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Any advice for a upcoming college freshman?

I will be attending Old Dominion University majoring in Cytotechnology #college #college-advice


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John’s Answer

Remember Jowell, you need to remember a college education is an investment in yourself. Your investment of time and money hopefully gets you that fulfilling career that allows you to live a life unburdened by debt.

INVEST IN YOURSELF WITH A COLLEGE EDUCATION

Most students are advised to treat their college education like finding a 'soul mate' and are told to look for a place where they'll be happy, Remember Jowell you need to think about choosing like any investment, some are better than others. A degree in basket weaving, Renaissance art or golf is likely to result in significantly lower earnings than a degree in information technology, business or the health sciences. Choosing your major wisely is a lot like selecting an appropriate investment for your long-term portfolio. In other words, you need to choose something that dovetails with your goals and has a realistic opportunity to provide the return on investment that you are anticipating.

FIND THE RIGHT COLLGE FOR YOUR INVESTMENT – Choosing a college is about more than the name on the diploma. Wherever you decide to go to school will touch numerous aspects of your life, from academic studies, social activities and beyond. Considering the importance of this decision, hopefully you, weighed the pros and cons in choosing this particular college, carefully consider your wants and needs and that this university was best to help you reach your investment in yourself in the next four years or longer.

INVESTMENTS ARE RISKEY – Every investment has risk, and a college education is no different. One of the greatest risks is that you extend your stay beyond four years (increases your initial cost) or don’t graduate at all (diminishes your return). This is another reason the college selection process was so important. To address these risks, my advise is you work with a college admissions professional who can help you determine where you might fit in best, select a major you will stick with and increase your odds of graduating on time.

SEE THE TRUE COST OF A UNIVERSITY – Of course, getting a degree is easier said than done. The cost of a college education is high, and it's only getting higher. In fact, the cost of education has risen faster than inflation over the past decade, and tuition at a four-year public university is estimated at $12,000 dollars per year for the 2020 – 2021 school year. Costs are also higher for students who live on campus. Because learning financial responsibility is just one of the many lessons that we all must face, choosing to commute rather than live on campus is a financially prudent decision that can save tens of thousands of dollars.

FOCUS ON YOU FUTURE – The focus on the cost of college is misplaced. While the cost of a single year, particularly at a private school, can be significant, most college graduates will earn back the amount spent in a single year of working. In some cases, such as graduates from public education institutions, their first year's salary will cover the cost of all four years in college. How would you like to invest $48,000 and have it turn into $4 million? Thousands of people do it. Their investment strategy involves a four-year commitment to education. The payoff begins with the receipt of a college degree, which opens the door to a lifetime of earnings that otherwise might not have been possible to obtain. In this article, we'll show you the million-dollar benefits of choosing to pursue an education.

Jowell the significant earnings that a college graduate can expect provide the opportunity to enjoy material comforts. A nice car, a nice home and some spending money in your pocket are the traditional rewards for financial success. Likewise, increased earnings provide an opportunity to save and invest. As a college graduate you'll have the opportunity to not only enjoy a comfortable lifestyle during your working years, but your increased earnings will provide the opportunity to save and invest to ensure a financially secure retirement.

Hope this was Helpful Jowell

John recommends the following next steps:

Think about which majors will be the most valuable 10 years from now.
Download the official curriculum for each major and talk to the professors each of those majors.
Interview upper-classmen who’ve taken those majors about the pros and cons.

Thank You Todd. If we want to touch the past, touch a rock. If we want to touch the present, touch a flower. If we want to touch the future, touch a life. John Frick

Thank You Joseph. “Remember that the happiest people are not those getting more, but those giving more.” ― H. Jackson Brown Jr. John Frick

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Kamesha’s Answer

Remember the reason why you’re attending college as there are a lot of distractions especially as a freshman. There are quite of few activities to be involved in on campus so I suggest finding something that peak your interests as a positive hobby. If you are attending close to home plan out visits to see loved ones.

Kamesha recommends the following next steps:

Research majors or career fields early

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Todd’s Answer

As a parent of an incoming college Freshman, I can tell you that this is a very bizarre time to transition to college. It's June and we still don't have clarity if college will be in-person, remote or a hybrid. Covid-19 has changed expectations and is keeping everyone guessing. While I don't know your particular situation (going to a local or distant college, dorming or commuting, etc.), you'll need to adjust to whatever your school determines to be the right course of action. Everyone at your school will be in the same situation, so any anxieties will be shared. I suggest that you start making connections with fellow classmates now, as there are groups forming via Facebook, Discord, Snapchat, etc. Not only can you meet potential roommates, but also students in your particular academic discipline. If you're planning on participating in extracurricular activities, there are communities for that as well.

