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How do you get up everyday to go to work?

What is your motivator?

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Subject: Career question for you

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14 answers


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Sophie’s Answer

Each day brings a unique experience. There are times when I'm immersed in a project that excites me or collaborating with a fantastic team. On those days, I might even find myself pondering a challenge overnight and waking up with innovative solutions - these are the effortless days. Admittedly, there are tougher days when fatigue, unfavorable weather, or feeling under the weather can dampen spirits. During those times, I remind myself that my job helps pay the bills and I can look forward to the weekend, as well as the enjoyable activities planned after work is over for the day.

It's important to recognize that even those who have discovered their true calling experience both good and not-so-good days. However, having a job you genuinely enjoy can make a significant difference.
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Ram’s Answer

Good Morning, Justin

There is more than one interpretation of "getting up", and I am going to describe what drives me

If it means getting out of bed, typically I do this between 4:30 and 5:00 in the Mornings. More than 60% of the Time I do this without the benefit of the alarm which I silence manually. As I have aged, occasionally the alarm acts as a catalyst. Maybe the Army Officers Training School regimen from the early-mid '70's is wearing off - after all, it has been almost 50 Years now. To do this consistently, I have also cultivated the habit of going to bed no later than 10 or 10:30 PM, but on a typical Day it is around 9:00 PM

If it means simply begin the work Day, it will be heavily dependent how much one is in tune and likes/loves one's profession. Again, speaking just for myself, I can say that I do love the work I perform. Some people go to church to worship, some to temples, some to synagogues, some mosques, and other such traditional places of worship, usually dictated by another human. In contrast, I come to work.

I might also add that it has been my experience the best rewards for one's work are realized when one has little or no expectations. To begin a task with pre-conceived expectation of a reward it more often than not is a predominant reason for utter disappointment. it is always better to be pleasantly surprised than utterly disappointed. It is my belief this quality is highly promoted in military training - focus on duty than on rewards.

An internal belief of "work is worship", in my opinion, is the best motivator.
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Jerome’s Answer

Motivation? Well... there's the paycheck. :) That'll get you out of bed on those rare days that make you dread going in to the office.
For the rest -- which is the vast majority -- there's the challenge of solving problems, helping people, and making a difference to society, no matter what your contribution.

As so well noted above, focusing on your duty and your responsibilities is a far better motivator than strictly worrying about financial gain.
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Bria’s Answer

I won’t lie, there are days when I dread going to work because I am tired or feel overwhelmed. Try to plan vacations and time off so you have something to look forward to in the future. Those are sometimes my motivations. I try the night before to lay out what I need for the day, so it’s one less thing to worry about. Just anything to ease my stress and worries. Having a planner (actually use it) and productivity boards like Trello, can give a brief satisfaction of finishing task at work. At the end, doing a job that you love helps a lot!
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Theresa’s Answer

As a clinical social worker, I think of all my clients I will see that day and that’s enough for me. I am a dbt therapist and we teach specific skills to our clients who need support regulating their intense emotions. I practice dbt skills too. So in the morning, I do mindfulness/meditation and practice half-smiling and willing hands and that also helps me to get out of bed in the morning.
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Kim Lizette’s Answer

Hi Justin,

When looking for reasons to be motivated at work, lots of grown-ups might say that getting paid is a big part of it, and they're kind of right. But there's something even more important for motivation: doing what you really love. I know not every job is exciting all the time, but it's super important to find a sense of purpose and keep your big dreams in mind for the future.
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Karan’s Answer

Hey,

I completely understand how you feel, as I wasn't a morning person either. It might help to focus on the long-term benefits of starting your day early. By doing so, you'll finish work sooner and have the rest of the day to enjoy for yourself. In my experience, I had to wake up early for school, which eventually helped me adapt to the routine. Plus, with a career in computer science, there's a good chance you'll land a job that allows you to work from home! This means you can still be productive while staying in your own comfortable environment.
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Eric’s Answer

Terrific question, Justin! Different people might have varying responses to this, but as for me, my main inspiration for waking up and heading to work every day comes from my colleagues and team. While earning a paycheck is a factor, being a responsible team member holds more significance for me. I appreciate the people I work with and believe it's crucial to be present and contribute to getting the job done. Throughout my diverse work experiences, I've discovered that valuing my team and colleagues is a top priority, especially when they are generous and intelligent individuals.

