have found them to not harm my quality of living as I pay them off.

Ultimately, college is worth it for most people. According to the College Board, the price of college will pay for itself in 12 years with the expanded opportunities you will have as a result. The more you put into it, the more worth it college will be.

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Lindsy’s Answer

Funny, I just had this discussion with some friends (all of whom went to college.) As someone who doesn’t work in the field in which she studied (I was a chemist, but now a product manager in tech,) I still 100% believe that college is worth it. There a great deal of personal aspects to this which I think we often overlook. It is really the first time in many of us had to “adult,” be responsible for keeping a schedule, make tough decisions about our paths, trust ourselves to complete tasks, and feel a true sense of achievement at finishing a degree. I am constantly surprised how often I think about what a feat it was, and feeling proud that I pursued both college and grad school.

There are probably some caveats, like if you have a lot of professional experiences or life experiences that can translate to a job that you’ll love, then going back to college may not be necessary.

I think the main thing to remember is that there isn’t a perfect order of life operations. You might want to start by just getting the standard pre requisite classes out of the way, but take a break to work or travel. You might find a job that will train you AND pay for you to complete a degree. You might get a degree and find out you want to do something wildly different. Don’t be afraid to pick your path. Education is a great tool and springboard. You’ll feel more confident in your abilities as will future employers.

My one final piece of advice is to really look into the school, try to talk to professors in your ideal field, locate a mentor. They’re out there, and finding a great spot makes all the difference!

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Nathan’s Answer

This is a question that a lot of people are trying to answer, and there is no definitive answer.

Maybe, maybe not.

If your goal is a life education, most any college degree could worth it. If you really don't know what to do with your life and you just pick a major that is easy, or pick a major that doesn't have good job prospects, then it might not be worth the time and money.

A college degree doesn't guarantee you a job.

I know people who got degrees in some areas and couldn't find jobs. Others got degrees in technology areas and had multiple job offers.

Many careers don't need degrees.

It's could really be worth it you are going into engineering, computer science, medical fields, accounting, finance, etc.

It could be worth it if you have a scholarship or have someone else paying for it. :-)


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Udayini’s Answer

It depends.

For some professions (like, if you want to be a doctor or a lawyer), your education credentials are important.

For other professions (like, if you want to be a software developer), people learn their craft, sometimes without college.

I would encourage you to think of the following benefits of a college education that sometimes don't get talked about -

  • A college education can provide well-rounded growth. For example, no matter what the major, I would encourage classes in liberal arts.
  • A college education can provide opportunities to engage in extracurriculars (for example, clubs are such an avenue where people get together to work on things that may not be directly related to their major. Think "Speech and debate", "Business incubator" type clubs. Yet, they provide invaluable skills and sometimes may better guide you towards what fulfills you).

So, my $0.02 is to at least consider it.


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Shawn’s Answer

My thoughts are that it depends on what type of work you would like to do. There are many great professions which do not require college but do require trade school, or an apprenticeship program of some kind. Professions such as electrician, plumbers, and mechanics are careers with a different learning path.

Whether you choose college or not, you should expect to spend time learning for any career. These skills can be learned in different ways from self study for software development, or specialized trade schools for things like airplane repair.

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