Start exploring and connecting now and you'll be extra prepared for whatever college will be this Fall. Best of luck to you!

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Sacoyah’s Answer

First I want to say CONGRATULATIONS! College is an exciting time for you to get truly know yourself if you already don't.

College is very different from high school:

1. In high school you have back to back classes from 7:30am-2:30pm every day. In college you can have one class two times a week for a hour and a half each day or even one class only one day a week. You will find yourself with a lot of free time. I would say to get involved, there are many different organizations that you can join based on your interests, this will give you a support system of like minded individuals. Just don't make that your main priority, your education is your first priority. It is important to be social but at the same time do not let being social come into competition with your class work and studying because you are there first to gain an education. This can be a little confusing because I mentioned to get involved, you have to learn to create a balance of FUN and BUSINESS. The one skill that you will take with you as you become an adult.

2. You will not have your parents there to remind you about certain deadlines or due dates. My greatest advice is to get yourself a planner so you can mark important dates like when a paper is due or when you have a test. Even mark your social events and study times. It helps you practice time management.

3. This one is a little funny. Don't be tempted to gain the freshman 15. Fifteen lbs that is. Stay active, eat healthy and drink water. You know the things your parents tell you to do like, "eat your veggies." Believe me you'll thank me later.

5. Don't be afraid to ask for help. This can be from anywhere from:
a. Classwork - professors have office hours where you can ask questions. There are tutor available for each subject
b. Experiencing anxiety - there are student health centers that can help you get adjusted to college life. Don't be afraid to use these services. Mental health is important.
c. Selecting a major - You will be assigned a counselor. Get to know them, set up a meeting in the beginning of the semester to ask them questions about different careers in your major, best electives to take and so on.
d. Which organizations to join - There should be an Office of Student Life somewhere on campus. They will have a list of all the organizations located on campus. They are a great source to start on how to be social.

6. And most importantly HAVE FUN. College is about learning through experiences. Enjoy yourself, experiment with your individuality. Try to stay positive and take care of your mental health.

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Matthew’s Answer

My degree required me to take at least 2 writing courses. Remember that your professors are required by your school to have office hours where they have to answer any questions you may have.

Whenever I got an essay assignment, I would write my first draft, take it to the professor during their writing hours (and brought my laptop with the essay open) and I would make the changes the professor gave me in real time. That way, if I were to hand it in, they should have no reason NOT to give me an A on it.

College is a great time to learn how to work smarter, not harder :)

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Alexander’s Answer

Hi Jowell, I highly recommend exploring introductory classes. Take advantage of being a new student and try different courses to see what peaks your interest. Use your first year to really figure out what you want to do with your future, and it's OK if that takes more than the first year. I didn't set my major until the end of my sophomore year. I tried 4 different programs and I'm happy to say, I know I ended up at the right one!

I wish you luck!

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Mellie’s Answer

1. Get to know you advisor - they're a vital resource when it comes to your educational path. They're there to help you!

2. Introduce yourself to your professors - in person is ideal but even a simple email will do to make yourself stand out from everyone else. It may come in handy for that one-off time you need an extension on an assignment.

3. Be who ever you want to be and meet as many people as you can! Everyone is in the same boat freshman year and just trying to find their way.

Congratulations and have fun!



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Anne’s Answer

College is a wonderful time in life to learn, meet new people, and hone in on what you might want to do as a career. I recommend being open minded, and taking advantage of all in-person or on-line resources that your college may offer. Be open to learning about careers you may not have thought of, in addition to seeking out a mentor at the college who can help you through your journey. Good luck!

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Pace’s Answer

I thought I would provide a few thoughts that can help make a successful first year in college:

- Try to create some structure outside of your class schedule. You will have a lot more time in your day and putting in scheduled time to do your school work, workout, etc. will go a long way in your success. And limit the chances of doing major projects last minute.
- If you are not 100% sure of your major, consider taking some of your electives in another area of study. These can help round out your overall education as well as help you put your toe in the water in other areas that may be of interest.
- Always keep things in perspective! This is true throughout life but the first few weeks/months of college can be challenging for a lot of different reasons. Setbacks happen but don't let them consume you. Just try to use them as valuable learning experiences and building blocks for success.

Best of luck,
-Pace

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Devron’s Answer

1. Don’t worry so much.
There are lots of these pre-freshman-year lists, so many that it can seem like high school is a rickety bridge hung over lava, so treacherous that we must advise you on everything, lest you slip and become human fondue. (I watched Shrek yesterday. I’m also hungry.) But it’s not that. Relax. There are no dragons in high school.

