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Hows the teacher environment?

#educator #professor #teaching #education #teacher

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Shelby’s Answer

Hi Kyle! The answer to this question is really dependent on each individual place you work. However, as a student teacher, I was greeted with open arms and other teachers willing to support me. I hear that is the same or similar when first diving in to teaching. Many other teachers in your grade level/subject area will be willing to support you, so the environment is helpful and friendly. However, when it comes to the classroom itself, it will depend on the funding of your school, student's personalities, and school's disposition towards providing an effective learning environment. Before settling on teaching at a school, see if you can shadow a teacher or volunteer/substitute teach to witness the environment firsthand. Hope this helps!
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Jerome’s Answer

I taught for 31 years in the public school system in the state of North Carolina. I taught in 4 different High Schools with very different demographics. The teaching evironment in each situation was based upon several variables. The size of the school, the size of the district, the size of the classroom in terms of physical size and number of students and the local community and their expectations. The most important variables for me were my colleagues and the adminstration at the school.

All of the options/next steps were questions that I had about the schools in which I taught.

Jerome recommends the following next steps:

Walk down the hallway of a school during class change (High School).
Talk to a couple of teachers to see what they think about the school and the school system.
Talk to one of the administrators to see what their vision is for their school.
Talk to one of the staff members to gauge the school climate. The person at the front desk, a custodian, a bus driver and someone that works in the cafeteria can tell you alot about what it is like to work in a particular school.
What is the appearance of the inside of the school?
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Lauren’s Answer

Teaching can be a tough environment. As a teacher, you will take on the role as professional, educator, mentor, entertainer, confidante, and leader. Being an effective teacher requires patience, resilience, being efficient at multi-tasking, and dedication. Some people love teaching and others do not. If it is a field that interests you then go for it! If you end up loving it then great, and if you end up hating it then switch to another field; you are not locked in to it forever.
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Crislee’s Answer

The environment will depend completely about where and what type of institution you teach. Such as say elementary and/or high school will have different teaching environments depending on the city, size of the school, neighborhood the school resides, and if it is public or private.
College will be a little different as while some students are very young everyone is an adult and what is needed in high school (discipline etc) isn't as necessary in college.
Or like me if you're an educator outside of traditional schooling: 1. I'm a homeschool mother. 2. I taught religion at our church 3. I ran the Education dept at our church. This is all so very different from teaching in a traditional school for so many reasons. However I've worked at all the above except in a college setting. My last, as mother and church educator was far more fulfilling and less stressful and we didn't have the same demands. I also found private school far more favorable to work (but with less pay) than public school. Honestly it seemed to me that parents made the most difference. If you teach in an area that parents are very involved you'll have a happier career. Parents have far more power in both public and private schools than most think. Schools with parents who care more tend to thrive well. And that doesn't matter which (private or public) school you work. I hope that helps some.
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Arisa Chelsea’s Answer

Hi Kyle! I'd say the teacher environment is really different from where you would like to work and what type of teacher you would like to be. For example, working at public school or private ones, which states you work (sometimes the salary is different depends on which states you work in.), how many students and which grade you would like to teach (elementary to university or for adults?) Plus, you could even consider to work in other countries. In Japan, JET program is one of the popular exchange programs for those who would like to work and teach English in Japan.

Personally, I've been studying about Education mainly in Japan, but once I did studying abroad in Norway. I spent a year to learn how the educational system works in the countries. During that time, I visited some local schools and attended some classes. From these experiences of living in Norway, I'd say Scandinavian countries' environments for teachers are much different from the one in the States. If you have some time, I recommend you to search about educations in Finland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark etc. (Højskole in Denmark is also interesting one to take a look at.) Also, these days you also can find tools you can teach remotely; Udemy (Providing your own educational material), OKPanda (teaching English), Preply (teaching languages you would like to teach), Teachlable (you can build up your own online educational program).

Once you figure out what kind of teaching you would like to be professional about, what type of teacher you would like to be, maybe you can start researching for what kind of qualifications you need and how much it will costs etc.

Arisa Chelsea recommends the following next steps:

Search for what type of teaching jobs exist in the world.
Figure out when, where, what type of teaching you would like to start.
Search for the estimated salary you could earn for each type of job. (Consider how much you would like to earn in 5 years, 10 years and even 20-30 years later.)
Search for some case studies (role models) among the internet, the people around you and book authors etc. (Anyone you consider as the people you respect and would like to be like.)
Search for what kind of qualifications and experiences you would be required to work like them. (Create 1 year plan and 3 year plan.) It's also important to be surrounded by motivated people you constantly get interactions with positive energy. Then, finally you start moving forward with a small step. Keep moving forward. (Hope this is helpful!)
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