Additionally, I'm driven by the desire to maintain financial stability and comfort in my life. This serves as the primary force behind my continuous growth and progress at work.

I hope this insight proves helpful, Justin. Best of luck!
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Christina’s Answer

Hi Justin,
For me getting out of bed starts with my purpose. My dream is changing how families help their children learn and parents in low-income communities have access to relevant work. In my hometown which has a high murder rate, trash is not picked up, and the water is undrinkable, I want to see change. I've been fortunate to see other communities across the world, and I want to bring change there too. Change starts with me. My job is a place where I learn to communicate, build connections, and gain skills that make me an invaluable subject matter expert. All of which are steppingstones to my larger goal. When I was younger, I worked in clothing stores and fast food. I told myself these are the opportunities where I'm going to learn customer service.

I don't get up just for the sake of getting a pay check to pay the bills. I get up for my dream, I get up to bring my family out of poverty which I'm about halfway there...I have a lot of siblings. If I lost this job or quit, I'm still getting up and trying for the same reason.

How can you start thinking about your purpose?
I like this video by thefutur. It helped me: https://www.youtube.com/live/G2SqqjRn_c0?feature=share . I also liked the books: 'Change your World' and 'The 15 Invaluable laws of Growth' by John C. Maxwell.

Yes, sometimes it will be hard. But life and getting up in the morning became a lot easier when I knew why.
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Janardan’s Answer

Hello Justin,
I became a computer engineer by some coincidence. I passed out in 1996. Since then I have been working in software. Something that is challenge and also good about computer science is, it is constantly evolving. There is something new and exciting everyday. So, there is technology that keeps you exciting. Say, recently I heard about ChatGPT and recent Apple Vision Pro. Then, you get curious what is making them work, the technology behind them and how is it made possible. Then, the other part of it is, how can you steer your career to work in areas of your interest. After 25 years, I am doing my masters in Data Science.

Second part of my job is, I am an engineering manager, who became Director of Engineering. What excites me is building people careers. When I work with interns and new graduates, I guide them so that they can make some bold choices early in career. Then, for senior members, I try to tap into their motivation and try to tie them with company strategy. Connecting such dots is win-win-win. Good for team members, good for the company and good for me. I worked with 10 companies and probably 15 teams. No two teams and companies are same, so there is something new everyday.

Most important thing that makes me work up everyday to work is, to try something new. All jobs will have 20% to 90% of routine work. But, I do take 5% to 10% of time to try things new. "Kaizen" is a good thing to search and do.
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DaSabria’s Answer

In the world of business and leadership, consistency is key and highly valued by those around you. If you're finding it hard to maintain this mindset, don't worry, here are a few helpful tips.

First, nurture a deep passion for your job and embrace the idea that every day brings a new learning opportunity that can enhance your problem-solving skills. Second, invest in your physical and mental health as it provides the necessary focus, energy, and mental resilience to face each day. Lastly, networking is crucial. By building robust connections through platforms like LinkedIn and within your workplace, you can boost your well-being and performance. This is especially true when you're engaging with like-minded individuals who are on the same journey as you, striving to reach similar goals.
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Shen’s Answer

Hi Justin,

When I was a graduate, I faced a similar question from a recruiter, and at the time, I wasn't quite sure how to respond. As a new graduate at that time, my main focus was completing assignments and my dissertation, which required me to wake up daily. However, with more work and life experience under my belt, I now understand that the answer better to this question and I think it is based on the life goals you want to achieve.

If your goal is to maintain a 9 to 5 job, it's essential to wake up before 9 to earn your paycheck. On the other hand, if you aim to start your own business, you'll need to invest whatever time and effort it takes to ensure its success. Additionally, if you have a family and children, establishing a routine of waking up early to get your kids to school on time is crucial.

I hope this provides you with some valuable insight.
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Pantea’s Answer

It's all about the caffeine! Get a coffee maker that works on a timer so the smell will get you out of bed.

Do work you actually enjoy because it is a natural motivator.

Have a routine, make sure to get up at a specific time and go to bed by a certain time. Exercise!

Put some good music on! Look for people you want to work with you help energize you. And of course no partying on a school night so you can get out of bed.

Focus on the "why" and long term vision to help you stay motivated so you can reach your Goals! Maybe consider a vision board.
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Ellen’s Answer

You think of the goals you want a car, house, or the nice things you want to buy, you need money so you need to get up every morning. I use picture boards for motivation.
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