2. High school is a game of inches.
But there are finals. Let me introduce you to your new least favorite number: 89. (So close, and yet so far away.) Come finals week, the difference between an A and a B might be less than half a percentage point. This 4th-and-goal scenario happens often. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

3. Play small ball.
Over a semester, small actions pile up. Always do the extra credit assignments. Always correct a test or essay when offered. And always dress up as Jay Gatsby or Sydney Carton or Gimley or whoever your teacher asks you to. Your grade will improve and, just as importantly, your teacher will see your effort and may “bump you up” at the end of the semester if you need it.

4. The French got something right.
There’s a concept in cooking called mise-en-place, basically French for “put in place.” Some chefs spend more time preparing their station than they do cooking. I find this inspiring and uber-applicable. (I’m also still hungry.) Find a way to organize your life that works for you. Always be preparing and prioritizing; use 10 minutes after a test or two hours before a practice. Don’t waste it. Chip away at homework now, and your future self will thank you when you want to watch Teen Wolf.

5. If conflicted between staying in and going out, choose the latter.
Your fondest high school memories won’t be made in your room. (At least the PG ones.) Go to the big game. Go to the big dance. Even go to the small hangout. Never turn down a chance to make a connection.

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Sebastian’s Answer

As a college student entering my senior year I can say that the best piece of advice I can give to incoming freshman is to get involved in some on campus organization. Getting involved whether it be in greek life, a club sports team, a honor society, etc... is a great way of getting to know other people which can be a struggle if you don't have many other friends going to that same school. Coming into college I only knew a few people from high school but I wasn't friends with them but joining a fraternity really helped me get integrated with the campus and get to know a lot of people. I would also say that making friends within your major is a great idea. I know from my experience it helps having a group of friends taking the same classes as you because you can share advice with one another or if you are having difficulty with an assignment they can always help explain it to you. Lastly, I would just say to just enjoy yourself. Go out and meet new people because later in college when classes get a lot harder you won't be able to go out as much, trust me. I know a lot of freshman get nervous about starting college because it's a whole new experience but don't worry because my friends and I all agree that our freshman year was our favorite year of college and within a heartbeat we would all go back in time to it.

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Nathan’s Answer

1) Keep your eye on the prize - Always have a goal in mind for your studies, whether that's another future degree, certain skillset, a particular job, etc.

2) Know and expect change - COVID-19 and these uncertain times have shown the world that we need to, "expect the unexpected." The more adaptable you are and ready for the curve balls life will inevitably be throwing your way, the better off you'll be overall.

3) Keep calm and carry on - Issues will arise throughout your time in college. Problems with coursework, relationships, friendships, money can seem like a heavy load and you may, one day, find yourself struggling to balance everything. Know that there's always someone out there to help and always a resource to help you carry on.

4) Concentrate on career - Whether you want to immediately apply your cytotechnological skills in a relevant position or continue on to pursue graduate and post-graduate studies, always keep the application of your studies in mind. Find job opportunities that interest you and work to gain those skills. Never stop thinking of ways to apply the knowledge that you're gaining.

5) Be yourself - This one is pretty self-explanatory :)

Best of luck with the upcoming college experience!

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nirma’s Answer

Please remember to choose a career that you can envision yourself in once you graduate.

1) Research the success rate of your degree, how easy it is to find/create employment, and be comfortable with the potential income. Try to form a plan to obtain employment or self-employment already while you are taking classes. A big mistake I see many doing is they wait to research/find employment until after they finish school, only to find that the opportunities are scarce. Try to know what you are getting into while in school to give yourself a chance with making the right decisions.

2) Please stay focused. Of course you can have some hiatus between classes to have fun, but try to finish what you began unless you find a better major to work on. It is easy to become distracted, so try to do your best with completing school if you really want the degree you are pursuing.

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Edward’s Answer

Congratulations on your High School graduation and for making a great decision to further your education by going on to college!

College is a fantastic experience. It will be far different than your high school days, but different in a very positive way. Honestly, the first several weeks can be stressful but don't get overly stressed or concerned. That feeling will soon pass! My advice would be relax, enjoy the full experience, go to your classes, give every class your full effort and get evolved! If you do those few things, you will be successful and you will have a great college experience.

I wish you all the best!

Ed

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Marie Ann Micah’s Answer

It wasn't too long ago when I first stepped in a university for my first day. Always remember that all your hard-work is slowly and surely paying off and that setting your foot in that university for the first time is just the early steps of a lifetime that will change your life for the better. Bring with you your confidence. Smile a lot and let loose. Being nervous is totally normal and instead of dodging people, make good use of that feeling to initiate conversation with fellow freshmen. You are entering a new stage of your life and it is best to have a piece of paper in your wallet of a little reminder in your phone of why you are doing what you're doing. This will help you do your best and keep going when life is tough.

Be prepared and read ahead of time. You do not need to be on top of your class, what's important is that you understand what is being taught. Pay attention to classes and always be on time. Be friends with the librarian, libraries are the best place to study. Focus on your studies but also do not forget that you are also gaining experience. The best experiences in life are best when shared. Make friends. Try your best to be nice to fellow students and to your professors.

It is also recommended for you to form habits and coping mechanism when college life gets stressful. Do not burn any bridges with your HS friends. You will need someone to talk to if it gets to hard in college. You can also try journaling or exercising as a way to relieve stress. Be mindful of balancing your time with friends, studies, families and to yourself.

Good luck and be excited because you are entering an awesome time of your life.

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Pace’s Answer

I thought I would provide a few thoughts that can help make a successful first year in college:

- Try to create some structure outside of your class schedule. You will have a lot more time in your day and putting in scheduled time to do your school work, workout, etc. will go a long way in your success. And limit the chances of doing major projects last minute.
- If you are not 100% sure of your major, consider taking some of your electives in another area of study. These can help round out your overall education as well as help you put your toe in the water in other areas that may be of interest.
- Always keep things in perspective! This is true throughout life but the first few weeks/months of college can be challenging for a lot of different reasons. Setbacks happen but don't let them consume you. Just try to use them as valuable learning experiences and building blocks for success.

Best of luck,
-Pace

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Jenny’s Answer

My advice as you enter college is to work hard, play hard. College is going to be an amazing social time in your life where you meet so many people, develop lasting friendships and experience so many things that you'll reflect on for a lifetime. With that though, remember that college isn't only about having fun--studying is important and setting yourself up for your future career is very important. Take the time to learn in class and from other students and mentors. Invest in internship opportunities, study abroad if you can and leverage advice from career counselors on campus and faculty advisors.

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Angela’s Answer

Be a sponge and take everything in! As a freshman, there's no pressure to know exactly what you want to do - rather this is a time to explore. My #1 tip would be to get involved in ANYTHING you have even the slightest bit of interest in. Get outside of your comfort zone - join things pertaining to your field of interest but also look into things you would never think to be involved in, as it's a good learning experience. This will help you decide what you want to be doing and if you want to explore something else. It will also connect you to people with the same interests as you; it may be scary to join something alone but you will definitely not regret it, as you'll make friends and possibly even future colleagues. Good luck!

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nirma’s Answer

Please remember to choose a career that you can envision yourself in once you graduate.

1) Research the success rate of your degree, how easy it is to find/create employment, and be comfortable with the potential income. Try to form a plan to obtain employment or self-employment already while you are taking classes. A big mistake I see many doing is they wait to research/find employment until after they finish school, only to find that the opportunities are scarce. Try to know what you are getting into while in school to give yourself a chance with making the right decisions.

2) Please stay focused. Of course you can have some hiatus between classes to have fun, but try to finish what you began unless you find a better major to work on. It is easy to become distracted, so try to do your best with completing school if you really want the degree you are pursuing.

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Denise’s Answer

As a mother of a student who just finished his freshman year of college it is definitely an adjustment for everyone of course you the student has the bigger adjustment ....A. being away from home. B. Living on your own having to do things for yourself and having to experience a whole new world of independence.
One of the biggest things is not be a hermit, don't stay stuck in your dorm (if living on campus) attend group meetings and get involved on campus as much as you can this can be done even if not on campus. Not saying partying, I am saying getting involved in different groups helps you meet new people and learn about ways of doing things while away at school and learning things about the school.
This helped my son very much and even with his workload he was able to get a small job on campus working 20 hours a week and will be maintaining that same job when he returns this fall for his sophmore year.
I hope this helps a little and wishing you all the best in your college future and beyond.

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Ricardo’s Answer

Hi Jowell,

Here a few pieces of advice to help you start your college career:

1) Remember that grades come first, so pick classes that you enjoy. Your first year is the prime time to start to explore different areas of study you are interested in and elective classes are the best windows into those fields.
2) Join student clubs. I understand with Covid-19 that this would put you in a unique circumstance. Still try to find out if there are virtual club fairs and talk to the students that are running it. This is a great place to meet peers and create friendships that will support you through your college experience.
3) Make a routine. With college you are going to have a lot freedom, which is a double-edge sword. Remember no one will remind you about to do your homework, do your laundry, or even get some sleep. I say the best thing that got me use to college was when I got a normal sleep schedule, instead of sleeping the weekends away and being a "zombie" during my morning classes. Once you get sleep mastered, you be surprised how much starts to fall into place!

Best of luck to you,
Ricardo

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Alexis’s Answer

So in today's "new normal", if you are able to go off to college in August I suggest to all new freshman to be apart of everything campus has to offer. Don't sit in your room after class. Go to the gym, join Greek life, get a little part time job, stay active! And I think its important to not go home every weekend. That's one thing I just didn't get about people going home every single weekend. The weekends are what you look forward to in college. But also, don't be dumb. Go to class! Your parents are spending all this money on school, don't squander the opportunity as well. College is the best time of your life. This is where you really figure out who you are as a person, and who your real friends are. I loved every part of my college experience at Western Kentucky University.

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Edward’s Answer

Congratulations on your High School graduation and for making a great decision to further your education by going on to college!

College is a fantastic experience. It will be far different than your high school days, but different in a very positive way. Honestly, the first several weeks can be stressful but don't get overly stressed or concerned. That feeling will soon pass! My advice would be relax, enjoy the full experience, go to your classes, give every class your full effort and get evolved! If you do those few things, you will be successful and you will have a great college experience.

I wish you all the best!

Ed

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Matthew’s Answer

My degree required me to take at least 2 writing courses. Remember that your professors are required by your school to have office hours where they have to answer any questions you may have.

Whenever I got an essay assignment, I would write my first draft, take it to the professor during their office hours (and brought my laptop with the essay open) and I would make the changes the professor gave me in real time. That way, if I were to hand it in, they should have no reason NOT to give me an A on it.

College is a great time to learn how to work smarter, not harder :)

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Brian’s Answer

Congratulations!!! Exciting times!

Two tips that might seem contradictory.

1. Enjoy the moment- college is a special time when you are connecting with so many new people at once. As we watched our sons go through the experience, they made friends and gained a world of experience in those years. Every once in a while, make sure you are engaged in something at the school that really interests you and might not be directly tied to your major.

2. Stay the course on your study habits. Some folks are naturally better than others when it comes to study habits and staying on top of work. It's easy to get behind and difficult to catch up. Take advantage of down times (and make those down times) and don't be afraid to ask for help (ex. office hours) before its too late.

Good luck!

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Johovana’s Answer

Hi
My advise, have a goal on mind, choose wisely what passionate s you , don't hurry things. Concentrate in your future , Does it makes you happy, Go for it, seek for your dreams. Go for internships opportunities. Best lucks

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Desiree’s Answer

Take everything in and become a sponge. Take more of the classes that you gravitate the most towards. Be around the people that make you feel good. Research the school and the different departments they have to offer. Oh, and their library too.

Good luck.

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Eduarda Luísa’s Answer

Hello Jowell, hope you are doing great!

First of all, congratulations on your accomplishment! Going to college is an amazing opportunity! You're going to love it!

I'm currently coursing my 4th semester of Information Systems and here are some of my tips:

1- Make connections. It is a really good idea to start by making friends and getting to know the professors, so you can feel more comfortable around everyone and have a happier and healthier life inside the university. Also, always ask questions to people around you in case you have any, specially in the first months, when everything is new and you receive a lot of information.

2 - Explore the University. Get to know all the places and classrooms.

3 - Don't forget to find time for studying. Create a study routine. That is essential if you want to learn the subjects better and become a great student. Having fun is obviously important, but remember that going to college is an opportunity that not so many of us have. Therefore, enjoy every moment of it and stay focused on your work, when it has to be done.

4 - Also be engaged in as many activities as your university may offer. Enjoy your time at the university!

Hope that was helpful :)


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Richard’s Answer

Treat school like a job. Get up early, get to work and when your work is done at the end of the day, you can spend time on social life or organizations.

Go to class. Plan to spend 2-3 hours studying for every hour of lecture. Attend your professor's office hours and any TA review sessions. If there is a test bank, use that as a study tool to understand what your professor wants you to focus on for the test.

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Desiree’s Answer

Take everything in and become a sponge. Take more of the classes that you gravitate the most towards. Be around the people that make you feel good. Research the school and the different departments they have to offer. Oh, and their library too.

Good luck.

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Skye’s Answer

Give your courses all you've got! Don't draw back from asking questions and driving discussion questions in class. I found the more I asked questions even when no one else was, I would always learn and retain more. Find groups on campus to network with and look into any mentoring programs on campus. Try something new and participate in campus events.

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Abbey’s Answer

Congratulations. College is a very big step. Depending on your situation, I suggest keeping perpective that your class load is your work. You may be enrolled in 14 hours of classes, but treat that as a 40 hour a week job. Figure out your time management plan and follow it. Plan to be flexible, and be sure that you are prioritizing socialization and rest.

Good Luck!

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Britt’s Answer

Ask for help.

It is really difficult for faculty and staff to solve a problem after a crisis occurs, but if there is an issue building and you ask for help soon, most of them will do everything they can to help you. Don't be afraid of looking like the only student that doesn't know how to "fill in the blank." You aren't. Anyone who has been associated with higher education for any length of time has been asked the same question before, but they can't predict which students will need the answers to which questions. Most colleges have a tutoring center or writing center to help students with work outside of the classroom. Be a frequent visitor there.

Ask for help.

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Gabrielle’s Answer

The sooner you learn discipline, the better college will be for you. Discipline doesn't mean that there can't be any fun, it means you know when the fun begins and ends. Study hard, build relationships that are meaningful. Find what makes you happy and stick to you. Graduate! and if you don't wanna do that, come up with a plan and stick to it, once that will set you up and lead to the same or better opportunities.

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Schuyler’s Answer

My biggest piece of advice to you is to be yourself! You've been through high school so you already know how to work hard and to study. What freaks most people out about college is that it is a totally foreign environment. Everyone is worried about making friends and finding a group right away. Take your time--you have four years! Figure out what you're interested in and join a club or two. This is a great and authentic way to meet like-minded people. Hope this helps!

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Melanie’s Answer

Hi there - This is a great question!
1) Don't be afraid to explore different subjects by taking classes that interest you - you may find that you enjoy learning about a specific topic more than you expected!
2) Reach out for help whenever you need it - you may find that other people have had the same thought as well and it can only help you!
3) Time management is very important considering all of the responsibilities that you will have to keep up with on your own - make sure to put in time to eat, sleep, etc. (basic human needs) because while these may seem obvious, sometimes college life gets busy and you may forget to take care of yourself physically and mentally

Best of luck in college!

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Christina’s Answer

First, congratulations on such a great achievement! Remember to look at everything you experience in college as a learning opportunity. You will learn a lot about who you are and who you want to be over the course of four years. Bring your whole self to class and extracurricular activities. It’s the perfect time to try something new, so don’t be afraid to take a risk and join a club you wouldn’t have joined in high school. You will get out as much as you put in. Stay true to yourself and while you are working hard and being involved on campus, remember to take care of your own, personal wellness.

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Kevin’s Answer

I believe the best advice for an incoming freshmen would be to get involved. Actively engaging in school related activities will allow you to develop relationships and open your eyes to new opportunities. Be careful to manage your time effectively and be yourself.

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Nickolaus’s Answer

College Textbooks are quite costly. Most school libraries have a copy of the books. Sometimes classes will only periodically use the textbooks, use your library rather than spending your limited cash.

Find which studying method works best for you. If you can productively study this will be an invaluable resource. For example I always found creating outlines on topics helped me understand the material far better. Do what works for you.

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Marisa’s Answer

Congrats! My biggest suggestion is to get involved! It's a great time to learn about yourself and explore an entire new world. Join clubs, groups, etc. that expand your knowledge base, grow friends/network, and have some fun.

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Nickolaus’s Answer

College Textbooks are quite costly. Most school libraries have a copy of the books. Sometimes classes will only periodically use the textbooks, use your library rather than spending your limited cash.

Find which studying method works best for you. If you can productively study this will be an invaluable resource. For example I always found creating outlines on topics helped me understand the material far better. Do what works for you.

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Mellie’s Answer

1. Get to know you advisor - they're a vital resource when it comes to your educational path. They're there to help you!

2. Introduce yourself to your professors - in person is ideal but even a simple email will do to make yourself stand out from everyone else. It may come in handy for that one-off time you need an extension on an assignment.

3. Be who ever you want to be and meet as many people as you can! Everyone is in the same boat freshman year and just trying to find their way.

Congratulations and have fun!



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Ash’s Answer

Hello Jowell, there are 2 advises I can give you:

1. Read more books - reading can make you more intelligent and wise, so spend more time on reading.
2. Know more about yourself - it's many ways to know more about yourself, you may feel lost in college, so please know what you love, what you hate.

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Blake’s Answer

Hey Jowell,

First and foremost, try and not stress! You have plenty of time to decide what major you'll land on. Spend your first semester meeting people and learning your surroundings.

Thanks,
Blake

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Skye’s Answer

Give your courses all you've got! Don't draw back from asking questions and driving discussion questions in class. I found the more I asked questions even when no one else was, I would always learn and retain more. Find groups on campus to network with and look into any mentoring programs on campus. Try something new and participate in campus events.

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Christine’s Answer

As intimidating as it might seem, try to branch out and try as many things as possible! Join clubs and figure out what you're passionate about and connect with others who have the same interest. If you get involved early, you will feel much more comfortable and propel your career.

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Christine’s Answer

Keep an open mind, work hard and keep your eye on the goal, procrastination can get the best of you sometimes. Get involved in different clubs, ask questions and USE your college advisor to guide you. One piece of important advice when you are feeling overwhelmed or stress with the work load or classes remember to take a break and ask for help if needed that's what advisors, counselors ad mentors are there for.


Good Luck & Enjoy your college years they go by very quickly.

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Tara’s Answer

My best advice to a freshman in college is to join groups right when you get to college. That way you can meet friends with similar goals and values as you. Good friends can either make or break your college experience.

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Marisa’s Answer

Congrats! My biggest suggestion is to get involved! It's a great time to learn about yourself and explore an entire new world. Join clubs, groups, etc. that expand your knowledge base, grow friends/network, and have some fun.

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Deb’s Answer

Make sure that you get involved. Freshman year is the time to meet new people and try new things. If you ever get stressed or nervous know that all freshman are feeling the same way sometime, even if they never admit it. Ensuring you really pay attention to your studies right from the start will help you assimilate to college learning and help make things easier as you continue with added course loads in the future. Have fun, be safe and enjoy.

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Kevin’s Answer

I believe the best advice for an incoming freshmen would be to get involved. Actively engaging in school related activities will allow you to develop relationships and open your eyes to new opportunities. Be careful to manage your time effectively and be yourself.

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Ryan’s Answer

My advice would be to try as many things as possible. Join as many clubs that remotely interest you because they will help you meet people that have similar interests. Be as friendly as possible because the people you meet in college is what makes it so great. The friendships you make and the memories you make with one another is why people enjoy college so much. It is important to be in the moment and take the time to appreciate the journey because soon it will be all over. Try not to wish busy weeks away just because you have a few exams, but still enjoy this time as part of the process. In the end, being an active member of your school will help you enjoy your college experience more.

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Abhinav’s Answer

Hey! I have a few pieces of advice that I feel will be beneficial.

1) Have fun and make sure you are branching out socially
2) Make sure you build time-management skills since you will have many distractions. It may seem daunting to manage a full course load and maintain a social life, campus job, club involvement etc
3)take classes you are interested in not just blow off classes. You are paying a hefty tuition amount so it makes sense to take in as much knowledge as you can and challenge yourself
4)take a light course load to get acclimated to the rigors of college. It's not high school anymore and often times the exams are so difficult that there is actually a substantial curve. Allow yourself to get used to how college works and then feel free to take heavier course loads as you progress
5)Make sure you make use of all the resources available to you. If you are struggling in a class utilize the tutoring services. If you would like to begin searching for internships utilize your school's career services. Now that it is college you are expected to be proactive and search for opportunities.

Hope this helps!

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Katherine’s Answer

Hi Jowell,

I just graduated from college a year ago, so i feel i have a bit of perspective looking back. Something i truly wish i had done more was take advantage of the resources: interesting coursework outside of your major, academic clubs, sports clubs, becoming a teacher's assistant. I wish i had time to go back now and tell myself to invest the time to understand everything my university had to offer as a freshman or even the summer before getting to school, so i was able to make an educated decision about what i found interesting on campus and where to invest my time. Obviously, coming out of senior year of high school you're just anxious and excited to start college so it's hard to utilize your resources fully because there's just so much being thrown at you, not to mention dealing with leaving home for the first time, living with strangers, having so much autonomy over your schedule, etc.

But still, my advice stands, do the research and assess everything your university has to offer, and then focus your efforts on one or two things (outside your normal class schedule) your freshman year. So maybe its one academic club like an entrepreneurship club for example, and then one club sports team like soccer. Don't try to go too far in the opposite direction and spread yourself thin because you're already going to be under a lot of stressors in a new environment. And then over the years build up your engagement with the university, and go deeper into the things you really care about.

This is all stuff I wish i would have done better when i was in college, because it's definitely a lot harder to find the time when you work full time!

Hope this helps and best of luck

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Jonathan’s Answer

Hi Jowell,

Great that you are being proactive about seeking advice for college! The first year of college can be challenging - there is a certainly an adjustment that happens when you start college. Some tips I would suggest include:

1) Get involved! One of the best ways that you can differentiate yourself from your peers is through the experiences and skills that you build outside of the classroom. This can include clubs, competitions, networking events, you name it. As a freshman, people aren't expecting you to be perfect at these things - in fact, just showing up is in itself impressive to most people! Take advantage of the opportunity to start learning and getting involved early.

2) Network and make friends! There is a lot of campus specific advice that you can pick up from your peers, from helpful professors and classes to take, to special events being held on campus, etc. Be friendly and intentional about getting to know people around you, especially upperclassmen who have been a part of college for a while and know the ropes. They can give you guidance specific to your situation and let you know of things you might have missed otherwise! Some of the most enriching activities I have participated in on campus were things that I learned about through friends on campus - without them, I wouldn't have even known they existed! Especially at a larger university, there is so much stuff going on that it can be hard to keep track of it all.

3) Know what your limit is: It is better to be actively engaged and learning from a couple of activities than to be part of many activities, but spread so thin that you feel overwhelmed and you aren't able to fully engage in each of them. Everyone's limit is different but be sure that you aren't overwhelming yourself when you are trying to get involved.

Most importantly, take time to enjoy your time on campus! College truly is a unique time in your life, and the experiences you have are ones that you will look back on fondly. Especially when you are starting out, be sure to give yourself time to adjust, and then look to get involved!

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Jason’s Answer

Hi Jowell,

Congratulations, Jowell! This is an exciting step toward your future.

Time management will be a key part to your success in college. Although you may have other responsibilities, it will be important to make your classes your main priority. Allow yourself plenty of time to complete assignments and study. It is also important to allow time for rest and relaxation. You will want to make time for social activities, too, because you will have opportunities to meet lots of people. It is important to maintain a balance in managing your time, but remember your studies should be your main focus.

Look for ways to get involved with campus life. There are many options you can explore for extracurricular activities. There may be a club or student organization related to your major, or you may find groups related to other interests you have. Participating in these activities can help you to gain skills that could be useful in a future career.

My final piece of advice is to take advantage of resources available to help you be a successful student. There are academic advisors and other student services professionals you can contact. These are people who want to help you succeed as a student.

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Sarah’s Answer

Congratulations Jowell! College is such an exciting time.

Here are a few pieces of advice:

(1) Find ways to get involved. Try out different organizations, with at least one being related to your field of study. It may take time to find the right organization you want to devote time and pursue leadership positions in, and that is okay.

(2) Participate in company sponsored competitions related to your field. This is a great way to meet professionals and build your resume.

(3) Go to office hours, even if you do not need help from the professor. Professors often have a wealth of knowledge, so take advantage and learn about their career path and seek their advice. If you take time to network with professors, you will stand out. The relationships built can be beneficial when you need a reference for a job or a graduate school application.

(4) Always have an updated resume ready to be emailed to a recruiter or professor. Ask a professor or professional mentor to provide feedback on your resume.

(5) Take advantage of your school's career department and the services they offer.

(6) Don't overload your plate. If you are involved in too many things, then you won't be able to do your best at any of them.

Best of luck!






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Pamela’s Answer

Introduce yourself to lots of people! My Freshman year, I kind of found a group of friends and stuck with them the whole year. I didn't really expand my friend group beyond that until my Sophomore year, and I met some awesome friends that I regretted not meeting sooner!!

Make sure you go to as many on-campus events as you can! If your campus doesn't seem to have many student run organizations that have events, maybe there is a way you can get involved?

Have fun, but make sure your school work doesn't fall to the wayside. I know it is easy to lose yourself in some newfound freedom and social life, but if you work really hard early on in your college career, it helps lay a good foundation to make things a bit easier on yourself in your last year!

And most of all.. enjoy your time there! It flies by so make sure you do all you want to do :)

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Britt’s Answer

Ask for help.

It is really difficult for faculty and staff to solve a problem after a crisis occurs, but if there is an issue building and you ask for help soon, most of them will do everything they can to help you. Don't be afraid of looking like the only student that doesn't know how to "fill in the blank." You aren't. Anyone who has been associated with higher education for any length of time has been asked the same question before, but they can't predict which students will need the answers to which questions. Most colleges have a tutoring center or writing center to help students with work outside of the classroom. Be a frequent visitor there.

Ask for help.

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